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2nd color not in register!! Edge 2, Omega 5.0

Discussion in 'Gerber' started by scramer, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. scramer

    scramer New Member

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    May 3, 2012
    Hello everyone,

    We are having problems with our edge 2 not printing the second color in register. Its off by about 1/32 - 1/16. We typically print 1/c stuff so it really never been an issue but we have some print now with a dual color border and its looks terrible.

    I have calibrated the device but that only seems to help the print to cut situation.

    Is there a way to recalibrate the printing part?

    Sorry, about the Newbish question. We have only owned our used Gerber Edge for about 3 months. Not a lot of experience on it.

    Thanks in Advance,

    Steve
     
  2. J Hill Designs

    J Hill Designs Major Contributor

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    Sep 24, 2004
    use the choke/spread function
     
  3. scramer

    scramer New Member

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    May 3, 2012
    Great idea but already doing it!

    That is exactly how i tried to overcome this challenge but it just too much. The borders are just uneven.

    RRRBBB____BBBRRR <--- Goal
    RRBBB____BBB_RRR <--- Output

    The border need to be even if I can get it.

     
  4. J Hill Designs

    J Hill Designs Major Contributor

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    Sep 24, 2004
    can ya post a photo?
     
  5. Browner

    Browner Member

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    Jun 28, 2005
    Winnipeg
    Make the choke/spread greater?

    I've got mine set to 0.05in as a default. But I guess it depends on the size of the decals you're working with . Try at least 0.01.
     
  6. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    Sep 11, 2003
    Olympia, WA
    There has always been an issue with X axis color to color registration with the Edge that is related to the relative amounts of foil remaining in each cartridge. Gerber provides a software solution in Omega 5 as follows:

    • Output your file from Composer to GSPPlot.
    • Save the file as a SPL file. This will cause the SPL File Viewer to open.
    • Click on the File menu and click on Adjust. This opens a new dialog where you can adjust each color forward or backwards on the X axis.
    • Send the job to the Edge from the SPL Viewer to test print and continue when you have it as you want it.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
  7. Tony Teveris

    Tony Teveris Active Member

    As Fred pointed out.
     
  8. artofacks1

    artofacks1 Member

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    Mar 15, 2014
    Los Angeles
    Is this still an issue with the FX model?
     
  9. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    Olympia, WA
    Yes.
     
  10. artofacks1

    artofacks1 Member

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    Mar 15, 2014
    Los Angeles
    Thanks Fred, doesn't seem like a big issue since you can adjust with the software and test print.

    Do you test print on a less expensiveaterial or the material you will use to produce the final project.

    Do you factor in the test prints and ink in your price to the client / ie: sort of a set up cost .

    Thanks!
     
  11. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    Sep 11, 2003
    Olympia, WA
    You are on a very different page than I am. The price of materials or the small amount of time I may spend correcting color to color registration is very near the bottom of my top ten list of concerns and correcting errors in registration is simply part of what I do. You are still on the page of being concerned about material costs and other costs. I am on the page of being concerned with producing the best product I can and getting paid as much for my time and expertise as possible. I rarely am concerned with being price competitive and my clients are all repeating ones or those who come to me by referral or from having seen my work.

    There are two different approaches to the business of making signs and other graphic products. One is in treating your production as a commodity. Here there is little that separates you from your competition and price becomes the overriding concern. The second is in providing custom made solutions to identified client needs. Here everything about it separates you from your competition be it design, superior choices in materials, better production techniques, better communication with your clients and better salesmanship. When I am successful at presenting myself as a solution provider, the client wants me to supply his or her needs and is willing to pay a higher price. And they are much more likely to return and recommend me to others. In purchasing decisions, fear of loss and assurance that what you will get will meet your needs is far more effective than being the lowest price in town.

    To put that into tangible statements:

    My cost of materials averages between 10% to 15% of gross sales. My return on time ranges between $150 and $250 an hour.

    My original investment in a Gerber Edge, Envision 375, software, vinyl and a cartridge of every foil color offered was about $35,000 in 1998 dollars. That investment has been returned at a rate of between two and three times per year. While there's nothing wrong with watching your costs, the first concern should be what you need to do to bring in enough business at rates that are as profitable as possible and that meet or exceed your income goals.
     
  12. artofacks1

    artofacks1 Member

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    Mar 15, 2014
    Los Angeles
    Fred,

    Thanks for the great posts, I am learning a lot on this forum everyday.

    I agree though, I am on a different level. I am learning and I feel everytime I read one of your posts you help with the learning curve.



     
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