Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

CorelDRAW 2019

Discussion in 'Corel' started by Bobby H, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

    1,616
    54
    48
    Feb 4, 2005
    Lawton, OK
    Corel released its "2019" update to CorelDRAW today. They had a webinar this morning explaining what's new.

    Anyone using a pretty recent version, such as CDR 2018, might not be blown away by the new features. It looks like they've made some performance improvements. Hopefully it will launch faster and work faster in some regards than version 2018. There's a variety of new, non-destructive effects that can be applied to raster and vector-based objects, but many of those effects appear to be raster-based. Some new features have been added to make it easier to fit artwork to an established pixel grid. That could be useful for graphics meant for LED-based message center signs. There is standard support for PDF/X-4. That should help with output to large format printers. Hopefully it will help with moving artwork between CorelDRAW and Adobe Illustrator.

    The biggest news is CorelDRAW 2019 has a Mac version. Unlike CorelDRAW 11 (released around 17 years ago) this version is coming from an entirely new code base, built as a native OSX application from the ground up. It will have feature parity with the Windows version. The Mac and Windows versions of CorelDRAW 2019 are sold separately. If I recall correctly CorelDRAW 11 had both Mac & PC installers in the same SKU box.

    There's also a new CorelDRAW.app online tool for showing off CDR files or other graphics files on portable devices.
     
    Tags:
  2. 2B

    2B Moderator

    2,687
    282
    83
    May 5, 2011
    TX
    Do you have a link for the webinar?
     
  3. fresh

    fresh Very Active Member

    1,242
    93
    48
    May 16, 2011
    nj
    I just saw the update today. I need to call them because I JUST upgraded on Feb 2. So I'm about 10 days past their 30 day refund policy. Grr.
     
  4. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

    1,616
    54
    48
    Feb 4, 2005
    Lawton, OK
    It was a live webinar at 8:00pm CDT this morning. I can't find any place where they might have posted a recording of it. The CorelDRAW 2019 product pages cover most of the details.
     
  5. mfatty500

    mfatty500 Active Member

    689
    57
    28
    May 10, 2010
    Sugar Grove, Ill
    • Like Like x 1
  6. mfatty500

    mfatty500 Active Member

    689
    57
    28
    May 10, 2010
    Sugar Grove, Ill
    The least they could have done was get someone that could speak decent English, and better audio
     
  7. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

    5,599
    206
    63
    Sep 27, 2010
    Mid TN
    I had saw that. I wonder if this means that there may be a Mac version of Wilcom coming out (Wilcom directly interfaces with DRAW).

    I think Painter was also that way as well (both installers, same SKU). Mom was the only one that got that software and it's been a long time, so that may have changed.

    I'm still wondering what Corel is going to do with Parrallels.
     
  8. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

    1,616
    54
    48
    Feb 4, 2005
    Lawton, OK
    I think Corel is making a huge mistake by selling the Mac version as an entirely separate, full license-only SKU. I mean it's one thing when it comes to physical boxed software. Not everything can fit into a little retail box these days, so we kind of expect to commit to one platform. Buying online and downloading software online should provide more flexibility. Unfortunately an existing user of CorelDRAW can't simply upgrade or cross-grade to the 2019 Mac version. The existing CorelDRAW user has to pay the full $499 price as if he never owned a previous version of CorelDRAW (or sign up for the subscription service that costs $198 per year, or $16.50 per month).

    Contrast that with Adobe Creative Cloud. You can install/activate CC desktop apps on up to 2 computers. It doesn't matter if they're Mac or PC. You're not forced to commit to a platform. You can have a Windows PC at work and a Mac at home but run it on both and even trade files between the two computers. CorelDRAW shouldn't be any different. If my PC gets hosed and I have to download the CorelDRAW installer again I can do so from Corel's web site without having to buy anything new. If I have a legal serial number and Corel.com user account it shouldn't matter whether the hosed PC got fixed or if I replaced it with a Mac. If I am a legal registered user I should just be able to download the installer I need.

    I think Corel is going to have a very tough time selling Mac-based graphics people who've never used CorelDRAW before to try it and buy it. I would be willing to bet a big chunk of Mac-based versions of CorelDRAW would be sold to people who've already been using CorelDRAW but want to migrate to the Mac platform. There are existing CorelDRAW users who've been using Mac hardware but running CorelDRAW in a Windows environment via Parallels or something else. They shouldn't have to pay more than $199 to upgrade to the new, native OSX version.

    It's a fairly new acquisition, so I imagine they'll probably develop new versions of it. But I do wonder about their manpower situation, what resoures they have to continue development on Parallels and several other applications they acquired.
     
  9. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

    5,599
    206
    63
    Sep 27, 2010
    Mid TN
    This will be about their main segway into the Mac market (either that or those that want a perpetual license and/or better prices). Most Mac design firms (51% at minimum) only believe that Mac is the way to go and only couple that with Adobe products. That's going to be a hard zealot mentality to break through. Especially given the failure that they had almost 20 yrs ago trying to get into the Mac market.

    Have to recoup that R&D to port over to Mac somehow and the quicker the better.

    Imagine what happens when Mac goes ARM (still speculation, just seems like the rumblings are more pronounced then they have been the last couple of yrs). Or even at best it's just the lower to mid range computers that go ARM and then their big high end versions stay with Intel. That's still going to be something else.


    I don't see the nexus between design related programs to a virtualization program. And especially if their flagship product is now getting the Mac treatment. I mean it's not like how they were handing their Linux version (about the same time that they tried to do a Mac version of DRAW), which would fit to a degree (although they tried to do it within compatibility layers like WINE), I just don't get it.
     
  10. mfatty500

    mfatty500 Active Member

    689
    57
    28
    May 10, 2010
    Sugar Grove, Ill
    What exactly is the difference between mac & windows units when using corel or AI, for that matter, what's the pros/cons to using the mac?
     
  11. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

    5,599
    206
    63
    Sep 27, 2010
    Mid TN
    Not much really. It used to be that there was, now we are talking when I was a little kid back in the 80s, but there really isn't much of a difference with one OS versus another, it's the person at the Cintiq (or keyboard). Shoot, I don't even use either one of those platforms myself. The biggest thing is the cult mentality. That's what still has the strongest sway, in my mind anyway.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

    1,616
    54
    48
    Feb 4, 2005
    Lawton, OK
    It's certainly going to be tough for CorelDRAW to break into existing Mac-based work-flows that are heavily dependent on Adobe software. One thing that might be on their side is not charging a $50+ per month subscription to use the software. But in order to be seen as a worthwhile alternative to Adobe Illustrator or InDesign the folks at Corel have to dramatically improve the ability of CorelDRAW to accurately import PDF, AI and EPS artwork without shifting gradients, changing transparency effects or causing other alterations of existing artwork.

    Corel didn't do a great job trying to enter the Mac platform the last time around. This time they've spent 3 years on development and worked closely with Apple to build CorelDRAW 2019 from the ground up as a native OSX application. The OSX application has feature parity with the Windows version, but some menu items have been re-arranged and keyboard short cuts changed for OSX UI conventions. It's not a Windows-app ported into Mac clothing.

    It will be interesting to see how the Mac version of CorelDRAW performs compared to its Windows counterpart.

    The thing is Corel might generate a greater sales total with a possibly greater number of $199 upgrade orders rather than fewer $499 full version buys. Going from a Windows-based PC to a Mac is an already expensive proposition. The Corel situation would add another $300 premium to that.

    OSX-on-ARM rumors have circulated for years. While such a thing could happen eventually, I'm skeptical of it happening anytime soon. The previous two major transitions on the Mac platform were difficult for customers and hell on software developers. They often had to create two different builds of a Mac application. It was that way when the Mac platform transitioned from the original "classic" MacOS to OSX. It happened again with the jump from Motorola to Intel CPUs. Support and development quickly ended for old hardware. Today people are keeping personal computers much longer than they did in the past.

    Apple's personal computer business hasn't been in the greatest of shape lately. They got a lot of bad publicity over flawed notebook keyboards. They caught a lot of heat (literally) over thermal issues affecting high end notebooks and products like the little coffee grinder shaped Mac Pro "tower." The current top of the line Mac, the iMac Pro, has no upgradeable parts inside. But now they're actually talking about bringing back an actual computer tower product, presumably one where at least some of the parts are user service-able and upgrade-able. With all of that being said (as well as the iPhone's "battery-gate" controversy), I don't think switching from Intel X86 CPUs to ARM processors would go over well at all currently.

    I think it all depends on one's work-flow and all the associated software and hardware involved in it. For certain creative tasks it's still better to be on the Mac platform, mainly for all the infrastructure established over 30 years. Any Mac-based service bureau or other organization that handles lots of customer provided files might benefit from adding CorelDRAW. It might let them exchange CDR-based artwork with others, such as sign companies, much easier.

    I can't see many sign companies switching from PC to Mac over the availability of a Mac-based version of CorelDRAW. The sign industry has been going in the reverse direction over the past decade with fewer and fewer sign industry specific applications made for OSX.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2019
    • Like Like x 1
  13. mfatty500

    mfatty500 Active Member

    689
    57
    28
    May 10, 2010
    Sugar Grove, Ill
    That's what I thought whoever answered my question was going to say, my sister has a mac and "uses" it, but she refuses to install windows on it to be able to install Corel, to (view any files) I think those people just like to say they have a mac, then of course they have to throw in the fact that it doesn't get viruses, which is a lie, she had one that lasted only 5-6 years and in the shop to get cleaned out several times, while they ol windows machines just keep on ticking...
     
  14. Ian Stewart-Koster

    Ian Stewart-Koster Active Member

    823
    10
    18
    Sep 27, 2003
    Qld, Australia
    Can this version work on a PC that is NOT connected to the internet?
     
  15. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

    5,599
    206
    63
    Sep 27, 2010
    Mid TN
    Even if you got the perpetual version, it has some type of online activation. Now, it may have it to where you can get the activation file from a computer that is online and transfer that file to the necessary computer. That to me would be about the only way that you could get it on a computer without internet activation. But my last "dance" with DRAW was in the X6 days (the first version that required online activation).
     
  16. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

    1,616
    54
    48
    Feb 4, 2005
    Lawton, OK
    “Pretty soon” customers will only be able to buy CorelDRAW via online download. That will make the activation thing a moot point since there won’t be a way around it. IMHO it just needs to go to a user account based setup just like Adobe Creative Cloud. You just log in and manage activations, installations, download software, clip art, etc.
     
  17. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

    5,599
    206
    63
    Sep 27, 2010
    Mid TN
    Download digital file to USB, take USB to offline computer. It's what I do now.

    Doesn't matter if it's physical media or digital media. Shoot, I've taken all my old physical media that I wanted to make sure to archive and I've ripped them as ISOs. Most VM software will allow mounting of ISOs as "optical drives" in the older OSs that don't support mounting of ISOs, most latest OSs (not including all still supported OSs mind you) do directly as well. For Win 7, when I had it installed on bare metal, I used WinCDEmu (portable version) in order to achieve the same thing.


    See, I'm one of those that believes production rigs should be offline, isolated. Run too much of a risk, not just in malware (and I do define malware fairly broadly), but even as something as an update from MS screwing things up (which is in no shortage now). That's not even taking into consideration when things go down (either on your end or whatever server your trying to access).

    I don't mind the digital delivery at all. I have no attachment to physical media in that regard.
     
  18. Keith van der Westhuizen

    Keith van der Westhuizen New Member

    15
    3
    3
    Oct 12, 2018
    South Africa
    Hi guys,

    I have the annual subscription with Corel Draw 2018.... why am o unable to get 2019?

    My understanding of the annual subscription was that should a new release become available; one would automatically have access to it? Like with adobe CC...

    I now see that I have to pay a $300 upgrade fee for CDR 2019!

    What is the point of the subscription then?
     
  19. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

    1,616
    54
    48
    Feb 4, 2005
    Lawton, OK
    I don't think it's going to cost $300 per year to be able to update a perpetual license of CorelDRAW to its newest version. But it's not completely clear if it will cost $198 per year or $99 per year just to be able to update that perpetual license. Other users here have suggested once you sign up for what they're now calling "upgrade protection" (formerly premium membership) you'll pay $99 per year and get the newest version each year when it is released for that one fee. But subscribers are paying literally double to get the same thing. And that's what gives me doubts about the $99 deal. On the other hand a CorelDRAW subscriber doesn't have to pay nearly $500 up front for a perpetual license, which would seem to make the $99 renewal fee for perpetual license holders seem more fair.

    Still, either way, perpetual license holders of CorelDRAW are faced with a tough and not too cheap choice. They can either hold on to what they have (which was a considerable dollar investment) and never be able to update it again for upgrade pricing. Or they can have a revolving bill that buys each upgrade even if an upgrade is a really yawn-inducing update. I just feel like that's a bad way for Corel to treat its customer base.
     
  20. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

    5,599
    206
    63
    Sep 27, 2010
    Mid TN
    Wait until talking about software whose perpetual licenses cost around $15k for 1 seat.

    You can pretty much see this with any SaaS package. Some may start out all well and good as far as quality of updates go, at some point marginal utility kicks in for everything. At that point, acquiring companies and integration of those acquisitions is about the only way to keep "innovating".
     
Loading...

Share This Page

 


Loading...