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Free ICC profile creation tip. (patch count)

Discussion in 'RIP Software & Color Management' started by Pauly, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. Pauly

    Pauly Colour Guru

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    We all love free stuff right?
    I know 90% of you who make your own profiles most likely use i1 Profiler.

    This information comes straight from X-Rite. It's on the internet, so it's not to difficult to find. But it was mentioned not long ago about how many patches to measure and everyone coming up with different numbers.

    As said in the quote, i1 Profiler defaults to 2033 patches and it already has it as a saved target.
    There's also other charts like:
    IT8/7.3: ISO 12642 target
    IT8.7/4 - 2005: a newer version of the IT8/7.3 chart which has 1617 patches (formerly 928 patches)
    ECI2002: which is an extended version of the IT8/7.3 chart with added patches developed by ECI.

    All those targets are in i1 profiler, and on the internet to download with a quick search.

    Fell free to discuss, or add your own experiences.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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  2. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Member

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    Xrite being Xrite, maybe they failed to mention a very important factor regarding patch count.

    What number of patches provide the best neutral and near-neutral patches in the layout will provide a more accurate result from the ICC profile?

    For machines running as RGB, I can offer 2371 as an example and it produces 168 near-grays which is enough to get a good average for gray balance. 2945 will produce 195 near-grays. These particular numbers will work even while sampling heavy canvas with the i1 or iSIS. If you’re familiar with G7 you might already have optimum CMYK layouts using their optimum gray patches.

    Any typical patch count will utilize the gamut of the machine. One of the only benefits of high patch counts is producing averages of sample readings due to rough media textures, nozzle deflections, head mis-alignment, etc. Otherwise, high counts should be unnecessary.
     
  3. ikarasu

    ikarasu Active Member

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    The highest in my onyx is 2383, which is usually what I use. I havent had time to try a lower patch count... But I might make time just to compare.
     
  4. Pauly

    Pauly Colour Guru

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    Melbourne
    There is no "1 solution for everything"

    If you're creating targets in i1p, You can see the bottom few rows of neutrals, When you keep adding, you'll see patches keep getting added to the bottom rows until it jumps to the next large target set, then you'll see neutrals shrink until you add more again.
    I've never had bad neutrals from i1p with low patch counts, software these days is that advance that you don't really need excess amount of neutrals in default charts.

    High patch count does not produce averages unless you have multiples of the same patches. You are way better off doing a lower patch count and measuring twice or make the patches wider.

    FYI Barbieri mostly use ECI2002 and IT8.7/4 for most of their targets. Theres only 1 target with 3536 patches

    I've always used the 944 target with great results. It was a while since i tried a high patch count in onyx, i'll do it again and see what happens. last time i did it, i had the same results as the lower patch count.
     
  5. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Member

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    Yes, and particular patch counts "fill" the void evenly to build the matrix of not only near-grays.
    Different shops may have different and specific requirements for neutral color balance for their customers. Many problems stem from the sample reading of media from devices and not as much from software calculations.
    Which is what high patch counts produce, nearly the same color upon which to average.
    To expect better results from measuring twice, one would need to print two sets of swatches or turn a single set 90 or 180 degrees for the second reading.

    High patch counts are usually unnecessary but certain patch counts will provide more near-grays upon which to build optimum profiles.
     
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