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help wraping a round cooler

Discussion in 'Tips & Tricks' started by signwizz, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. signwizz

    signwizz Active Member

    im wrapping a round cooler and can't figure out how to do the round tapered part on top where the lid goes,its a seperate peice than the flat part ,but it's rounded and tapered any ideas quick pic to show cooler
     

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  2. signage

    signage Major Contributor

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    Diameter of both sections place together on a rectangular shaped layout.
     
  3. bob

    bob Major Contributor

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    Flattening out the lip in a two dimensional image won't do much for you in this case. It would be much like trying to flatten out a hat.

    Since the tapered lip is essentially a cross section of a cone, it's possible and reasonable to flatten out a cone. Here's the brute force method: Make a paper cone that perfectly fits over the lip. Mark the height of the lip on the bottom of the cone. Now flatten the piece of paper from which you fashioned the cone. The strip at the bottom, which should be an arc, where you marked the height of the lip represents the exact size and shape of the piece of vinyl you'll need to wrap this section of the cooler.

    You can also do this analytically. That would be with conic geometry and no physical models. The necessary formulas are readily available on the web. This method requires at a minimum the diameter of the base of the lip, the diameter of the top of the lip, and the height of the lip. It may prove more difficult and thus inaccurate to take these measurements than to simply create a physical model.
     
  4. signwizz

    signwizz Active Member

    im not quite getting what u said lol here is a pic of the top
    shane (confused)
     

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  5. SlightlyChilled

    SlightlyChilled Very Active Member

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    try using a trapezoid style cut peace
     
  6. wildside

    wildside Very Active Member

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    are you asking how to design it?
    are you asking how to install it?
    are you asking how to scale it?
    are you asking how to measure it?
     
  7. signwizz

    signwizz Active Member

    how to measure to cut the vinyl to fit the curve
     
  8. wildside

    wildside Very Active Member

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    i wouldn't, overprint and stretch and trim on barrel, no precutting...

    but this is based on no idea of what the design is.....
     
  9. signwizz

    signwizz Active Member

    its just a blue stripe with writing on it like a coors light can
     
  10. J Hill Designs

    J Hill Designs Major Contributor

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    gonna be fun with the writing
     
  11. bob

    bob Major Contributor

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    Often the easiest ways to determine what sort of shape a flat piece of material needs to be to fit a three dimensional object is to make a paper template or model of the object and then lay that template on a flat surface. This then is the shape you must make to have it properly fit the object.This works well for object with relatively modest concavity and/or convexity, like auto windshields, and, ta da, conics.

    In this case the object is conical with a bit of a lip at the top. If you made a cone of paper that fit snugly around the base and the lip you'd pretty much have your pattern to layout and cut your vinyl. You can deal with the recess under the lip by stretching the vinyl that little bit to conform to it.

    The simplest way to do this is take a sufficiently large sheet of paper wrap it around the drum so that it contact both the base and the lip of the area in question. Then mark both the base and the lip of the object on the paper. Lay the paper flat and where you marked will describe the shape you need to fit the object.

    It's not rocket surgery.
     
  12. Moze

    Moze Very Active Member

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    Bob, don't you mean brain science?

    OP: Here's a somewhat accurate picture of the method being verbalized:

    P.S. Try wrapping the cooler. Wraping it might get you in trouble. :)

    P.S.S. Never mind, I see you already wrapped it. Or wraped it. :)
     

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  13. Mike Paul

    Mike Paul Major Contributor

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    Blue krylon fusion.
     
  14. Msrae

    Msrae Rae

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    So now that you have finished the wrap, are you going to share with everyone how you did it?
     
  15. signwizz

    signwizz Active Member

    i cut 2" masking tape into 2" peices and went around the whole top then peeled it off and stuck it to the table took measurements and duplicated on the computer .Pretty simple really
    thanks for the advice and spelling correction lol
     
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