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Hp latex 315 or Mimaki cjv150

Discussion in 'Digital Printing' started by Jb1983, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Jb1983

    Jb1983 Member

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    Well it appears time to move on from my mimaki cjv30-130 as repairs are going to be very expensive. Im 99% sure im going to buy a new machine so I need the ability to print and cut.

    I run a small signage business and print less than a 150ft of vinyl per week on average. I definitely want at least a 54" machine. Ive pretty well narrowed it down to these 2, unless there's others anyone recommends I look in to?

    Pricing on these 2 options is very close so that's not a concern the real important part is what machine is going to be better for me?

    Does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions, or experience / own these machines?
     
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  2. AKwrapguy

    AKwrapguy Active Member

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    If you're not going to be printing that much I would look at going with latex as it means that less waste ink and maintenance.
     
  3. CanuckSigns

    CanuckSigns Very Active Member

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    If you print many shorter runs on various media, I would avoid the HP, the process of loading and unloading the media is very slow compared to the mimaki, and you can't print on anything shorter than about 40"

    We run an Epson s80600 machine and love it, have you looked at the Epson s40600 machine and pairing it with a plotter? A print cut machine is great and we used a print cut Roland for over 10 years, but the ability to print one job and cut another at.the same time is well worth the money.
     
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  4. zopylote

    zopylote New Member

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    go for any eco-solvent printer
    as a print tech i recommend mutoh
     
  5. VanderJ

    VanderJ Merchant Member - Printer Parts and Sevice

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    If you liked the CJV30, the CJV150 is an obvious choice. Super low learning curve and it runs exactly like the CJV30 with a few little changes here and there. It's essentially a faster, higher quality, version of the CJV30.
     
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  6. Jb1983

    Jb1983 Member

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    Having the ability to print and cut at the same time is what was leaning me towards the HP 315.... I do print shorter runs for the most part though, although since im just a small out of home business a little more time loading the machine isn't the end of the world for me.

    Thanks for the info, ill look in to an Epson dealer as my supplier does not carry them.
     
  7. AGCharlotte

    AGCharlotte Member

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    Not sure why you think you can't print narrower than 40" on the 315, I've printed plenty of 30" & 36" (99% sure I've also done 24") rolls on my 310 which should be basically the same as the 315 (actually just googled, 315 should go all the way down to 10" rolls but 23" is "fully supported". If you're primarily running vinyl then the time changing materials would be pretty minimal. Granted changing out a roll isn't time consuming, the bars on the mimaki are just more convenient.

    There's also the HP 115 (I think the 315 is EOL now), which I've heard is a good machine.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
  8. equippaint

    equippaint Very Active Member

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    If I had to choose between a time suck it would be waiting on my printer/cutter and not fiddle farting around with loading media. At least you can do other things while you are waiting like prep files or waste time in here. If we consistently ran a single type of media then it would be a different story. If you're working out of your house by yourself, workflow bottlenecks from a print/cut machine are highly unlikely.
     
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  9. AGCharlotte

    AGCharlotte Member

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    Oh... I missed this earlier. The 315's cutter is ONLY a cross-cutter (X-Axis). So if you were looking to make contour cuts, this is not going to do that.
     
  10. Jb1983

    Jb1983 Member

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    Where did you get this info? I don't believe its accurate..
     
  11. VanderJ

    VanderJ Merchant Member - Printer Parts and Sevice

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    HP does not a have a printer cutter combo machine. When they say print and cut they mean two separate machines.
     
  12. AGCharlotte

    AGCharlotte Member

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    HP's specs for the machine specifically say X-Axis cutter.
    https://www8.hp.com/us/en/commercial-printers/latex-printers/315.html
    download the data sheet, it's on page 3... only a cross cutter. This is basically the only difference from my 310.

    They sell "print and cut" packages but that's them throwing in a separate cutter, like shown in this link.
    https://www8.hp.com/us/en/commercial-printers/latex-printers/315-print-cut.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
  13. Jb1983

    Jb1983 Member

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    Sorry I am specifically looking at the print and cut 2 device combo package, I realize the printer is not an all in one unit.
     
  14. AGCharlotte

    AGCharlotte Member

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    Ahhh... just wanted to make sure we're comparing Apples to Apples! I think I misunderstood your "I want to be able to print and cut at the same time" to be "on the same machine".
     
  15. BigfishDM

    BigfishDM Merchant Member

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    LATEX, you're going to be doing daily maintenance with the mimaki. If you dont run it all the time the inks and heads will become a major issue also. The main negative with Latex is the 220v requirements and you cant load small scrap pieces of material. They are also not the best for printing pastels. I would say there are much more positives than negatives with Latex.
     
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  16. AKwrapguy

    AKwrapguy Active Member

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    Running a HP570 and I run jobs smaller than 40" all the time with no problem and Loading and unloading is pretty easy with the newer machines.
     
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  17. jsmoritz2000

    jsmoritz2000 Very Active Member

    I've been running a CJV150-130 for two and a half years now in a small shop and we do about the same output as this guy. We shut down every year around Christmas and New Year's for at least two weeks. I've let the printer sit idle for as long as seventeen days without even a light cleaning of the head first and got a perfect test print. I've never had to perform daily maintenance. Hell, we get so busy, I'm lucky if I can even perform maintenance on a weekly basis. I don't even run test prints but maybe every 3 or 4 months because these things maintain themselves, for the most part, and print flawlessly. But that's just my opinion and I have no experience with latex, personally. We bought the Mimaki for our shop because the complaints I read on this forum with regards to Mimaki printers are few and far between. The print and cut capability is amazing also, once you figure out the machine's quirks.
     
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  18. Jb1983

    Jb1983 Member

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    Yes ive had my cjv30-130 for 4 years and its been pretty durable. I can openly admit it had a rough go especially at the start due to me not having any knowledge and jumping in to this business. That said I did clean it, although like you not every day, I would do it once or twice a week. Mine did the self maintenance thing or running the ink/pump to prevent clogs a few times a day however which did waste a bit of ink...
    So as for durability/reliability I think the Mimaki is a great workhorse. The biggest negative I had with it was the CUTTING ACCURACY especially when the feed length started to go past 36" it would start to go off track and with certain jobs (print/lam/cut) theres only so much bleed room till it starts to look just wrong.

    Im leaning towards the HP 315 combo and hope to make my decision by the weekend.
     
  19. LATEX, LATEX, LATEX

    I own a 315, i run 30" rolls all the time.

    I don't understand the comment on loading the material, it seems very easy to me.

    I have been printing with latex for 8 or so years now before that it was ecosolvent - never again. latex is 100 times easier.

    i've had the 315 for about 9 months, i have run 36K sq ft and not one issue. print heads are perfect, just replaced ink cart's.

    about as easy as it gets.

    before that I had 4 HP l25500's, they ran their course and had issues at the end of their life, but well worth the cost.
     
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  20. myront

    myront CorelDRAW is best

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    Have you any experience with other printers? Mimaki was the easiest I've ever seen. I'll give it to HP though for finally listening to their customers. The newer models are a lot easier to load.

    Changing media/substrate on the HP360 in a nutshell

    1. Release pinch rollers (lever)
    2. Roll substrate out then pull roll out roll with with rod in the core and set on the printer platform holder thingy.
    3. Provided you have 8 to 10ft to the right of the printer, flip lock lever to remove the disc holding the core in place then remove rod from core. We have to pick up the whole thing and put on a table to remove the rod.
    4. With rod removed pick up roll and place in its rack or wherever you keep it.
    5. Grab your next roll and set it on the printer platform thingy. Has to be sitting in a particular spot.
    6. insert the 6ft rod thru the core
    7. grab the disc thing that holds the core in place and flip lever to lock.
    8. Flip up the platform and roll clicks into motor gears.
    9. Grab leading edge of material and shove...wait I think you have to tell it on the panel that your going to load material first.
    10. Now grab the leading edge and slowly feed it in. Too slow = FAIL.
    11. Provided you got it in time the printer will lead you thru several prompts.
     
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