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Need Help Importing EPS files from Illustrator

Discussion in 'Corel' started by Barry Jenicek, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. Barry Jenicek

    Barry Jenicek Member

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    I am running CorelDraw X3 and have a problem with Importing .EPS files from clients using Illustrator.

    From Corel’s IMPORT EPS Dialog Box, I choose the Import Option of IMPORT AS EDITABLE CURVES. That is when I get the Error Message.

    So I have two questions…

    1. Is there a workaround for this WITHOUT getting the client involved?

    And

    2. I believe, on the Client's end, they would need to export the EPS file at a lower version, thus Corel x3 should be able to import it. Not having ever used Illustrator, What are the steps I would need to tell the client to do in order to export to a lower EPS version? Yes, I know, any Graphics Artist should know how to do this but there are times when they need a little help. What I am look for is a Step-by-Step narrative.

    Thanks for your input

    Bj
     
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  2. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    What is the specific error message that is coming up when you try to import the file?

    Depending on the nature of the artwork there may be no other choice than to involve the client or whoever created the artwork. Some fixes are pretty simple, such as getting the design to save a copy of the artwork with all the type converted to outlines. Other fixes might require altering the artwork itself.

    CorelDRAW X3 is a fairly ancient and outdated version. CorelDRAW in general has issues with importing AI, EPS and PDF artwork generated by Adobe Illustrator. Gradient fills and transparency effects both pose serious problems to older versions of CorelDRAW. Even the newest versions (like CDR 2018) are prone to shifting a gradient's size, position and angle on its parent object. I receive enough Adobe-generated artwork from clients that I can't avoid using Adobe Illustrator (and Creative Cloud). I hop back and forth between CorelDRAW X8 and 2018 depending on the task.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. 54warrior

    54warrior Member

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    I do this fairly often and you're probably going to need it exported in an older file. Or upload it here and someone can convert it for you perhaps?
     
  4. chadorama

    chadorama Owner & Sole Employee

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    The newer versions of Corel are much better with imported vectors but still jam up sometimes. Most of the time it’s related to a font that hasn’t been converted to a curve or lines and you may have to go to your client and ask them to do that and resend. Color gradients or special fills can sometimes cause issues that will need to be resolved with your client. It’s also possible to inlist some help from fellow Corel users like myself that can back save to an earlier version for you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
  5. myront

    myront CorelDRAW is best

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    Ask the client to make a pdf. Illy users don't ever take into account that not everyone uses illy and eps isn't a good "universal" file type. Especially if gradients are used. This is the only reason we keep a subscription to adobe. I don't use it for any other reason other than to convert stubborn files.
     
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  6. d fleming

    d fleming Very Active Member

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    Try importing using post script interpreted filter. 50/50 shot.
     
  7. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

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    I'm a Corel guy but there is a lot of utility in Illustrator that is worth the time to take a look at if you have to keep a copy around anyway.

    wayne k
    guam usa
     
  8. Abraxas Aguilera

    Abraxas Aguilera New Member

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    Try running it through Adobe Distiller, to create a PDF
     
  9. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    PDF is no better than AI or EPS as an exchange format for Adobe Illustrator files being sent into CorelDRAW. Actually the PDF format is much worse in some regards. If a PDF is generated without Adobe Illustrator editing capability reserved (which is the case about 99% of the time I get PDF files) the imported artwork is an absolute mess. We're talking clipping masks galore and lots of duplicate paths with no fill or outline (but will cut on a vinyl plotter or routing table if present). Then you get oddities like rectangular ruling lines and letter "I" characters being converted into 2 point open path lines with a stroke added to them. And that's on top of all the usual issues that come with importing Illustrator and EPS artwork. I can automate a good bit of that PDF clean-up work within Illustrator using Astute Graphics' Vector First Aid plug-in. There's no such solution for CorelDRAW.

    The real problem is all the areas in which CorelDRAW is deficient compared to Adobe Illustrator.

    No one can describe me as a hardcore Adobe fanboy. I've been using CorelDRAW for almost 30 years from its earliest versions up to version 2018. I've also been using Illustrator since its very primitive PC-only 4th version (still have the old floppies for it, along with the floppies for Photoshop 2.5). I use CorelDRAW everyday. I like its tool set for technical drawings, much larger work spaces for full size designs and numerous other features where it actually bests Illustrator. Still, I'm not afraid at all to point out areas where CorelDRAW falls short. Color handling, gradients and transparency effects are all problems with CorelDRAW. I receive plenty of client-provided artwork that cannot be handled in CorelDRAW accurately due to those issues. This morning I'm dealing with one project involving very complex group in their logo. The Illustrator object has a 50% transparency effect applied to it. I cannot apply a similar transparency effect to the group in CorelDRAW 2018; it gets rejected with the message "too many objects." So I'll do the basic design work in CorelDRAW, but we'll use Adobe Illustrator CC 2018 to generate the actual large format print files.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Reveal1

    Reveal1 Member

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    We're relatively small but design is an important part of our business. As a standard business practice we keep up-to-date copies of both CC and Corel which pretty much covers all bases (plus we use FlexiDesign on occasion). In the grand scheme of things we view it as a necessary and not all that expensive core business expense. Not to hate on anyone who doesn't agree, but I always wonder why a graphics-centered business would try to save a few bucks on software (for example I just paid $159 to upgrade Corel) when the cost of messing around with incompatible files can cause so many issues. All of the current programs have very similar command sets so that anyone reasonably up to date technically (if not you have the wrong designers) should be able to adapt to their nuances.
     
  11. myront

    myront CorelDRAW is best

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    Speed equals more income faster. Speed eliminates the competition. Most clients will ask how long and will go to the fastest. The fastest to design a layout, email a proof to a client for approval, and get it into production wins. Corel trumps Adobe all day long in that category.

    We've been using the same software version as 4 years ago with no problems. Cost for 4 upgrade licensed versions was around $800. What would be the cost for 4 adobe subscriptions over that same 4 year period? Roughly $10,000! ($53p/mo x 4 copies x 48mos)
     
  12. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    Design work is not an assembly line process like turning bolts on a car manufacturing line. It's not a sport either. Race through a design and chances are good it will look like eye-balled, thrown-together crap. Most sign projects are different. We produce our design work and bids acceptably fast. But we're not rushing through things.

    But one thing I will not do is waste hours upon hours of time trying to use CorelDRAW to fix some client-provided PDF. Trying to do that makes about as much sense as using the dishwasher to bake a cake.
     
  13. myront

    myront CorelDRAW is best

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    Client needs to learn the best way to make a pdf "universal" from Adobe
     
  14. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    I think speed in this case is about efficiency, not necessarily rushing through things. Those are (to me) 2 different "speeds".

    While I do not agree with the assessment of Corel "winning" in this category, as there could still be some variables that would make it skew one way or the other depending on the user and what they are more efficient with, I do agree with the importance of efficiency. That is also how one can pick up % points of margin which may improve profit as well.

    The designer needs to learn, sometimes the client is at the mercy of the designer and it isn't there fault (not all the time, but more often then not).
     
  15. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    You're using the term "universal" in a very subjective manner. Universal to what? For the vast majority of people out there a PDF only needs to be able to open and print accurately from Adobe Reader to be work-able. Professional level RIPs have compatibility built into them to understand the bells and whistles Adobe put into the technology. Maybe the thing that needs to happen is Corel should put more work into its import filters for Illustrator, EPS and PDF.

    Of course even if Corel could properly update how it handles Adobe-centric artwork, that still leaves the problem for someone working with old software (like CorelDRAW X3). The problem is no client has any duty at all to dumb his artwork down so it imports successfully in outdated software. CorelDRAW X3 doesn't support the full OpenType specification; many features of OpenType fonts won't work in that program. You need X6 or later. Corel X8 or later is required just to get the app up where it can handle some of Illustrator's transparency effects, like transparency in gradients.

    Adobe's software is far more common and ubiquitous in the advertising industry. CorelDRAW is a small minority player in that regard, and made even smaller since they don't have a Mac version of it. That reality puts more pressure on sign shops to be friendly to receiving Adobe-centric artwork.

    I have no patience at all for the zero sum game Corel vs Adobe nonsense. CorelDRAW is great at some things, but sucks at others. The same goes for Adobe Illustrator. It doesn't cost our shop a whole lot more to support both. We're able to take advantage of the strengths of both applications. Plus we have the benefit of not having to waste nearly as much time trying to fix client assets before it goes into production.
     
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  16. shoresigns

    shoresigns Very Active Member

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    Why are you using 12 year old software if you want to open external files from clients? Update to the latest Corel and you'll have less problems. You're behind by 7 major Corel releases.

    I know there are a TON of people here who like to use their old software, but there's no argument here. You should only run old software if you're doing most of the design work and not generally taking files from clients.
     
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  17. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    But not in every industry that the file could be going to (in mine Ai is the oddball and I'm even more of an oddball for only working in Ai, when I was using Windows predominately). If the designer is not knowing what all that file(s) is going to be going, they need to take reasonable precautions of what will or won't work. Now, I did say within reason. I fired up my Win 7 VM to check out CS6 and while the Ai editing ability is/was the default there, it also had a blurb explaining why to leave it on. If any of that applies to the file, the designer needs to have the presence of mind to leave it on. Especially if it's staring them right in the face. At least within CS6.

    I mention about the Ai editing specifically is that was one issue that you seem to have the majority of the time.

    Corel had a Mac version of it and they also had a Linux version of their suites. They did something somewhat bad with the Linux version as to why that didn't do as well, but I blame the cult of Mac and the cult of Adobe for why it didn't make it on the Mac version. I'm sure it wasn't feature parity with the Win version (just like Adobe wasn't between the 2 initially), but don't support something, why would the vendor spend money in an area that there isn't an ROI?

    As was mentioned, no argument here.
     
  18. shoresigns

    shoresigns Very Active Member

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    PDF is universal. What's it's not universal for is when people try to use it for purposes it wasn't designed for.

    I've said this dozens of times, but PDF is for artwork that is finished. It was never meant to be opened in Corel/Illustrator and pulled apart for editing, yet people endlessly complain about how difficult it is to do so. What you're doing in that scenario is taking a finished, compiled file and reverse engineering it back into a working file. What you should be doing is getting the actual working files from the customer if you want to make major edits.
     
  19. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    Adobe's software is the standard for the advertising industry. Most professional branding work, graphic design work and page layout work is all done in Adobe's applications. Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop are very commonly used. Most of the production-ready artwork I receive from clients is in some kind of Adobe-based format, Illustrator .AI or .PDF usually. I get a lot junk artwork from amateurs as JPEG images, sometimes saved out of pirated versions of Photoshop. It is a rare event that I receive CorelDRAW files from anybody and those CDR files usually come from another sign company.

    Embroidery is very much a niche category. No major company is going to start out its branding work with an embroidery design and split off from there.

    Frankly whatever Corel could have done or should have done really doesn't make any difference. The failure of CorelDRAW 11 on the Mac platform is nearly 2 decades in the rear view mirror. The reality is what it is, like it or not.
     
  20. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    That's not my point. My point is that those files are going out into areas where Ai is not the standard being used. Supplying a more universal file format that can be handled by other software should be done.

    Include the master if your sending it to someone that needs the master, but include something that is setup that is finished and that can be read by everyone. That's what someone should be doing.

    It is not a long shot to reason that those getting branding are going to be sending those files where Ai may not be the standard.

    PDF (which IS an Adobe format and should very easily be done) is more then sufficient for me. EPS files tend to be alright, but PDFs have the better track record.

    Any editing that I have to do, I don't have to directly do in the PDF. So all it has to do for me is open, which may or may not be the needs of everyone. Which, in that case, if it doesn't fit your need use another file that does. Sending 1 file, that's typically the master file, is not the best for everyone. For some yes, but not knowing where all that file is going, having a few formats wouldn't be too big of an expectation.

    Now, I do agree using really legacy software, shouldn't be accepting outside files from anyone unless you have the means of reliably getting it down to what you can use on your production software. But again, sending it out in more universal formats with aspects finalized helps preclude this issue in a lot of areas for those that need that.

    I wasn't saying anything of the kind. You really do love your strawman's don't you?

    I'm not talking about if the design that they did will work or not in embroidery (most people would be surprised what will or won't work). That's a whole different issue.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
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