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Printing On Glass

Discussion in 'Flatbed Printers' started by dlndesign, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. dlndesign

    dlndesign Active Member

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    Does anyone have a recommendation for a process or a protective sealer for a reverse print on glass. I runa Teckwin and we did our first test on it and with a scratch test seems to come up easily, wouldn't want to print them and the installer rubs up against a panel and leaves a gash. Thanks.
     
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  2. CS-SignSupply-TT

    CS-SignSupply-TT Very Active Member

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    How soon after the finished print did you run your SCRATCH TEST?
     
  3. dlndesign

    dlndesign Active Member

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    about 10 minutes.
     
  4. g&eprinting

    g&eprinting Member

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  5. dlndesign

    dlndesign Active Member

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    That would help, but we need to see through the glass. Thanks for that video!
     
  6. g&eprinting

    g&eprinting Member

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  7. CS-SignSupply-TT

    CS-SignSupply-TT Very Active Member

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    UV scratching

    I think it is a matter of curing...outgassing...etc. WHY? I have a glass sample printed with the Mimaki UV hybrid printer (including white). The print is awesome and the scratch resistance is amazing.

    By the way, have you had similar scratch issues with other substrates and your printer?
     
  8. MikeD

    MikeD Active Member

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    usually these types of printers have a "clear ink option" for abrasion resistance
     
  9. Jane

    Jane New Member

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    we use precoating when print on glass, ceramics or metal sheets. So after uv printing, it is very resistent. Maybe you can try.
     
  10. Mspec

    Mspec Member

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    I doubt your ink was finished curing after 10 minutes, depending on coverage and density ( probably high in both cases due to printing on glass ) UV ink continues to cure at a molecular level for up to 48 hours depending on your ink and remaining life of your bulbs.

    You can get a better cure if you run the reverse side of the print through a screen printing UV light belt for a couple of passes. If the ink still comes off easily, use an adhesion promoter made for glass. I think Sericol makes a line of UVjet formulated for glass.
     
  11. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    definitely true. i picked up a freshly printed panel printed on an fb700 and put it in my van and continued to drive around town with it back there for the day. i had to keep the windows open because i was getting high.

    so the myth of "instant dry" for UV inks isn't entirely true.

    i'm wondering it this is an HP thing or the CET does the same? (we have a CET fk512 on it's way over here on monday).

    from what i know, if an ink post cures it's a dual cure. ...a mixture of both cationic and free radical.
     
  12. Dave Rowland

    Dave Rowland Member

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    Not a chance with AGFA SS2 ink
     
  13. SFS Production

    SFS Production New Member

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    Does anyone know where to find the Sericol UVijet adhesion promoter for glass or acrylic.
    I can't find at any of our distributors.
     
  14. sharp1

    sharp1 New Member

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    Hi JANE

    Can you please let me know what method / chemical you use in pre-coating?
    We have HP Fb 700, and we are battling to get permanent adhesion.

    HP PT40 Scitex Glass Primer has been recommended but is as yet unavailable in RSA
     
  15. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    looked at the PT40 msds, all it shows is that it has acetone and water in it. i can't imagine that it is acting as a "primer". maybe a precleaner.

    also the HP PT70 polycarbonate primer is nothing but a mild solvent that "opens" up the polycarbonate. not worth purchasing in that it is also
    openly available as a stock item.
     
  16. sharp1

    sharp1 New Member

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    Hi Artbot

    Thanks. I am looking to see if we can get a similar chemical composition without having to wait on HP, as well as related costs.
    Just have not got my hands on any yet. When you say you have 'looked' at PT40, do you have a container ex HP? or was this via the web?

    Opening up or keying the surface is all that will be needed really, so the polycarb chem is probably worth it in the long run.
    I see HP also have primers for melamine etc.

    Ideally I would like to know the chemical composition, as a local chemical supplier here can mix up, no problem. Or alternatively what others may have used with success?
     
  17. sharp1

    sharp1 New Member

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    Found the MSDS for PT40.
    It is Acetic acid and water - <5 to >95

    I think my mom could have told me that the best way to get glass squeaky clean is with water and vinegar :doh:

    Now let's see if it works
     
  18. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    no. the polycarb chemical would not be worth it. if you can figure out a light solvent that just opens up the polycarb for 30 minutes then that's all you need. i've worked with polycarb in another coating process and the lab guys that helped me develop this one coating never said to get some special solvent from them to open up the polycarb, they just said mist some solvent to open up the surface temporarily. which solvent depends on the grade of polycarb and the amount of aggressiveness/etching the surface is preferred equaling the aggressiveness of the adhesion as a result.

    in the meantime we can all start small companies that sell proprietary adhesion promoters like "water and acetone" and "lacquer thinner".
     
  19. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

    3,156
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    Feb 18, 2010
    Houston TX
  20. RyanFelty

    RyanFelty Member

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    Just to throw it out there...we run a CET500 and I print on glass all the time but they are only samples that a company does not put to use (other than to show Target). Thank God, because I still have not found a way to print on glass and not be able to just simply scrape it off with my fingernail...so you are not the only one. I do have sericol and i use that on some boards that do not have great adhesion but good luck using it on a clear substrate. The stuff works amazing but it leaves a sort of fog on the clear material. I am interested to see what people find works best
     
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