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Printing onto MDF

Discussion in 'Flatbed Printers' started by ElJay, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. ElJay

    ElJay Member

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    Sep 17, 2010
    Los Angeles
    I'm trying to print onto black pegboard/MDF on an Oce Arizona 360XT. The ink doesn't want to stick. I've cleaned the board well (50/50 mix Simple Green & water followed by denatured alcohol). Turned the leading lamp off and set the trailing lamp at 7. We're printing three layers of ink. The ink cures, but I can peel it right off.. I tried sanding the board first, as if I was prepping it for paint and that seemed to work okay (I can still scratch it off fairly easily with my fingernail)..But I have 200+ 30" x 30" boards to print. Do I need to spend $400/gal on something called "Adhesion Promoter"..or is it just a matter of messing with the settings a bit (different lamp settings, fewer layers of ink) We've only had this printer for about 2 months so I'm still kind of figuring out what it's capable of. We haven't had any issues like this with any other media.
     
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  2. Mspec

    Mspec Member

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    Jul 7, 2008
    is this stuff true MDF ( made from wood ) or is it more of a plastic composite sheet? You should have good adhesion if it is a wood product, but MDF is blended with various resins, and if the stuff you have is held together with PE resin, that would cause your ink to have less bite. Try shooting it with a black primer spray paint, if the paint can bite the material a bit, it will give the ink more solid footing to hold on to, and would be cheaper than finding an adhesion promoter that works on that product. ( most are made for one type of media in mind, so you would need to find out what exactly your MDF is made out of. )
     
  3. studio 440

    studio 440 Member

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    Jul 19, 2010
    cali
    you may want to use a white primer unless your printer can print white i use an ellis product called hy-lux
     
  4. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    Feb 18, 2010
    Houston TX
    yeah the factory coatings on your material is designed to be somewhat "non" stick. you could try to flame treat it with a big propane torch (the kind you melt driveway ice or melt roof tar). that will alter the surface energy. there are many adhesion promoters but i don't they'd succeed in the task. also you could clear the sheets with CAB lacquer. the cab would have the bite to make a chemical bond with the coating and leave you with a better surface energy for your ink.
     
  5. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    michigan
    If its real MDF all you have to do is spray some zinsser shellac primer (white) on it. Creates a good surface to lay other pigments on it.
     
  6. ElJay

    ElJay Member

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    Sep 17, 2010
    Los Angeles
    Particle board coated on one side with some kind of black laminate.
    We refer to that here as "MDF". Is this correct?
    So basically I'm looking at sanding and priming as if I was going to paint it? Nice...But I guess it's cheaper than "adhesion promoter".

    Thanks, guys...
     
  7. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    Houston TX
    sounds like you are discussing melimine

    Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF)
    MDF is made by breaking softwoods down into individual fibers, which are then glued and pressed together. MDF is denser than particle board and has a smooth finish that takes paint very well, making it a great choice for interior projects. MDF can also be used for built-ins, cabinets, raised panels, or simple furniture.

    Melamine
    Melamine is a type of particle board that has had a plastic coating applied to each face. It is strong and easy to clean, making it a great choice for the interior of cabinets or any surface that needs to be durable.
     
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