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Printing T-Shirt Transfers...

Discussion in 'Gerber' started by Arlo Kalon 2.0, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Arlo Kalon 2.0

    Arlo Kalon 2.0 Very Active Member

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    Oct 21, 2004
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    Is the heat transfer material that can be used on an Edge a really viable approach to tee printing? I'm considering buying inventory to expand in this direction, and am interested in opinions about the quality of doing shirts and caps with an Edge. THANKS!!!
     
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  2. Jen Goodwin

    Jen Goodwin Active Member

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    I have only used SmartBlocker; but there are other products out there. SmartBlocker feels like the transfers from the seventies - heavy; they work great on sweatshirts, but a solid image on a t-shirt is not so appealing. If you can cut it to shape removing a lot of the material they are not so bad. With the smartblocker, you can use your regular foils but with the thinner Gerber product you have to purchase the LT foils. The smartblocker is white, so you can print anything for a dark shirt...the thinner stuff is clear, so you can only print on light or white shirts.
    I think it works well, it prints really nice and it's great for people who only want one or two shirts. It is not cost effective to do a long run; of course.
     
  3. TheDesignShop

    TheDesignShop Member

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    Hey Dave,

    I have a friend who sells the t-jet by US Screenprint. It will print full color work, 1 piece to whatever you need. It's not the fastest but they claim you can get 30 - 40 shirts per hour.

    This will literally dye your fabric, so there are no heavy prints. It doesn't even feel like it's printed. It can print on shirts, towels, baby bibs, and other small clothing items.

    I saw a similar machine sell for $25,000, theirs sell for $10,995.

    If you're interested in a sample or anything, let me know and I'll get a hold of him to send you one.
     
  4. GT

    GT Member

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    With the Gerber transfer foils, you are going to be limited to printing on white and light colored t-shirts. The foils do a reasonable job, but do not have the same durability as screen printing.
     
  5. graphicresults

    graphicresults New Member

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    Check out Stahl's
    We use our Roland PC 60 with it with good success.

    They also have single colors called "Cad Cut" - Great for sports uniforms ect.
     
  6. Jen Goodwin

    Jen Goodwin Active Member

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    That T-jet is cool, Jerid. I'd be interested in a sample! I wonder how these machines will affect the screen biz, or better yet the dye-sub biz!
     
  7. TheDesignShop

    TheDesignShop Member

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    Hi Jen, I don't think these will ever take over the screen printing business. For example, the fastest machine out that does this will print up to 350-400 shirts per hour. This machine also costs $165,000. They also only print on light colors of shirts. I know US Screenprint is making one that will print on darks, but again, it's not here yet.

    So you have a machine that costs $165,000 that can do about 1/3 of the production that an auto screen printing machine for a fraction of that cost. So I don't think these printers will ever take over the industry, but I know they will help get better quality out there. So many printers print and their quality is low. Obviously we can control the quality output for T's. These machines will enable even the least quality minded person to do high quality work!

    Jen, send me your address and I'll email my friend with it.
     
  8. SteveB

    SteveB New Member

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    I know a guy doing several hundred T-shirts a week with an Edge - in fact it's all he does, uses normal foils on 'Gerber colourflex' They look good, a bit heavier than plastisol prints.
     
  9. TheDesignShop

    TheDesignShop Member

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    That's one of the main problems I have with this type of printing. As a matter of fact, I don't do transfers for this reason. Since I got my automatic screen press, the feeling of the print is virtually gone.
     
  10. GT

    GT Member

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    I agree with Jerid. Direct screen printing is still more practical and cost effective. That isn't to say that the new inkjet and transfer technology won't have a place in the industry. I just don't see it replacing screen printing.

    The new techology - as it is today - is better suited for short runs. The problem is that you have to do a lot of short runs in order to recoup your costs and make a profit. Combine that with the high up-front costs and I seriously doubt the T-Jets and other transfer technology are going to be much of a threat to screen printing.
     
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