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Sewing banners

Discussion in 'General Signmaking Topics' started by 702displays, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. 702displays

    702displays Member

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    Feb 2, 2018
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    We are going to start sewing banners because a customer requires Keder to be sewn onto the edge of the banner. I'm hoping I can get some input on what machine will work best. I have a picture attached and it looks like they have 4 rows of stitching holding this keder in place because it gets pulled pretty tight. I'm assuming we'll need a pretty fast double needle machine??? Please help.
     

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  2. tulsagraphics

    tulsagraphics Member

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    That's what it looks like. 2 rows of a double-hem. Probably just adjusting the side stop after the first pass.

    Speed is never a problem with sewing machines. If anything, they need to be throttled (you'll get used to it -- but if multiple people are on the machine -- it's best to change the gearing ratio, or adjust the peddle stop). I'm upgrading my sewing machines right now to an electric Juki with a servo motor so the speed can be set electronically (among other things, like having giant U bobbins). Just about any industrial double-needle walking foot sewing machine will work for your project though. You can pick up a good used machine (preferably 30-40 years old, like a Singer or Mitsubishi if you want an old reliable workhorse without all the bells and whistles), or something newer like a Juki or Seiko. Prices often range from 1.5k-4k respectively for a good used machine+table (keep 'em oiled and they will last forever). Beware of new Singers though -- they are made in China (plastic parts). That's why people like the older ones. Or if you get into new machines with servo motors (i.e, computerized versions with auto-cut, etc) -- those types of features automatically double the cost of the machine ($7-8k). Japan makes great machines (Seiko, Juki), both with and without servos. In any case -- beware of eBay rejects. Always test in person or purchase from a reputable source. Be handy enough to make timing adjustments yourself or check around locally to see if anyone knows how to work on industrial machines.
     
  3. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    I would suggest dual feed if you can get it versus a Walking Foot. Walking foot would be better then nothing, but dual feed is much much better, particularly if pushing some really heavy fabric through.

    Some suggest overlock machines, get a true sewing machine that does a lock stitch. By their very nature, overlock stitches are designed to be pulled out easily (unless you are doing a merrow stitch), think of livestock feed bags and the easy to pull string, same thing. One major advantage of an overlock is no bobbin. If you do go the route of the overlock, make sure to use grommets to help keep the thread from being able to fully pull on out.

    As mentioned, best to test in person and to also hear it run.

    You can get some good computerized new for about 4K that are industrial (industrial Brother and Pfaff).
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  4. tulsagraphics

    tulsagraphics Member

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    Dual feed? Is that the pinch roller behind the machine? I totally forgot about that. I've only used walking foot, but the rear pinch roller thing could help keep those seams straight. I'm about to buy a new (or possibly a very nice used) machine. Money is almost no object (seeing as I was about to purchase a $45k machine with a synchronized conveyor belt before someone else snatched it). I want to get any and every bell and whistle that will speed up production without sacrificing quality.

    I also have a Singer overlock machine, although I don't normally use it. It's nice not having bobbins, but if you break a thread while sewing, it's a b***ch to re-thread. The needles look like giant fangs, and you have to reach under the table with needle nose pliers to reach the backside of each needle. It's a lot like sticking your fist down a Cobra's throat and trying to poke thread back through its nostrils -- in the dark. PITA.
     
  5. tulsagraphics

    tulsagraphics Member

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    In case anyone is wondering -- the Impulsa Synchromatic machine+table combo is the really expensive one I was referring to. Not that I would suggest that for anyone else -- but I would love to get one of these: Talk about full-featured!
     
  6. 702displays

    702displays Member

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    Feb 2, 2018
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    Thanks for this! Can I ask you for some specific brands and models that you would suggest. I've been looking and it's getting overwhelming. I saw the Atlas AT1560 double needle and it looked great but I have a budget of $3k and it's kind of pushing it. I'll be feeding lengths of 10'-15' at a time if that helps and the stitch needs to be durable (not easy to pull out). Thanks for the advice!
     
  7. Merritt Big Color

    Merritt Big Color Merchant Member

    We have an Impulsa with the 10 foot automated belt mainly used for our Dye sub division for Silicon edge graphics (TFD's). The Jukis are used for Banner and we use our for hemming high volume runs as it is way faster than sewing. All serve there own purpose. The Juki 1560 pictured is the one I would suggest for the most versatile use. The Juki 3528 is very nice also but not as industrial. Yes, Impulsa is expensive, I think ours was about $40K with all bells and whistles. Jukis about $3,500 all well worth the investment.
     

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  8. tulsagraphics

    tulsagraphics Member

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    Awesome. Please send me one, along with the table and the building. I could use all of it. Thanks! xD
     
  9. Merritt Big Color

    Merritt Big Color Merchant Member

    No sweat..
     

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  10. BALLPARK

    BALLPARK Member

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    Does anyone suggest a company to use to purchase the threads and needles to hem banners?

    Any suggestions on 3-party accessories that will help with the hem process for 1" standard hem to 4" pole pockets? We are purchasing the Juki LU 1560N unit.

    Thanks!
     
  11. Superior_Adam

    Superior_Adam Member

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    Dec 13, 2017
    Wichita, Kansas
    Juki 1560 double needle with 1/2 spacing and you can sew all day
     
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