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ADA Font Size?

Discussion in 'Fonts and Typography' started by BrianKE, Nov 21, 2008.

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  1. BrianKE

    BrianKE Member

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    Nov 26, 2007
    Columbus, OH
    Anyone know if there is a minimum font size for ADA signs? If so what is the minimum and does it vary by the font used or any other variables?

    TIA
     
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  2. Shovelhead

    Shovelhead Major Contributor

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    5/8"....14 pt and above.
     
  3. BrianKE

    BrianKE Member

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    Nov 26, 2007
    Columbus, OH
    Can you clarify this for me? A 14 pt font is far smaller than 5/8" height. Do you mean that I can use a 14 pt font and stretch it to 5/8" in height or am I missing something?

    Thanks again,
     
  4. Shovelhead

    Shovelhead Major Contributor

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    I was guessing....I hate interior signs.
    Remember the 5/8" though.
     
  5. Rick

    Rick Certified Enneadecagon Designer

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    5/8" using the capital letter "I"

    2" is the maximum.

    There is also stroke to width ratio and letter spacing specifications too
     
  6. Rick

    Rick Certified Enneadecagon Designer

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  7. Shovelhead

    Shovelhead Major Contributor

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  8. Rick

    Rick Certified Enneadecagon Designer

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    it is paths.... cursed computers!!!!

    Try this!!!
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Shovelhead

    Shovelhead Major Contributor

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    fabulous......great tip sheet!!!!!
    :thankyou:
     
  10. rdm01

    rdm01 Very Active Member

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    That is great, thank you for sharing!
     
  11. Bigdawg

    Bigdawg Just Me

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    Thanks for posting Rick. On the height mounting now, I think it's now a range of 48" to 60" where it was standard 60" only before.
     
  12. Rick

    Rick Certified Enneadecagon Designer

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    It is still 60" but equivalent facilitation allows for ranges of 48"-60" You tell a designer or installer that they have that range and signs will be all over the place.

    I pinched this section of article....

    Equivalent facilitation

    This term comes into play when space problems or characteristics of the intended sign's audience limit the effectiveness of normal standards. People who frequent certain buildings may have limited reach or be confined to wheelchairs. The law permits barrier removal in a problem-solving fashion.

    Anyone who's attempted to replace an entire sign system in an older building understands the frustration of not being able to put tactile signs on doors. Sometimes, adjacent space just doesn't exist. For example, an old hotel may willingly replace signs, but can't afford to refinish all the doors. Plus, they would argue that their patrons are accustomed to looking for signs on the doors.

    The new ANSI standards and the proposed ADAAG sometimes offer relief. For example, a tactile sign may be installed on a door that opens inward, has an automatic closer and no hold-open device. Most hotel rooms and apartments pass this test, as do many restroom doors.

    Why the turnaround? The ANSI Sign Task Force realized that, in the above scenario, all its reasons for locating signs on the latch-side wall were invalid. A door that opened inwardly couldn't possibly hit a reader in the face. Because the door couldn't be propped open, it couldn't hide the sign. And although locating signs in the exact same location in every building remains the ideal, it's impractical. Other options might place the sign too far away to be effective. Placement on the door just seemed logical.

    Another location issue involves the 60-inch-on-vertical-center rule, meaning the center of the sign should be at the 5-foot level. New standards will allow tactile characters to be as low as 48 inches in, for example, nursing homes, independent living centers and elementary schools. The 60-inch rule remains in effect, but now there's a clear standard for equivalent facilitation.
     
  13. Bigdawg

    Bigdawg Just Me

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    Gotchya. Not my area of expertise - I just knew I had spotted signs lower then the 60" that were still in compliance. Thanks.
     
  14. thmooch

    thmooch Active Member

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    Thanks for sharing Rick! Great information!

    :U Rock:
     
  15. Checkers

    Checkers Very Active Member

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