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Adding dimension to dimensional letters in proof - Program or technique?

Discussion in 'Designs & Layouts' started by Andy D, Jul 17, 2020.

  1. Andy D

    Andy D Very Active Member

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    I have run across this a couple of times, creating a proof for a monument sign that will have
    dimensional letters with different thicknesses & I want to put an image of their project at an 20 - 45 degree angle to show what the letters will look like at those depths.

    I have tried "Extrude" in Coreldraw and wasn't able to get a satisfactory effect. I can do it in photoshop but
    it's very time consuming. Any tips, tricks or programs anyone can suggest?
     
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  2. shoresigns

    shoresigns Very Active Member

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    If you want to show the relative depth of dimensional letters, you need to show an isometric view, so that all three dimensions/planes are the same scale on the page. 20° or 45° won't do the job here – isometric views are always in 60°/120° with zero perspective.

    Illustrator makes this easy with Effect > 3D > Extrude & Bevel. Isometric views are in the dropdown at the top. Illustrator's 3D effects used to be glitchy, but those problems seem to have faded away in the latest updates. If you do get glitchy rendering, try using the Unite button in the Pathfinder palette to merge/fix your paths. Sometimes bumping the perspective up to 1° will fix things as well (while minimally applying perspective to the rendering).
     
  3. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

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    If you are not afraid to try new things you can do this with a 3d program without too much drama.
    You can export out your paths - 3d them and then get editable paths back into Coreldraw to do your final drawings.
    You can maintain scale jumping back and forth so you can use the dimension tool in Corel for the final.
    Once you play around with it for a bit it is pretty much button-pushing for a few minutes to get what you want.
    This was done with MOI - an inexpensive alternative to Rhino 3d made by one of the original Rhino coders.
    They have a 30 demo you can download to see if it is going to do what you want without brain damage.
    http://moi3d.com/

    Rhino is a step up but will cost more and do a lot of things you don't need it to.
    But it does make nice shop drawings that you can finish up in Corel
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2020
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  4. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

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    File upload is acting wonky
    This is the moi sample Moi.jpg
     
  5. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

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    Rhino sample Rhino 3d.jpg
     
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  6. Raum Divarco

    Raum Divarco Application Specialist CWT / Amcad & Graphics

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    For many proofs, I always like to use SolidWorks. Since we provided scaled drawings for many things I would just import the letters and extrude them up and snap dims to all the features that were relevant.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2020
  7. Zendavor Signs

    Zendavor Signs Member

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    We have started using Fusion360 recently. One of my employees picked it up pretty quickly with no previous 3D software experience. There is some time investment, but IMO it is well worth it especially for higher dollar projects.
     
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  8. Bert Wondervan

    Bert Wondervan Member

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    All you need is:

    Insofta 3D Text Commander
    Insofta Cover Commander

    Try the Trial version:
    https://www.insofta.com/3d-text-commander/

    I made this animation with this software.

    [​IMG]



     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2020
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  9. Evan Gillette

    Evan Gillette Member

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    +1 for Fusion360, it is free for personal use and learning and inexpensive if you decide to get a license. I am sure there are other good options as others mentioned. Onshape is another one I have played with a little bit. I have the benefit of previous modeling experience but most of the simple cad programs are probably easier to learn than graphics programs. As mentioned above the HUGE benefit of adding one of these programs to your quiver is that you can provide technical drawings to both customers and sub-contractors/suppliers in addition to some pretty cool renderings for higher-end projects. Attached is a quick rendering of a preliminary version of a sign we made for our reception area. Note how you can add multiple material finishes, manipulate translucency and add luminosity to simulate real materials and conditions such as backlighting or reverse lighting.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Andy D

    Andy D Very Active Member

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    That's perfect for what I need & you can't beat the price.
    I looked for tutorials but can't seem to find how to import text and shapes into the program.
     
  11. Bert Wondervan

    Bert Wondervan Member

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    These programs are for example and good to start as a beginner. There are even more fun programs that you can professionally create 3d text / animated text.
     
  12. kcollinsdesign

    kcollinsdesign Active Member

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    When I need to demonstrate dimensionality, I use the Illustrator extrude and bevel commands. Very simple. Building a 3D model using Fusion 3D, Blender, Maya or any of the other modeling programs takes far too long. Those products have a place when the budget permits it (making models for commercial production or specialized animation), but for my needs the tools in Illustrator and Photoshop get the job done in a few minutes (the samples below took less than 5 minutes).

    EXTRUSION EXAMPLE.jpg
     
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  13. JBurton

    JBurton Signtologist

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    Am I the only one that does this with sketchup? Export dxf, import into sketchup, plugin called make faces, then the push/pull command to extrude the cabinet, letters, what have yous.
    My biggest obstacle was learning all of the shortcuts, which I finally gave up and wrote my own down then changed all the relevant ones to match. O - orbit, different than R - rotate. Eventually got to where I could put a render together in a few, then just screen shot for customer approval. Have only used it a couple of times for actual production, which was a much more frustrating experience!
    If I could just do it in corel, that would be ideal...
     
  14. Z SIGNS

    Z SIGNS Very Active Member

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    • Like Like x 2
  15. JBurton

    JBurton Signtologist

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