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Anyone use a Digital Torpedo leveler?

Discussion in 'General Signmaking Topics' started by ikarasu, Dec 7, 2017.

  1. ikarasu

    ikarasu Very Active Member

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    Just curious if anyone uses a digital leveler such as:

    https://www.amazon.com/HAMMERHEAD-H...00OZHIGGE/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

    I find when I just use a torpedo level It's never perfectly accurate. It could just be me not used to getting the little bubble perfectly in the center... but I usually end up having to use the level to get it close, then use a Tape measure to get it perfect.

    Apparently these things are accurate to .5 degrees... which would eliminate my tape measuring step. Looks like they always go on sale for $20-30 too, so the price isn't bad... if it works good for decals / wall wraps.
     
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  2. Johnny Best

    Johnny Best Very Active Member

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    Torpedo levels are usually used for putting on top of something to see if it is level. Used it for running sewer lines to make sure of the drop when I was a plumbing contractor years ago. I have one in my bag but only use it in case I forgot to bring my longer level. And yes they are a little off if you use them for lining up copy on a glass office door, they are too short. Do not use the tape measure because I have run across crooked doors. But using the 24" level always makes it easier.
    Would be curious how the digital level works so if you get one please post back how good or bad it was. Just never wanted to spring that much money (the one I saw was like $35) for a small level when the longer one works well for me.
     
  3. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    In my opinion, just a gimmick. We have one and I think I can count on one hand, how many times its been used. In a pinch, they're probably alright, but that small a run.... I wouldn't count on it. Then again, I wouldn't count on using a tape measure, either. Some of my best levels are very very old. They were my grandfather's. Absolutely, dead balls on.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2017
  4. Z SIGNS

    Z SIGNS Very Active Member

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    I use my cell phone for a level
     
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  5. Johnny Best

    Johnny Best Very Active Member

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    I actually tried that app but the manual level was faster and easier.
     
  6. ikarasu

    ikarasu Very Active Member

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    They also make them bigger, if you guys don't like the small ones.

    https://www.amazon.com/24-Inch-Prof...&qid=1512748047&sr=8-8&keywords=digital+level

    Most of the stuff I do is small - We wrap a lot of utility boxes, CNG pumps, or small car decals. Usually it's a full wrap, with a small 12-20" sign dead center. Or a 10f pieces with a small 10" section of text. So we usually just bring the small level + Tape measure.

    Tape measure is mainly to make sure it's level with the box - A lot of the Gas utility boxes were put in the ground at an angle, or shifted over the years... only way to make it level is to measure the distance from the top to the text on both edges of the wrap.

    I'll likely buy one once I see it go on sale - Even just to hang picture frames at home, at $20-30 it's not that much of a waste. I mainly decided to ask because we had a job putting 12" high vinyl around a couple hundred feet of building, so I decided to buy a laser level, because of course it'd be easier... I ended up not using it at all. I see all these "Fancy toys" and end up buying them, only to throw them in a drawer and go back to the tried and tested method people have been using for 100 years.
     
  7. Johnny Best

    Johnny Best Very Active Member

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    I use the water level method for fence posts and painted wall signs to get them to line up. That method has been around for thousands of years. Always kept the hose in my truck when doing wall signs years ago.
    Whenever I put copy down I play a game to put it down first where I think it is level then use the level or tape measure to see how close I came. Over the years I have developed a pretty good eye for accuracy.
    Probably have a bubble in my skull cavity that moves back and forth.
     
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  8. rjssigns

    rjssigns Major Contributor

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    I have the digital level from Sears. Bought it on sale years back for $15. Put it on a surface plate and checked it against a high dollar digital angle gauge. It read exactly the same. Shop owner was surprised.

    Only time I use it is when I'm leveling equipment or things where I can't see the top surface. Set it to chirp when it's dead level. Real time saver.
     
  9. ikarasu

    ikarasu Very Active Member

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    Of course the one I saw on sale yesterday is now double the price oh well. I'll wait, it's winter and not many installs right now. Think I'll give one a try though... If it works good, I'll buy the bigger versions too.

    Thanks for all the replies! I'm sure it's a gimmick. Maybe I'll use it alot, maybe it'll sit in a bag for months. At $30 it's not that big of a risk.
     
  10. DerbyCitySignGuy

    DerbyCitySignGuy Very Active Member

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    I did construction for many years and we had one for a bit. They may have gotten better over the years, but back then they were junk. I have to assume they still are.
     
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