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Circle pattern

Discussion in 'Gerber Omega, Graphix Advantage & MacImprint' started by Dropout, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. Dropout

    Dropout Member

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    Jun 4, 2009
    Good evening All.

    Is there an easy way to place a number of small circles (the centre point of the cirlces, not the edges) evenly spaced around a larger circle?

    Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. iSign

    iSign Major Contributor

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    if you use illustrator, one way is to set the larger circle first, then use the text-on-a-path tool, enter a bullet point as your text (see keycaps, if you need to, or some kind of symbol or dingbat font)... then just play with the point size of the font, & the kerning, to get the right size and quantity of circles, & to get the start & end point to match the spacing of the rest.
     
  3. Dropout

    Dropout Member

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    Thanks.

    I forgot to mention I use Omega 2.1.

    Dropout
     
  4. iSign

    iSign Major Contributor

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    well... my next suggestion is to get a friend to set it up in illustrator & import it into omega :thumb:

    (I'm sure it could be done mulitple ways in omega... I just use mine for setting up edge print jobs from illustrator files, so I haven't learned the more obscure design tools)
     
  5. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    • Draw a circle the size you want it and duplicate it (Control+9)
    • Move the second circle to the opposite side
    • Set both circles approximately where you want them
    • Justify them one one axis and group them
    • Duplicate the grouped circles and rotate the duplicate by an number of degrees of a circle that is a multiple of 360 degrees
    • Center-Center justify the two groups of circles
    • Repeat until you have completed the circle
     
  6. Bob Gilliland

    Bob Gilliland Member

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    May 23, 2003
    Depending on the design and desired result, there is another direction that can be utilized. Let’s take a look at that then review some plus and minus issues for each afterwards.

    Depending on the design, another possible choice is Fit Text/Shape to Path (Tools> Fit Text/Shape to Path). For illustration purpose, let’s say you have thirteen (13) six inch (6”) circles you desire to place around a fifty inch (50”) diameter circle.

    Here are the steps as I would approach this

    • Draw a 3” circle
    • Tools>Advance Repeat fourteen times (there is a reason for 14 and not 13)
    • In the Advanced Repeat (or Repeats/Merge could be used or Duplicate) dialog box, Gap or Center to Center and the actual distance is not overly relevant; just about any selection/distance will work
    • Draw a 50” diameter circle
    • Select the 50” circle and then the fourteen six inch circles
      **order of selection is important **first item selected will be the path to which all other selected objects will be placed **
    • Tools> Fit Text/Shape to Path
    • Select all 6” circles; [F2]
    • Select Space Tool; [CTRL]+[K]
    • Select Left Justify; [L]
    • Left click and drag the last circle to be placed directly on top of the first circle
    • Once they are aligned, OK; [ENTER]
    • OPTIONAL: If you don’t want to see the large circle back on the drawing board, select Hide Path; [H]
    • Back on the drawing surface, select “one” of the overlapping circles and [DELETE]
    • Done!

    Once you are use to the work flow, it’s a very quick and efficient operation that requires little math or deep thought. The fourteenth circle is nothing more then an alignment aid. If you desired to have six circles, you would start with seven. Add one additional object to the final desired amount, use it for alignment, and then delete it once returned to the drawing board.

    Ah, but wait; you desire for the circles to align on the centerline and not the edges. As seen during the above example, FTP uses the edges for placement (inside or outside of path). One does have the ability to manipulate this to some degree with the FTP dialog, however, for ease of use (and not the focus of this post), let’s do the math and get the large circle to the proper size before going into the FTP dialog box.

    In this example, the small circles will be placed to the outside of the large circle. That being stated, we need to reduce the overall diameter of the larger circle by the radius of the small circle, times two (half a circle from one side and half from the opposite side). So the radius of the 6” circle is 3”, times two is 6”. Subtract 6” from the 50” and you need to start with a 44” circle. Go through the exercise above again; however, use a 44” large circle for the path and the final thirteen smaller circles will be centerline “aligned” for a 50” circle.

    Fit Text/Shape to Path (FTP) can be beneficial in some situations and not so much in others. The points below are not all inclusive by any means.

    • When there are an “odd” number of circles, FTP can be a time savor.
    • Reduces how much math needs to be done by the designer, rather, places that burden on the software.
    • If it’s more for visual aesthetics rather then mechanical needs.
    • In most situations, it’s quicker and requires less work on the designer’s part.

    I like and have used Fred’s method (or variants of it) many times through the years. One of the negatives, from my perspective anyway, of using FTP is “precision”. If needing something “mechanical” looking, or actually mechanically placed (thinking CNC based machining here), FTP may not be the best option. If that is desired I usually opt for a method more similar to what Fred outlined above. One of the liabilities, or hardships, when needing to work “in precision” is the burden placed on the designer to do much of the math.

    Nice thing about software is that there is usually more then one way to get to an end destination. :Big Laugh One bad thing about software today is that there is usually more then one way to get to an end destination. :Big Laugh The path chosen is usually dependent upon two influential items; the actual design/requirements of the design and secondly, the designers knowledge of the software. There are times I like to drive to a destination; there are times I like to bike to it; every now and then I prefer to walk. All serve a purpose with positive and negative implications but all allow me to end up at the same place eventually.
     
  7. Dropout

    Dropout Member

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    Jun 4, 2009
    Hi Fred.

    Worked great!

    Thanks!

    Dropout
     
  8. Pat Whatley

    Pat Whatley Major Contributor

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    If you run into trouble get in touch with Rick. He's Certified.
     
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