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Corel Draw 2018 Laptop Build - ????

Discussion in 'Corel' started by 54warrior, Mar 28, 2019.

  1. 54warrior

    54warrior Member

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    It's time to update to a new computer. I am currently using a 10 year old desktop that a friend helped me build. I have since relocated and I am not comfortable building a machine myself.

    I would like to upgrade to a newer/faster machine with Win 10. Leaning towards a laptop, due to the flexibility of it. Anyone familiar with docking stations and dual monitor setup?

    What specs would you all recommend? I'll be running Corel Draw 2018

    SSD, how big?
    how much RAM?
    I read something that mentioned the new Corel does not like AMD processors and an Intel Core i5/i7 should be used. Is that true?

    Thanks!! Any info/advice/recommendations is appreciated.
     
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  2. De.signs Nanaimo

    De.signs Nanaimo Member

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    I run windows 10 and Corel on my old iMac, run better than any set up I have used before. The iMac is 8 years old runs on an Intel Core i5 but has 12GB RAM, whatever you get get lots of RAM!! I also run it on my Mac Book Pro for travelling and working, the only hiccup is my older Corel x5 does not support the retina display, but the 2018 will support that once I upgrade eventually.
     
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  3. White Haus

    White Haus Formally known as RJPW..........

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    I just got one of these for work https://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX70670

    I also upgraded to 16GB of RAM and it hauls ***. Fastest laptop I've ever had/used. Runs Quickbooks/Excel/CorelDraw/Illustrator at the same time no problem. Haven't tried pushing it with Photoshop yet but I'm sure it can handle it.

    I'd also be interested in hearing about docking stations as I've got a dual monitor set up I want to use with this thing when I'm in the office.
     
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  4. unclebun

    unclebun Very Active Member

    Personally I hate working on laptops and I hate their unreliability and inability to be upgraded.

    Although my workstation only has a 500GB SSD, I actually store all my sign layout files and photos and clipart, etc. on a server, so if I had to have all of it on one computer, I would need a 1TB SSD to have plenty of empty space for future growth and for computing headspace. (This is after 13 years in business)

    16GB of RAM. Or 32 GB even.

    We use Corel 2018 with an AMD Ryzen, and see no problems whatsoever. If there is any rationale to what you've heard it would relate to the fact that a lot of the Ryzen's computing prowess comes from its multithreading ability rather than raw clock speed and speculative execution. And graphics programs are downright backwards when it comes to using multithread processing. That said, the Ryzens are still fast, and the Intel core processors have had some of their performance advantage taken away because of all the exploits of their insecure speculative processing. And recently Intel has been unable to advance their fab technology and is having trouble producing their topline processors. So really, it doesn't matter. However, if you're buying a laptop you'll probably end up with an Intel just because that's what laptop maufacturers tend to offer in most of their lines.
     
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  5. bannertime

    bannertime "You guys do banners, right?"

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    8gb ram would be an absolute minimum. 16gb would be the most reasonable. 32gb is possible, but not really necessary right now. I run an 8th gen i7, 16gb 2666hz ram, and an SSD and it runs without a hitch.
     
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  6. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    Is the dual monitor using the laptop screen as one of those monitors or a dual external monitor setup?

    Be mindful of the graphics specs of whatever laptop you are getting and the specs of the monitor(s) that you will be using with it.

    RAM and SSD size, I always subscribe to the "better to have it and not need it then to need it and not have it" philosophy. Can be quite expensive, but it hasn't let me down yet.

    You are sacrificing for the form factor. I have a laptop (had enough inputs that I didn't need a docking station for) as a travel computer and I would hook up a 12WX as the second monitor and it's OK, but I don't exactly suggest it for a main workstation for this type of work, but that's just me.

    I second storing work files on a server rather then on an individual machine. Especially if said machine has something that goes wrong with it unexpectedly.

    As to exploits, depending on which exploit talking about, some actually affect Intel, AMD and even ARM (which this last one is moot for this discussion). I will say this, some of the Intel performance drop is actually mitigated with how Linux handles the exploits and attaches it only to programs that would need that mitigation. Yet another reason why I like running Linux versions Windows (or Mac), but I digress as that wouldn't do much for you in this discussion (unless going the VM route, in which case, I would double whatever specs you are thinking for your laptop as you'll be effectively running 2 computers versus just 1).


    A couple of other thing to consider, with the telemetry of Win 10 (security concerns aside and even just with Basic telemetry), when it compiles that telemetry and deploys it, that will affect performance. The more you try to get just the sufficient specs, the more noticeable it is. I would also suggest making sure that you get Win 10 Pro versus Home, unless you want to be apart of the upgrade guinea pig population. At least there is some ability to defer updates.
     
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  7. 54warrior

    54warrior Member

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    It would be a true dual monitor setup with the laptop lid closed.
     
  8. bannertime

    bannertime "You guys do banners, right?"

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    That might be a bit much unless you have an actual graphics card. I run an external monitor that monitor runs off the Nvidia 1060 and the laptop runs off the integrated Intel chip. Haven't tried two externals. You'd need to make sure it has two display ports. Either DisplayPort, HDMI or even a USB C/3.0 port that supports HDMI or DP protocol.
     
  9. mfatty500

    mfatty500 Active Member

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    How do you use the keyboard with the lid closed?
     
  10. bannertime

    bannertime "You guys do banners, right?"

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    External mouse and keyboard.
     
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  11. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    Yes and no.

    You'll want to make sure that it has 2 ports for external monitors, but it also has to support running 2 external monitors at one time. Even with shutting off the laptop screen, it may or may not be able to handle running 2 external monitors (and depending on their specs as well).
     
  12. bannertime

    bannertime "You guys do banners, right?"

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    That was why I mentioned a dedicated graphics card. If the laptop had a 1050ti, 1060 or 1070 maxq then I don't see why it shouldn't be able to handle it. If they are only using an Intel Integrated, most likely not. Really depends on the budget.

    Also, I've seen a few models that have the new 2060 cards, and that'd be cool, but not necessary right now either. Best bang for the buck is going to be an outgoing 16gb ram laptop with a 6gb 1060 and i7.
     
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  13. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    I gotcha now. I must have just got hung up on the integrated portion.


    This would cost, but I would go with the P72 with a Quadro P5200 and max it out with 64GB of ECC RAM.

    Personally (I'm probably the only one in the group that would do this), I would install an XFCE based distro (very light weight DE, it idles at 500MB of RAM with stock settings, for a 64 bit OS that's really good) in place of Win 10 and just VM whatever Windows version I need if I had to have a Windows only program on there.
     
  14. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    I used to have that attitude a long time ago. I still prefer to use a desktop PC for my office workstation during the day. If I'm going to do creative work at home I use either a notebook PC or an iPad Pro now. I haven't purchased a desktop PC to use at home in 20 years.

    My reasons for preferring to use a notebook at home: after working at a computer desk 8-10 hours all day the last thing I want to do is come home and sit at another computer desk. I'd prefer to at least be able to sit on the couch in the living room or maybe even go somewhere away from home while using the computer.

    A notebook computer can last a long time if it is configured properly from the start. I've been using my current notebook (a Dell XPS 15" unit) since the Summer of 2011. After 8 years I'm finally at the point where I'm shopping around for a replacement. The notebook I used previous to that was another Dell 15" model that lasted 6 years.

    Regarding upgrades, some notebooks can have components upgraded. You just have to be willing to take apart the machine to do it. I replaced a faulty monitor in the 2000's era Dell that I had (a friend mailed me a Dell Latitude notebook part that would fit; I went from 1680 X 1050 resolution to 1920 X 1200). There are plenty of notebook reviews (and review videos) these days where the reviewers will open the case to show off what can be upgraded or replaced by the user. Apple's notebooks tend to really suck in this regard. Most components are glued or soldered in permanently; they want you spending big $$$ to send in a notebook to get anything at all done to it. Combine that with the keyboard fiasco. They're just a bad buy.

    One thing I do find annoying with notebooks is the pricing. There seems to be a pretty narrow barrier in many product lines where if you want just one thing beefed up a good bit (such as going from a puny 4-8GB amount of RAM up to something like 32GB) you're forced into a very costly product line. It doesn't take much for a $1400 notebook to suddenly cost upwards of $3000 or more.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2019
  15. unclebun

    unclebun Very Active Member

    When I finally go home at the end of the day, I'm done working. I don't want to continue to do work, and neither does my wife. I do use a desktop computer at home too, for email, and for working on my Bible study lessons for church. I have a laptop, but I hate sitting on a couch to actually do work with it. The position is ergonomically bad and you end up with neck and backaches. And if you put the laptop on a table, it's too high for good typing. Not to mention the slightly smaller keyboard that screws up your finger memory.
     
  16. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    To the OP, if this is a concern here when/if detaching from the docking station:


    I would make sure to get a full size keyboard. 90% full size, I've personally never had a problem with (now netbook size keyboards is another story), but I would make sure about that. Of course, that may limit you on size as well for the laptop. Just depends on what is more important.
     
  17. 54warrior

    54warrior Member

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    Wow! Thank you all for the outpouring of excellent responses. I truly appreciate the information. There is a lot to ponder now, LOL

    I had never considered that a graphics card and two monitors might be an issue.

    Furthermore, 95% of the time, the laptop would be in the "docked" position with the lid closed, using a normal keyboard and mouse. The other 5% of time would be using the laptop to go to customers, which I try not to do.
     
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