Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Creating FILM POSITIVES on Large Format Printer

Discussion in 'Screen Printing' started by Lifer, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. Lifer

    Lifer New Member

    18
    0
    1
    Jul 13, 2011
    Nebraska
    We Screen print and do digital signs in house. Our Laser printer (11x17) which we've been using to make film positives for shirt screen printing for 12+ years is nearing the end.

    In researching printers - I found an EPSON 4900 Bundle with ACUPRINT RIP software (for making the halftones). Since this is a Deskjet - and I have a 48" wide Valujet printer setting here already - I wondered why I can't make Film Positives with it.

    Does anyone us their Large format printer for creating FILM POSITIVES?
    If YES:
    Q1: What do you use for Film? (vendor didn't know if ECOSOLVE ink would degrade their waterbased film)
    Q2: What do you use for RIP SOFTWARE?
     
    Tags:
  2. Masseria

    Masseria Member

    141
    1
    0
    Jul 23, 2012
    i've tried on a mimaki jv33-160... not worth it..
    great definition, but i didnt get to the dark black i wanted to.
    You might fix this with profiles, but i dont recommend buying a LFP for printing films.
    except you make this for living and you print at least 100 mts a day.
     
  3. gabagoo

    gabagoo Major Contributor

    5,430
    61
    48
    Oct 10, 2006
    Vaughan, Ontario
    my screen printer bought a used Epson (water based) and he prints on a clear film for shooting screens. I think they load all black cartridges instead of cmyk. The ink is pricey for 220 ml's but he uses it quite a bit so I think it is worth it to not have to deal with ruby and vinyl.
     
  4. mopar691

    mopar691 Member

    390
    0
    16
    Sep 15, 2010
    Your ink will not be opaque enough. I use a epson 1100 with a different ink set also.
     
  5. Lifer

    Lifer New Member

    18
    0
    1
    Jul 13, 2011
    Nebraska
    What do you use for RIP SOFTWARE? (I have Ghostscript installed and can print halftones to any printer with it from CorelDraw).

    What 'ink set' do you use?

    What FILM do you use? (this is the big one. One vendor has film but its Close to $3/ 11" x 17" sheet.)
     
  6. mopar691

    mopar691 Member

    390
    0
    16
    Sep 15, 2010
    I use accurip

    I use Pigment ink, all black cis. Ink from Cobra

    Ritefilm waterproof film.

    Never had any problem with this setup, been using for about 2 years. Great halftones and super opaque films once the rip is set up for density. Slow on printing (typical 12 x 12 takes about 10 min to print one film) but works awesome.
     
  7. Edna

    Edna Member

    196
    0
    0
    Oct 9, 2012
    why not just get another laser printer. In the long run it will be easiler and cheeper that trying to rig up a printer that is not indended for such perposes as printing film positaves. A good 11x17 PS laser is only $2,500 or so.
     
  8. jsmoritz2000

    jsmoritz2000 Very Active Member

    We use the Epson Artisan 1430 with Black Maxx ink system and AccuRip software. I love it. It's a real time saver, works flawlessly, and creates very dark, detailed negatives. We got it as a bundle package through Ryonet and it also came with Seperation Studio software too. All in all it's a great deal for around $2,200. It's actually on sale right now from Ryonet for $1699.
     
  9. ChicagoGraphics

    ChicagoGraphics Major Contributor

    4,747
    45
    48
    Feb 27, 2007
    World
    Theres a white paper you can use too and use your wide format printer to print on it but I for got what it's called. if it comes to me I will post it or you can look online. the paper is transpearent almost like tracing paper
     
  10. Vital Designs

    Vital Designs Vital Designs

    406
    1
    18
    May 29, 2005
    Dalls, Texas
    I went down this road a couple of years ago and the 4900/AccuRip is the way to go. I actually got wasatch softrip and AccuRip and prefer AccuRip. I use Accuink with Ulano pigment inkjet film on a 4880. Dark blacks and great halftones.
     
  11. FireSprint

    FireSprint Very Active Member

    Hands down the way to go. We use an all black system with refillable cartridges - dye based ink. We use an Epson 7800. (You can find them used - 7880, 9800 9800 or 7800)

    I wouldn't think of printing them any other way. Once we switched to this system there was no more pain on that side of production...ever.

    We also use accurip which seems to work very well with the Epson.
     
  12. headfirst

    headfirst Member

    49
    0
    0
    Dec 16, 2011
    The problem with laser is that the fuser will stretch the films a slight amount. On spot color jobs you might never notice it. But try a 6 color sim process or a CMYK print and you'll notice it while registering.

    That being said we use laser because we have a good copier for it. When we have to do complex films I have a friend run it on their inkjet with wasatch. It works much better.
     
  13. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

    5,780
    21
    38
    Oct 19, 2009
    Nerbaska

    Vellum? The ink still need to be dark to expose a screen.
     
  14. Ditchmiester

    Ditchmiester Active Member

    711
    0
    16
    Mar 24, 2011
    Oswego, IL
    I use an Epson 7890 With Accurip and it works great. I was wondering if it is possible to print film on an my L26500 in the rare case I need to be able to print a piece of film that is bigger on both sides than 24 inches that the epson can print.
     
  15. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

    5,780
    21
    38
    Oct 19, 2009
    Nerbaska
    My cure was to call Firesprint and have them screen stuff...
     
  16. Mike001

    Mike001 Member

    45
    0
    6
    Jan 15, 2013
    New Zealand
    Mimaki JV33

    I use my Mimaki JV33 160 for making film with very good success.. (using SS21 solvent ink)
    I can produce halftones seps (successfully up to 85lpi ruling), and solids that are as black as anyone would need.
    I tested by leaving a screen shooting for 40 mins from a 5000 watt exposure unit and there was no sign of light bleeding through.
    The screen images washed out sharp and easily.

    There was a bit of initial trial and error setting up a profle in the beginning but I haven't looked back since then... and its saved me a fortune in outsourcing large film requirements.
    I have produced film for large real estate signs, 2.5 meters x 1.2 meters, with bitmap images etc.
    Works very well and I also do film for other printers.

    so yep, as long as you get your profiles correct it does a fantastic job.

    just my 2 cents
     
  17. MikePro

    MikePro Major Contributor

    4,397
    83
    48
    Feb 3, 2010
    Racine, WI
    i will most likely give it a try on my hp26500 this week, setting print with "high ink levels", and my mimaki jv3160sp with double-striking the ink.
    if I cannot get it to work, then I'm gonna just have to suck it up and get a laser printer.... cutting/weeding rubylith has gotten old, and I'm on the verge of making approx. 1000 photopolymer ADA signs in the next month, all different room #'s/copy.
     
  18. knucklehead

    knucklehead Active Member

    629
    0
    0
    Sep 24, 2007
    I just sold my old Epson 7000 dye printer to a guy for that exact reason. I used to print films for some screen printers after I quit screen printing. They were more than thrilled at the films coming of the dye printer. Can't beat it in my book.
     
  19. mopar691

    mopar691 Member

    390
    0
    16
    Sep 15, 2010
    I make alot of one-offs on my mutoh, just print on Laminate, stick it to the emulsion and burn the screen. It is much cheaper than waterproof film and if it is just one or 2 color with loose registration works very well.
     
  20. arzu

    arzu Member

    36
    2
    0
    Dec 29, 2013
    fot your info: we use a film-plotter the old fashion way. The best quality regarding opacity and precision.
    However you need an old filmplotter and development-hardware.

    I calculated and compared with inkjet-printed films, and even with the chemicals (+deposition of them) needed, the film method is cheaper than when printing it.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

 


Loading...