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Suggestions Design Computer - Hardware

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware' started by Mattie_BR, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. Mattie_BR

    Mattie_BR Member

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    Nov 19, 2014
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    Hello!

    We have a new design station in our company and need a fast, efficient and reliable computer.

    Budget is a concern, but I understand it's an investment and the right choice now will save time and make us more efficient later on.

    Which hardware setup would you recommend? I am budgeting $1500

    Thank-you!!
     
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  2. rjssigns

    rjssigns Major Contributor

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    Our latest has an AMD Black Series processor, 8 gigs of RAM, and a 256G SSD. Don't remember the brand of the mobo. It rips. Running Win 7 Pro. Local shop built it for just over a grand.
     
  3. Chasez

    Chasez Member

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    In the midst of building new design computer myself.

    Asus ROG Maximus IX Hero mobo
    Intel Core i7-7700K processor
    Kingston HyperX fury 32gb RAM
    Samsung 850 EVO SSD 250GB
    WD 1TB HDD
    Maxtor 250GB HDD (SATA2 from old computer for Scratch disk)
    x2 EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 3GB video cards
    win 10 (unfortunately - all new Intel processors are win 10 only)
    + all the other minor parts to put it all together

    Is running higher than your budget but will definitely boot! I would think about budget vs how much time will be spent sitting around waiting for the pc to process graphics etc.. Your hardware will also be determined by the type of graphics you're trying to handle. If you're not big into HQ images but just vector files this machine would be overkill for you and you can handle an I5 processor and a different mobo and 8gb ram easy. I would check with a local store and let them know your requirements and budget and they can put something together for you.

    Chaz
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    The biggest thing here is what you are wanting to run on the rig.

    What works for one, may not work for the next and vice versa.

    Although, I tend to subscribe to the "better to have it and not need it then to need it and not have it", but that is an expensive motto to live by.

    That's why I love running Linux hosts with Windows VMs. I can run everything from Win 98 to Win 8.1 all on the same computer and don't have to worry about that Win 10 thing (ironically, I don't mind the OS from a usability standpoint, there are just other things that I don't like). But I also use workstation computers, xeon processors with ECC ram.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Mattie_BR

    Mattie_BR Member

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    Nov 19, 2014
    Florida
    Thank-you for the answers!
    Appreciate it - I guess I should look at the long-term and all savings a robust machine can provide against time lost in front of a frozen screen!
     
  6. Marlene

    Marlene Major Contributor

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    talk to Casey at Signburst.com we bought one of his computers and it was the best thing we ever did. also, his customer support is amazing.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  7. Chasez

    Chasez Member

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    I don't mind win 10 either (run it on my surface book) as an OS but have never run it in a production environment and from what I've heard it can be disastrous (granted last I heard that was when win 10 was first released). As far as running a Linux host with VMs... that would be out of my knowledge base and there's not enough time to learn that with the way things are going these days! I've played around with vm ware before but not enough to setup something like that. Seems like you would need some Linux knowledge and know how to run that setup smoothly.

    Chaz
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    3 of the desktops that I use, have a very Win 10 look about them. It's not all the way there (live tiles etc, it's like a combo of Win 10 and Win 7 Start panel), so I do like the Windows paradigm, I just don't like their philosophy with their flagship OS and how it does.

    In my opinion, it still is disastrous. Now granted, I can understand update issues with Windows given how many different hardware/software combos that are out there with Windows. But this latest iteration of having a couple of major builds twice a year and the major builds going EOL every 18 months has effectively made it a rolling release distro (shoot Fedora only has an lifespan of 13 months, not much more then an OS that is known for being bleeding edge, and I did run that on production computers for a couple of yrs). That isn't good for production, probably ok for the vast amount of everyday users, but not in a production environment.

    Shoot, I have quite a few newsfeeds of software vendors and hardware vendors on FB that make the wares for both (sometimes all 3 major PC OSs) and even with High Sierra coming out, they said not to upgrade to it until patches are made. So even within the Mac ecosystem it happens. Happens with all of them, I just think it's more of an issue with Windows due to all the different combos out there.

    Don't get me wrong, I firmly believe in keeping up to date, but I do not believe in updating whenever MS has deemed it worthy to upgrade and forces it on me. That is not good for production. They can deprecate and remove anything that they want in an upgrade that could stall anyone's business and that would force you to upgrade or what until that vendor can send out a fix. That's no bueno at all.

    Truth be told, I firmly believe that production rigs shouldn't be online to begin with, but with SaaS really taking off (horrid in of itself) that precludes that option for quite a few people. Hence going the VM route as long as those programs are still viable, may not always be the case, but I'm holding out as long as efficiency and productivity don't take a nose dive.


    It's not like 10 yrs ago. It really has come a long way and yea, there would be some googling, but fairly easy to setup. I use VirtualBox though. I have used VMWare and it's good, but again, run some of the same issues with deprecation that I may not want. With VirtualBox I can get the source code and compile if I need to maintain an older version to still have support for my VMs on a newer OS. Hasn't happened, but I always like to have a Plan B.

    While I would suggest GNU/Linux in a heartbeat and just VM either Windows or Mac to use whatever programs are absolutely necessary, if one isn't ready to deal with a little bit of change and muddle through it don't do it. It's gotten easier, but have to have the right frame of mind. But my word, have a lot more options and power with the Linux OS then with Windows, but that does mean breakage if one isn't careful.
     
  9. Chasez

    Chasez Member

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    I'm always open to trying new things that will increase productivity etc (doesn't hurt that I'm a bit of a techie/geek) but I just don't have the time take on something else like that. Currently polishing up on web development skills as well as working on a new custom workflow program for our company on top of the normal day to day chaos; the time to learn something completely new would put me even further back than I already am. Not saying that I wouldn't be open to the idea in the future because I completely am, have read a few articles on linux in the past and would love to get used to the OS.

    Chaz
     
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