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Does this look adequate???

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Enola, Nov 4, 2019.

  1. Enola

    Enola Member

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    I'm looking to build this structure out of 6x6x16 post with an added 2x6x16, mostly for aesthetic value, but Im sure it helps with structural integrity also.

    So, is 6x6 post a good way to approach this size of a sign structure?
    Are the 30" holes with 4 foot of post embedded sufficient for the above ground square footage and windload?


    A side note: I was contemplating capping the post with 1/2" pvc.
     

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  2. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    All sounds good to me. I might go another foot deeper, though. Aslo, I'd have the posts above the sign by 2" or 3", rather than flat across the top. I don't know if I'd cap redwood posts. They're a thing of beauty.
     
  3. Texas_Signmaker

    Texas_Signmaker Very Active Signmaker

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    Looks good to me. If it was permanent I'd look into aluminum but that's kind of more expensive...but your structure looks fine.
     
  4. Billct2

    Billct2 Major Contributor

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    looks ok to me also
     
  5. Enola

    Enola Member

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    Gino being Gino.
    My inlaws have been in the "lumber yard / sawmill" business for 3 generations. They are in the top 10 largest this side of the Mississippi.
    They do have an impressive stockpile of old product, although I don't think they would be receptive to using any of their supply for sign posts to be buried in concrete.

    I don't think I'll be using any for this project, but If you're in the market, I can put in a good word for you )
     
  6. kcollinsdesign

    kcollinsdesign Active Member

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    If that were my job, I would use steel tube and clad with cedar for appearance. When doing the windload calculations I came up with a minimum required elastic section modulus (" cubed) of 3.75, which would allow the use of 4x4 x .188 commonly available square steel tube. Remember that all the forces from the windload will be concentrated at the point the supports are embedded, which is also the place water will accumulate and be the first place to rot. I would be comfortable using 6x6 cedar under 8' in this application, bit would likely use 4x4 GC treated and clad with cedar. Depending on your soil conditions, 24" diameter holes 54" in the ground should be sufficient (put some gravel in the bottom). That will end up being a yard of concrete, which in my experience will be sufficient (an engineer would probably want more ballast, depending on their "safety" parameters and risk tolerance). Please note that I am not an engineer and my advice is for conversation purposes only.
     
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  7. Enola

    Enola Member

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    What dimension of "aluminum" would you use for THIS project Tex?
    I'm not real familiar with the strength of aluminum to erect a 12 foot (16') post with this much windload.
    I would have thought steel would be a better, cheaper and stronger choice??? No?

    I have built some directional signs (school, hospital type) using 4" & 6" square aluminum posts. The largest of those was close in size to this one, although they were "ground" signs that were only head high.

    ps. I have a wonderful Welding / Fabrication shop about 5 miles away from me. I only do some light weigh welding in house (only if it won't be seen. LOL it ain't pretty, but it is strong)
     
  8. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Oops, my bad. Fort some reason, I thought it said redwood posts. Yeah, go ahead and wrap them.
     
  9. unclebun

    unclebun Very Active Member

    Using the engineering calculator I rely on, a 6x6 treated Yellow Pine post is only 45% utilized for that sign, when set in a 24" diameter hole 38" deep. That's based on our maximum wind of 90 mph. So what you're planning would be good. Personally, for that height of sign I'd take the hole to 48" if the ground conditions allow.
     
  10. ddarlak

    ddarlak Trump Hater

    i don't understand the extra 2x6 is for, i don't see that adds anything for aesthetic value.

    If you know someone with a sawmill just get a 6x8x16 cut
     
  11. heyskull

    heyskull Very Active Member

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    Looks good to me.

    I fitted a sign many years ago which was 32' x 8' Aluminium on rails with five 8" galvanised posts in 5' concrete with frame reinforcement.
    It was fitted on top of a hill in the worst weather you can imagine gales,pouring rain, etc.
    Got a phone call the falling morning that the sign had moved!!!
    Arrived on site to find the sign had moved back and down the hill 24"
    This was because of the wet ground, position and the wind.
    Strangley it was still perfectly vertical and has been for the last 14 year.
    I checked with my friend on wind loading and base sizes and he reckoned the base was to heavy and had created the issue.
    So sometimes you can over engineer an item and it will fail.

    SC
     
  12. FireSprint.com

    FireSprint.com Trade Only Screen & Digital Sign Printing

    Am I the only one curious about the sign face itself? How will that be secured to the posts? What is it to be made out of?
     
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