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FENDER BENDER : Repairing repaired wraps

Discussion in 'Vehicle Wraps' started by GP, May 31, 2013.

  1. GP

    GP Very Active Member

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    We had a collision place call us wanting to install / patch a wrap we installed a couple years ago. The client had a fender bender and the front bumper, hood and quarter panel were replaced and need to wrapped. Foreseeable problem: the auto body place just painted these pieces. What do you do in this instance? We have had two recent wrap failures where, come to find out later, the bumpers were re-painted and not factory. The adhesion pulled the paint (once during installation, once during removal). I know we should wait on this - but I don't see client wanting to drive a half pink, half silver car for 6 weeks. Thanks and happy Friday.
     
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  2. Red Ball

    Red Ball Very Active Member

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    Perhaps the body shop has the ability to bake it? Not likely.
     
  3. TXFB.INS

    TXFB.INS Very Active Member

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    fresh paint = waiver signed that they know this is not the proper way and you are not held liable for any issues
     
  4. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

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    Wonder what would happen to the wrapped part if they did bake on the paint....
     
  5. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    I'd probably find out how well it was prepped and then tell them you will do it, but it needs at least 10 days to cure. Also, tell your client, there are no guarantees when wrapping a repainted vehicle or parts thereof. Quote it high enough, so if something goes wrong, you don't have to go back and ask for more money.

    Accidents happen, we all know it, but their problems should not impact on your abilities to do your job professionally.
     
  6. johnnysigns

    johnnysigns Very Active Member

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    The body shop should know the paint manufacturer recommendations on how long the paint should outgas before a decal application. You can request them to double bake it also. I would adhere strictly to what the paint mfg recommends whether your client is pissed or not. You'll be to blame when you yank a chunk of paint off if you rewrap it prematurely.
     
  7. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Evidently, you've never worked around Maaco or other hack body shops.......... :Big Laugh
     
  8. MrSalumi

    MrSalumi Member

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    Well then wait.. Tell the customer that this is the way to do it properly and that if they don't want it done properly they can find another place to do it. You avoid yourself problems with the failing wrap and keep up your quality image. No matter what anyone says if you have them sign a waiver and the wrap fails they are going to dislike you and your company more than if you tell them to wait 6 weeks for a product you can guarantee.

    my 2 cents.
     
  9. the graphics co

    the graphics co Active Member

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    We do a lot of body shop repair work. The problem is, you cannot guarantee anything beyond a personal guarantee. The vinyl manufacturers don't warranty their products on repainted areas. Not because it is guaranteed to damage the paint in the long term, but there are a lot of variables and it is easier to not warranty any of the work.

    There are likely a few reasons for this:

    1. You cannot guarantee the integrity of the repair work for any shop unless you are able to witness and document the repair was handled properly the whole way through the process.

    2. Varying paint manufacturers, not all paint is created equal, not all bondo, prep materials, primer or technicians are created equally either.

    3. Curing time varies between 30-45 days for major manufacturer paint, akzo, sikkens, sw etc... Clients don't want their vehicles without branding on a quarter panel for 45 days. Especially if you can't guarantee the work anyway.


    Flash Curing:
    Something to keep in mind as well, body shops usually have IR (infra-red) lights, sometimes they are called heat lamps, these IR lights have the ability to flash cure fresh paint. It takes 1 hour under an IR light for a section of paint to be cured, that is information directly from the paint manufacturer. That IR light has to be moved section to section until you are able to get every area of fresh paint cured. A complete paint job may take 8+ hours to cure as the lights are only about 3' x 3' and it requires moving it after every hour, but, the paint is cured and you will not face any further out gassing after that. After that is complete you can wrap immediately after it leaves the body shop.

    pm me if you want further details on that.
     
  10. the graphics co

    the graphics co Active Member

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    The issue isn't usually the wrap failing or falling off, it is the wrap takes the paint off upon removal.
     
  11. GP

    GP Very Active Member

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    Thank you everyone. All great information.
     
  12. GP

    GP Very Active Member

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    Owner of shop said it is a PPG "force dry" product - which is put under lights for an accelerated cure time. He recommended waiting at least 5 days for chemical out-gassing.
     
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