Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Glueing Dibond

Discussion in 'Materials' started by DizzyMarkus, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. DizzyMarkus

    DizzyMarkus Active Member

    822
    0
    0
    Jan 23, 2012
    After cutting the vgroove in the backside of my Dibond and folded -- Is there a glue that you use to adhere it ? Do you make small 45's for the inside corners? -- thanks for any finishing ideas

    Markus
     
    Tags:
  2. DizzyMarkus

    DizzyMarkus Active Member

    822
    0
    0
    Jan 23, 2012
    Maybe it was to simple of a question?> lol

    Markus
     
  3. CanuckSigns

    CanuckSigns Very Active Member

    3,391
    391
    83
    Nov 11, 2008
    Ontario
    I attempted it once, never did find a glue strong enough to hold the v-groove closed, we ended up making a frame and using PL-9000 construction adhesive to adhere the dibond to the frame.

    However, You can weld the plastic together with a hot air welder, but I have no experience with this.
     
  4. CES020

    CES020 Very Active Member

    2,875
    4
    38
    Oct 16, 2008
    VA
    Call Chemical Concepts in PA. They have products that will do it. You might have to glue something to it, like a metal angle bracket to the inside, rather than just gluing it to itself, but I've seen aluminum joined to aluminum just like you're talking about, and it was one heck of a bond. Enough so that places like SignComp had demos of their extrusions glued together with it.

    I don't know the product name, but I do know it was Chemical Concepts.

    Tell them what you're trying to do and they'll have the right solution.
     
  5. nwsigns

    nwsigns Member

    152
    0
    16
    Jan 13, 2011
    Monroe wa
    Best to use angle aluminum to hold it together - along with Lords 406-19 or similar epoxy, stuff will not fail if used properly.
     
  6. John L

    John L Very Active Member

    1,468
    0
    36
    Apr 28, 2007
  7. J Hill Designs

    J Hill Designs Major Contributor

    15,549
    16
    0
    Sep 24, 2004
    this.
     
  8. skyhigh

    skyhigh Major Contributor

    4,866
    10
    38
    Jun 16, 2005
    PA
    Agree on the epoxy (406-19).....but I have to wonder if we could offer better advice if we knew what exactly you were doing.
    First off, I personally (stress personally), would never bend dibond for a long term project. I'm racking my mind for any situation where bending dibond would be a preferred method. I'm coming up empty.
     
  9. J Hill Designs

    J Hill Designs Major Contributor

    15,549
    16
    0
    Sep 24, 2004
    to create a pan.

    heres a dibond fab manual
     

    Attached Files:

  10. skyhigh

    skyhigh Major Contributor

    4,866
    10
    38
    Jun 16, 2005
    PA
    .............. ya don't say.

    I know WHAT he's doing. I'm saying there may be (probably be) better materials and methods to accomplish the same finished product.

    In every scenario I can think of, if your going to be using 406.19, along with aluminum angle to make your pan.....along with the additional labor of routing a "V" groove into dibond type product (inferior after all you're left with is a .020 skin of aluminum), why not just use an .063 aluminum to start?

    Again, without additional info from Markus, I'm coming up blank.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  11. DizzyMarkus

    DizzyMarkus Active Member

    822
    0
    0
    Jan 23, 2012
    Sorry for being vague.
    Yes I was going to experiment with making pans of different shapes and didnt believe the "bend" alone was strong enough to hold the shape. I would figure angle aluminum in the corners and wondered what type of glue would be used (or the process) for keeping it in place once bent. The weight difference for .063 would be a factor no? Not that the weight is a factor just a difference. Also maybe glueing a piece or shape over another say 3d type effect.

    It would seem building a skeleton would be best per hanging and strength :0)


    thank you all for your responses

    Markus



    PS: thank you jhilldesigns for the fab link
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  12. FS-Keith

    FS-Keith Active Member

    721
    2
    18
    Dec 4, 2010
    pennsylvania

    have you looked at a wells fargo bank in the last two years? all those red pans with channel letters mounted on them are dibond. I agree with you though, for my customers i would always use alum and glue and flush cut to an alum angle subframe for a pan sign.
     
  13. DizzyMarkus

    DizzyMarkus Active Member

    822
    0
    0
    Jan 23, 2012
    ty Keith --
    hence the glue question :0) The other was full frame or corners but still the glue was the major question.

    Thank you,
    Markus
     
  14. skyhigh

    skyhigh Major Contributor

    4,866
    10
    38
    Jun 16, 2005
    PA
    The most common method for me would be to bend the aluminum to form a pan, rather than use angle. For someone that dosen't have a brake, then the dibond/router method, or the aluminum angle would be another way to get the job done.
     
  15. rjssigns

    rjssigns Major Contributor

    5,164
    521
    113
    Jun 4, 2007
    Home Office
    If I can get in contact with a friend I will ask what he uses to bond aluminum. He builds monocoque chassis for race cars with aluminum sheet with hexalite last time I talked to him. Whatever "bonding agent" he is using should be quite sufficient for signs, no?
     
  16. synergy_jim

    synergy_jim Very Active Member

    Call a local adhesives supplier. They will have epoxy panel adhesives that will work for your application.
     
  17. DizzyMarkus

    DizzyMarkus Active Member

    822
    0
    0
    Jan 23, 2012
    thank you all again for all the great ideas/info

    Markus
     
  18. johnnysigns

    johnnysigns Very Active Member

    1,195
    4
    38
    Nov 3, 2004
    East Coast
    I do this every day with plastics. Use gussets where possible and a confirmed working epoxy/adhesive and it'd be quite strong. In my limited dibond production experience I've used gorilla glue in a pinch for something similar, although I'm sure there's better alternatives.
     
  19. Keith Jenicek

    Keith Jenicek Member

    44
    0
    0
    Sep 6, 2010
    Instead of using a V-bit, use a flat bottom V-bit. (If that isn't what you are already doing.)
    If you are making a cabinet, you can do so using rivets. It requires a little planning on the cutout of your substrate though:
    The top break and the side break will be rivited together on one side. That is the top or side, whichever will be less noticable. The key is creating a triangular "notch" on one side and an equal triangular "extra" piece on the other. After the "extra" piece is bent, it should align with the "notch". Where these pieces meet, add a small piece of Dibond to the inside and rivet them together.
     
  20. superjay5

    superjay5 New Member

    10
    0
    0
    Nov 24, 2010
    Having made thousands of Dibond/Alupanel Pans, in every way it is superior then a Aluminum .063 pan.

    The quality, the bends, and the cost.


    Use Alupanel, its a lot cheaper, get the Ultra Matte even cheaper yet, only comes in 4' x 8'

    We CNC the Dibond/Alupanel first, the outer shape and all the v grooves and the 45 degrees at the corners so they come together perfect. We can route a 4' x 8' in under 10 minutes.

    Then will will mount graphics, usually it is full coverage, full digital print. We will use a laminator to then mount the graphics. We flush cut to the edge of the panel, but in the corners we will wrap the graphics. When the pans get "glued" up, the corners will look perfect.

    We then break the pan using really just our hands, then use the Lord 406/19 to glue in little angle aluminum Corner Keys.

    The longest step in this process is letting the Lord Dry.

    So why is this better then using .063 aluminum?

    Dibond/Alupanel will NOT oil can, .063 aluminum will

    How do you do the corners clean on .063? its a chore to make them look tight. I don't want to see any type of fasteners on our pans.

    How do you break the aluminum? Before Graphics are applied? If so now you need to manually "wrap" the return.... labor intensive!

    Break after graphics are applied? now you have to protect your graphics as you break your aluminum, don't want to damage those graphics!

    The edge of the breaks will be cleaner looking on the Alupanel vs. the .063.

    A quick look at list cost of materials: Ultra Matte Alupanel = $49.13
    .063 prefinished White Aluminum = $73.26

    The biggest factor is labor!!!! always is.

    Trust me..... I have made a lot of RED pans :p
     
  21. smdgrfx

    smdgrfx Member

    353
    0
    16
    Mar 9, 2006
    Houston, TX
    I've been making the pans using aluminum angle corners and one brace in the middle from top to bottom. We rivet everything together and then apply graphics. Never thought about using an epoxy glue. I will look into that.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

 


Loading...