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high quality papers for desktop inkjet?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Pauly, Dec 9, 2018.

  1. Pauly

    Pauly Colour Guru

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    Feb 14, 2016
    Melbourne
    Is there paper other than photopaper that i can use to get high colour prints from my Epson p600?
    Or am i stuck with using photopaper?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. SignMeUpGraphics

    SignMeUpGraphics Moderator

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    Apr 11, 2012
    Australia
    Talk to Tyson from TotalImageSupplies down your way.
    They have a huge range of papers for aqueous machines.
     
  3. kcollinsdesign

    kcollinsdesign Active Member

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    There is, of course, a whole variety of paper you can use. Epson makes 100% rag content hot and cold pressed papers, along with its photo and archive quality papers. Hahnemühle Photo Rag is another quality choice; they also have glossier options.

    Are you looking for a quality presentation paper? This is an aesthetic decision, and is informed as much by the emotional content of the image as the technical considerations.

    Are you are looking for a proofing paper? Most importantly, you have to decide if you are producing a high resolution proof, a plotter proof, or a G7 print to "standard densities". You must choose a paper that has similar brightness and finish as the output media.

    For absolute accuracy, you must produce a press proof (or printer proof) at the same resolution and the on the same media as the finished product. This can be a "slice" of a section for critical color matching. The overall design can be soft-proofed on a monitor or printed on copy paper.

    Copy paper is a good economical choice for non-critical projects. The higher the brightness level, the better.
     
  4. Pauly

    Pauly Colour Guru

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    Feb 14, 2016
    Melbourne
    Thanks i had a look on their site, i'll give him a ring.

    Presentation paper i suppose. I dont use it for proofing, mostly a3/a4 photos but i'd like to print of images to present to clients (not as a proof)
     
  5. kcollinsdesign

    kcollinsdesign Active Member

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    Apr 22, 2007
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    Presentation paper i suppose. I dont use it for proofing, mostly a3/a4 photos but i'd like to print of images to present to clients (not as a proof)[/QUOTE]

    Then you have to decide whether it is just for the client to look at, or whether you need an archival quality print that will be framed and displayed. If it is just for the client to look at, a matte 150 - 200 gsm presentation paper would be nice. Anything cheaper will work, but will be under-kill for the quality of the Ultrachrome inks used by that printer.

    If you are trying to "wow" the client, there is a whole range of fine art papers available, in a range of surfaces, tones, and textures.

    If you are proofing (which this printer is great at, when set up correctly with a quality RIP), you will want a dedicated proofing paper.

    I had a 890 series printer (similar to what you have), and kept several rolls in stock for different purposes. I also kept some sheet stock around for photo printing.

    Most of the time, I ended up printing on an Epson Workforce using 20 lb. copy paper. I found sign work more lucrative than fine art printing, and sold the 890 to a guy that sold fine art prints and frames from a storefront.
     
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