Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How to design perfect template/outline/vector

Discussion in 'Designs & Layouts' started by iwrap, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. iwrap

    iwrap New Member

    5
    0
    0
    Nov 25, 2012
    Hi guys! Name is Tom and i need your help. I've been trying to find a way to make/create template from any stuff to make printed graphic. Let say i want to make a template for a Rzr side by side or a laptop or smartphone. How do you guys do it ? Do you take a picture and recreate it in illustrator/photoshop ? Do you stick some special paper on the "thing" and use a pencil to sketch on it and scan it after ? I really have a hard time to find a way to make near perfect template. Can you guys give me some tip and trick ?

    (sorry for my english by the way i'm french from Quebec/Canada)

    Thanks a lot

    Tom
     
    Tags:
  2. TammieH

    TammieH Very Active Member

    1,087
    67
    48
    Nov 28, 2011
    Pacific NW
    Yes
     
  3. TammieH

    TammieH Very Active Member

    1,087
    67
    48
    Nov 28, 2011
    Pacific NW
    LOL Sorry :)

    If you are making your own templates, yes, I would start with a photo, but when I redraw, I would take precise measurements of all the details.
     
  4. DrCAS

    DrCAS Member

    Template

    When I was making art for my cell phone case, I put it on the scanner and made a vector template off of that. It is better to me because it is straight on and flat. More so than a photo would be.
     
  5. James Burke

    James Burke Being a grandpa is more fun than working

    3,431
    461
    83
    Jan 2, 2010
    Mitten State
    I use AutoCAD for those kinds of projects. It can be done with other software, but a basic CAD program will give you precision you're looking for. With a good engineer's scale and dial or digital calipers, you can reverse engineer just about anything. You can also trace scans or photos easily.

    TurboCAD is available for a little bit of nothing.


    JB
     
  6. Kaiser

    Kaiser Member

    145
    0
    16
    Oct 25, 2012
    Portugal
    Agree....
    Besides there are also blocks and meshes(depending on your software) readily available for free on most 3d packages. The advantage is that most flat plane cad outlines can be imported into corel too as a DXF. Dont know about illustrator though. never tried it.
     
  7. rjssigns

    rjssigns Major Contributor

    5,164
    521
    113
    Jun 4, 2007
    Home Office
    I take photos and measure a few key points. Bring photo into Illustrator and scale those key points. It only takes a few minutes to do a pen trace and end up with a vector template.
     
  8. James Burke

    James Burke Being a grandpa is more fun than working

    3,431
    461
    83
    Jan 2, 2010
    Mitten State
    Illustrator, SignLab and Omega all handle .DXF files extremely well, hence the reason we use AutoCAD. We do most of our design work in Illy, AutoCAD and Omega and then bring them in to SignLab as .DXF files to cut. Very rarely do we have any line / vector issues.

    I've noticed Illustrator CS6 seems to do a better job of exporting .DXF files than previous versions. We used to have issues with "double cutting" (SignLab used to cut them as thick lines), but not with CS6.


    JB
     
  9. Kaiser

    Kaiser Member

    145
    0
    16
    Oct 25, 2012
    Portugal
    Voila. C'est tout.

    There you have it
     
  10. Supergirl

    Supergirl Member

    143
    0
    16
    Apr 8, 2013
    Chicago
    +1

    i take a photo with the tape measure next to the object. then scale based on the "real" measure and draw in illustrator.

    Generally, i have a few steps before, since i take templates off uneven surfaces (motorcycle fairings)
    I use clear transfertape and mark the shape with a sharpie. Then lay it flat and take a picture with said tape measure.

    Works with aluminum foil pretty good too.

    That's the best i could come up with. WOuld be curious to hear if someone has better ideas.
     
  11. Jester1167

    Jester1167 Premium Subscriber

    Depending on the accuracy you may have to scan or photograph it, import, trace, produce, install, then tweak it several times. It all depends on the accuracy your looking for and your experience. One thing that will help your accuracy is to make sure your taking the picture straight on and keep what you are photographing in the center third of the image. You get a lot less image distortion.

    Lens_Distortion.jpg
     
  12. TyrantDesigner

    TyrantDesigner Art! Hot and fresh.

    1,667
    0
    36
    Mar 9, 2011
    Amarillo, TX
    I would normally photograph or scan the surface, but just like any sort of special template ... accurate measurements and drafting skills will help no matter the program. So whether it's a cell phone, an atv shell or a custom camera case ... the best programs won't help if your measurements are wonky. One thing I teach people I work with is how to make their own templates and how to measure them out ... which is particularly helpful if you even encounter that one odd vehicle that has lots of aftermarket parts and custom body elements. I can't even count how many times I've had to basically design around a weird complex curve in a form ... if I had designed it from a photo I wouldn't have seen it. CAD programs are the best for architectural designs and technical schematics ... for templates of those elements ... second to none. I even think there are a couple decent free cad programs out there that should be able to get you to where you need to be without making a monitary investment in case you don't like the feel of those programs.
     
  13. iwrap

    iwrap New Member

    5
    0
    0
    Nov 25, 2012
    Wow thanks a lot guys! Do you any website/tutorial i can have a look at to learn more about that stuff ? I'm mostly i self learner since i don't have anybody to show that stuff to me. Most shop/people in my country want to keep those secret for themself so they don't get a new kid to steal there business :(
     
  14. jmag215

    jmag215 Member

    105
    0
    16
    Nov 2, 2011
    utah
    here is a video somewhat similar to how i do all my sleds, bikes, side by sides etc. after you draw it lay it flat on a wall, with a tape measure taped to the wall above it and then take a picture. take it to illustrator and make the picture to scale (so the picture of the tape is 1"=1") then trace around it with the pen tool. cut it out, put it on the bike and figure out what you want to change to make it fit better. usually takes me 3-5 times every piece to get it close but i am really anal about tight lines. hope that helps.

    [video=youtube;KW1mO0iBja4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KW1mO0iBja4[/video]
     
Loading...

Share This Page

 


Loading...