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I need a great picture of a wine cellar

Discussion in 'Designs & Layouts' started by No Name, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. No Name

    No Name Member

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    Customer wants a picture of a wine cellar to cover a wall (4 x 5meters). I haven´t found a good enough picture yet so can you point me to a good direction to find one?
     
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  2. visual800

    visual800 Very Active Member

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    type wine cellar in search engine
    click on images and then search for largest file

    there you go...OR go to photostock. I use them alot and images are very reasonable
     
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  3. Emd2kick

    Emd2kick Member

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    Shutterstock, iStock, Getty.....is this really a question?
     
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  4. No Name

    No Name Member

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    ...
     
  5. ExecuPrintGS

    ExecuPrintGS Member

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    pixabay.com
     
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  6. Emd2kick

    Emd2kick Member

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    Yes I do
     
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  7. DerbyCitySignGuy

    DerbyCitySignGuy Active Member

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    How is this helpful at all?

    visual800 is right. Seems like there are some pretty decent unlicensed wine cellar pictures you can grab with a Google image search to present to your customer (just make sure you save a copy of the image first, in case it disappears).
     
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  8. ewded

    ewded Member

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    Images found on the net (or even 5000px x 5000px 300dpi stock photo) will give you like 1dpi? over 4x5 meter
     
  9. unclebun

    unclebun Member

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    Even the newest Nikon Z 6 has an image sensor of only 6048x4024 pixels. Pictures just don't come any bigger than that. But have you seen a problem with pixelation on a full-image billboard that's 16'x32'? Or bigger? No, because on bigger images you have to get a greater distance to see the picture.

    The picture I linked of a library-like wine cellar with a table and chairs in the middle is 2500x1667 and when I make it 12'x16', it comes out 12 dpi when I look in Corel Draw. That's actually quite acceptable, and if you found a picture that was 5000 pixels or 6000 pixels in width it would be even higher.
     
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  10. unclebun

    unclebun Member

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    Just trying to show that there are pictures out there. And the last two links are to stock photo sites, from which most of the others likely originated.
     
  11. A 5000px x 5000px image will yield around 31 pixels per inch when sized at 4 meters. It will look pixelated at any viewing distance under 15' or so. You could interpolate additional pixels into the image, but the results will be blurry. Depending on the viewing distance and the clients expectations, it could be made to work.

    Check Getty Images.
     

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  12. DerbyCitySignGuy

    DerbyCitySignGuy Active Member

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    If the viewing distance is less than 15 feet (what kind of wall are we talking about), anything lower than 75 DPI is going to look "not great".

    [Edit: That would require an image that was over 10k x 15kish.]
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
  13. JBurton

    JBurton Signtologist

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    So I was going to be sarcastic about how there are almost no actual photos that will print without being blurry at such a size, then the internet proved me wrong...
    http://www.in2white.com/
    "The 365-gigapixel photo would be as large as a soccer field if printed out at 300dpi"
     
  14. Pauly

    Pauly Colour Guru

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    This is shocking.

    I feel like the lot of you don't know how to enlarge an image properly. You're suppose to resample the image, maybe bit of noise reduction ect.

    If you enlarge an image to the nearest pixel, it will look bad, pixelated ect. which is how RIPs do it and when you go into photoshop and stretch to canvas.

    I have many prints 3-6m wide, viewing distance is 0.5m and you cannot see any form of pixelation.

    It does help getting a good image though, using images shot on 45-50mp full frame cameras are ok, images from a medium format camera are much better.
    but there's ways around blowing up small images, i still have a lot of success with images from stock websites if that's what my client wants.
     
  15. That photo took 15 days to shoot (70000 shots stored on 40 terabytes) and 2 months post-production. None of my clients have anything even remotely close to that kind of budget.
     
  16. Please don't be so condescending! Most of us know how to use resampling, sharpening, and noise reduction to mediate the issues that come with enlarging images for large scale output (I will often use the Camera Raw plug-in in Photoshop). You will end up with a higher pixel count image that will not look pixellated, but it will still be blurry. You cannot add detail that is not there. It comes down to what is acceptable.
     
  17. No Name

    No Name Member

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    Thank for (some of) your output on the matter.
    To answer some thoughts...
    Wall is in a restaurant cabinet that will be looked at very near, so any pixelation is a no no.
    It will be printed on a wallpaper (paper) material.
    I do know how to manipulate a bad picture so that it looks "allrightish" from a distance, but that is a no no on this case.

    Anyway, still searching...
     
  18. jfiscus

    jfiscus Adobe Shinobi

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    You should be fine with a final print resolution around 75 dpi and not have "pixelation" issues if you can find a large image.
    300 DPI isn't needed or even possible; that's just for fine text on things people are going to be reading up close.
    Photoshop's "Preserve Details 2.0" re-sampling filter works wonders on enlarging already good large (but not large enough) images.
    I have Perfect Resize / Genuine Fractals and don't use it much anymore with how well you can get PS to work wonders.
    I usually upscale images 125-150% at a time multiple times until I reach the target dimensions.
     
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