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Joe Diaz. I have a question....

Discussion in 'Corel' started by Kottwitz-Graphics, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. Kottwitz-Graphics

    Kottwitz-Graphics Very Active Member

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    Joe, actually a couple of questions. I'm watching your webinar, and I'm curious as to when you sit down to create something, do you have a clear idea as to exactly what your going to create, or do you start with a general idea, and just let it transform into what looks good at the time? Your drawing the red rocket, and i can see where your going, and I've picked up a couple of tricks so far.

    Also, on your use of the contour tool, is that all you use? Have you ever used an add on program, such as Signtools 4, to aid in design to create outlines, inlines, etc. The reason I ask is I use ST 4 and sometimes even export out to CasMate to create a certain type of shadow.

    Thanks in advance,
    Mark
     
    Tags:
  2. neato

    neato Very Active Member

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    I'm not Joe, but I'll chime in as someone who receives a lot of art created by others.

    Working with contours is a GREAT habit to get into. Outlines are pretty useless in this industry in my opinion. Most of the time, when a designer creates with outlines, they forget to make the outlines scaleable. So when we go to increase the size, we lose all kinds of detail. It's tedious and frustrating to work with art like that.

    Contours on the other hand eliminate that problem. The outline becomes it's own layer which makes scaling and adjusting a breeze.

    So this is my plead to all you sign designers out there: STOP USING OUTLINES! :D
     
  3. signage

    signage Major Contributor

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    :goodpost::thumb:
     
  4. Joe Diaz

    Joe Diaz Very Active Member

    It depends on the project, sometimes I can picture what I want to create better than other times. I have found that the longer I have been doing this, the easier it comes to me, yet I'll still have those bad days where nothing seems to fall into place. Either way, almost everything is guided by a few rules/guidelines I set for myself. Using contrast and colors in the correct way for example or having a good handle of negative space.

    I don't always use the contour tool to create contours/borders, but I use it most of the time. I think it all goes back to the layered vinyl graphic days. To have that solid contour layer that the lettering sits on top of is easier to work with. Phillip brought up other great reasons to use the contour tool.

    Anymore, it's a time saving thing for me. I can create the desired effect in a few short steps, versus creating an outline (or "stroke" for illy users), converting it to curves, breaking it a-part, welding it back together, sending it back a layer... etc.

    When I do these tutorials or webinars, I tend to slow it down a bit too, so it's easier for people who are newer to Corel to understand. Otherwise I use a lot more short cuts and work at my own pace. Using other software and exporting and importing just slows down the process for me. CorelDRAW can handle most of what I ask for in a design program so I tend to do most of my work within CorelDRAW.
     
  5. Mir

    Mir New Member

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    question

    I joe i have the service manual, but i can't enter to the service menu say protected do you know the password
     
  6. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    In embroidery we have the same type of tool called (at least for Wilcom users) "Insert Offset Object". Slightly different cons as they are embroidery specific, but same type of pros though.

    I see both the Contour Docker as well as the Insert Offset Object for embroidery a lot, especially this time of year with free standing embroidery ornaments. A lot better then just dealing with outlines.
     
  7. brian_fellers

    brian_fellers Member

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    neato: what design program do you use?
     
  8. Kottwitz-Graphics

    Kottwitz-Graphics Very Active Member

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    Are we talking about the same thing? I know pen stroke ( or line weight ) doesn't scale, but I'm talking about a true vector outline, that I can choose to be a set distance from the original object.

    When i create art, I tend to draw in real world scale, and if I want an outline 1/4" outside the original, I can just select outline, then under distance, I enter .25.
     
  9. neato

    neato Very Active Member

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    Bdyer32:

    Corel user here :)
     
  10. Joe Diaz

    Joe Diaz Very Active Member

    It sounds like you are talking about a contour not an outline. In Corel the width of the Outline is not "true vector" until you "convert outline to object". In other words I can't send a 2 inch wide outline to my plotter and cut both edges of that outline unless I first convert it to curves.

    The nice thing about the contour tool over using an outline to do the same thing is it starts out being a vector shape, and you don't have to worry about how it exports, selecting options like "scale with object" or "behind fill". You can give it gradient fills.. etc...

    However there are some instances where I would rather start with an outline instead of a contour. For example if I want to use the "outline styles" like a dashed line or giving it a calligraphy nib shape. But ultimately I always end up converting that outline to a vector object.

    For example, when I create cartoons, I use the outlines with a calligraphy nib to give it a thick and thin stroke, making the cartoon a little more cartoon like.

    I think my next webinar is going to be converting a scanned hand draw cartoon into vector art.
     
  11. knucklehead

    knucklehead Active Member

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    When's the next webinar?
     
  12. Joe Diaz

    Joe Diaz Very Active Member

  13. Billct2

    Billct2 Major Contributor

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    Yes, it's confusing because different programs us different terms. I still like to use Gerber Omega and an outline is a true outline (not a stroke) and same for shadows.
     

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