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Muscle Car Digitized

Discussion in 'Embroidery' started by Suz, Nov 29, 2014.

  1. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    This is a TransAm, digitized from a photo a Customer took of his own car. This was sewn onto a black jacket back,
    It also had the name of an Upholstery shop in an Arc above the Car, and a second line (straight) under the car.
    Customer was pretty happy. It was fun. Thought I would share since I haven't posted any of my work in a while.
    Thanks for looking!
     

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  2. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    Nice job. Nice to see someone changing up the stitch angles with fill stitching to give it some dimensionality. It's the little things like that that help breath life into a design.

    What was the overall stitch count?
     
  3. SqueeGee

    SqueeGee Active Member

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    Nice!
     
  4. Craig Sjoquist

    Craig Sjoquist Major Contributor

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    I don't really understand embroidery, it seems alot more then just take digital picture & sew away since the above post mention fill stitches for a better detailed look & I must admit that does look great indeed, so those extra steps really do pay of ..good going
     
  5. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    It's just changing up the angle of the fill stitches (direction that they are stitched in) that adds extra dimensionality without having to do other things like blending (which also depending heavily on stitch angles) etc, to achieve that same effect.

    A lot of your current embroiderers that use auto conversion (computer converts from vector (or even raster) image directly to embroidery) heavily, don't understand the importance of stitch angles and because the computer is making the decision, you either end up with similar angles among fill objects or angles that make no logical sense given the design.

    There is a lot more then goes into digitizing for embroidery then a lot of people realize, a lot more then I've mentioned here, that all seem like small things, but it makes the difference between a well running pattern that is great on production time versus the cheapie $5 pattern that costs you more production time because it takes 3 times as long to stitch out. And those that know what good embroidery should look like, that $5 pattern looks awful as well, but even some embroiderers would think that it does look good (or at least say that it does to safe face).
     
  6. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Overall Stitch Count

    [​IMG]
    For Craig S.
    - Here is the photo I was working from - digital photo from Customer. It was fairly low resolution which didn't matter, since I don't auto-digitize.
    Sometimes it is good to see what an Artist starts with and what you end up with.

     

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    Last edited: Nov 30, 2014
  7. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    That's not really bad at all considering the size. How fast where you able to run it?

    Medium weight? Not bad at all really, even if it was heavy weight. But I tend to be a stabilizer nazi and go whole hog, but I typically use the tear away so it's easier to just pull the excess a way.

    Push/pull are definitely the enemies of full back designs like this one.

    Another thing that you have to be worried about (this is just in general, I didn't see anything like this in your design, so don't think that) is worrying about long stitches (end point, and stitch angle are crucial for this) and this is actually the biggest flaw that you will see in auto converted (I can't say auto digitize, I just have a mental block on that).

    I try, Alicia just says I try to verbally beat people into submission. You remember that one design that I did "You Don't Need to be Stubborn....To be Right (But it Helps)? She has a lot of fun telling people her version of the inspiration that I had for that one.

    Lettering is so important in embroidery. It really should be the first thing people learn to digitize (and digitize correctly, by that I mean manually (or semi manually)). I can only imagine how it came out.


    I find that part of the job enjoyable, but I don't typically enjoy the carpel tunnel that goes along with the digitizing.

    I'm looking forward to that one. I really do like the old Model As.
     
  8. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Okay then, I'd better get on it!
     
  9. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Model A Ford

    Model A Ford was just over 45,000 stitches for the truck alone. This design when done on the jacket had an additional 13,000 in lettering, which was positioned above and below the car.
    The lettering was white, satin stitch

    .[​IMG]
    I chose not to include the hood ornament. I don't think it was easy to make out, looked like a dog bone to me. Customer didn't complain!
    :)
     

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    Last edited: Dec 1, 2014
  10. phototec

    phototec Very Active Member

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    Nice work!

    I'm not into embroidery, however I do have a Singer Futura CE100 which has a limited embroidery function.
     

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  11. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Thanks Phototec!
    That little Singer machine you have looks like it can accomplish a lot of tasks. When I got into embroidery, I started with some similar machines and got (3) of them. I think we had Brother Software at the time. The home digitizing software was not so good then, but I am sure it has come a long way since my start in machine embroidery. This will probably make you laugh, but I used to embroider by hand with a needle and skeins of wool. I would spiff up my brother's jeans (a hippie then) and some of my own stuff. That was back in the 70's. Didn't have lease payments, nothi'n like that! Just a needle and some wool. It was called "crewel" embroidery. Those were the days!
     
  12. DKgrafix

    DKgrafix Very Active Member

    Nice.
    Thanks for sharing
     
  13. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    I just love those old vehicles. Great job!

    I still keep a copy of PE Designs for my PR clients. Mainly just to enter it stop functions (or any other specialty functions) into the pattern as the PR series won't read the ones generated by Wilcom correctly and I have to save them as a PES format.

    Brother software isn't bad for it's price point, but it's "clunkly", not sophisticated in it's tool sets or interface (but for those used to MS office programs, it's an easy transition. I prefer Wilcom's GUI. The main thing that I don't like, the main old timers (computer old timers anyway) digitizing tool is the input A tool (name for it in Wilcom anyway), most digitizing programs in the $1k on up range will have it, is one tool in Wilcom, but is two tools in PE Designs. Just that type of thing.

    The main problem with home digitizing software (even thought the commercial brands have jumped on this bandwagon as well) is they tend to be heavily involved in auto conversion without the post cleanup toolset. And that's what you'll see a lot of on Etsy selling their digitized patterns.


    That's how I learned to. Still have the hoops and I occasionally still do hand embroidery, but either touch up here or there or as an embellishment for a gift. I don't have Hand and Lock's clientele or history, so I can't do that for pay anymore.
     
  14. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Dennis, Thank you!

    Evan, Oh yeah, it was PE Design from Brother. I was glad to sell that program to someone else who needed it more than I did, after I sold the home embroidery machines. It did have a purpose and it was a good affordable way to learn. So glad to have moved on though. You are smart to keep something to open those designs for Customers. I do have a couple of ways to open the odd ones. Mostly I work in the Tajima format, save my sew files in .dst, which I find pretty universal.

    No Way! You too? Guess I'm not so ancient, yay!
    Oh, and about your "Etsy" comment, the only purchase I ever made on Etsty (thought I was smart) was about a $3.00 digitized fancy font alphabet, which had entire set of 1", 2" and 3" tall lettering. Never again! Could not use it, wasted my money. Seller warned bidders/buyers that it was not refundable. Didn't mention not at all use-able either! Not saying all things Etsy are bad. I don't know, that was my only try. Probably just bad luck on my part, but a coinkydink you mentioned what you could get for digitizing on Etsy. Yikes! In this case, gotta agree with you. Nothin fer cheap is somethin fer free. Or do I have it back-asx-werds? :) Better keep on digitizing, right? Etsy won't save me.

    Okay, today and the entire week is going to be a good one! Got my Computers all functioning like they should and I can work. Yay!
    Happy extended Black Friday everyone! How long will last Friday last?? Go snag a deal or two. :)
     
  15. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    Whenever I do freelance work, DSTs are usually what I send by default. For your commercial machines, as you've said, they are the most universal. I still do quite a bit of work for single needle users and those that have the low to mid range require their own native format. Sometimes, it's proprietary that you have to have that software to do it, in that case, I'll send a DST and they will convert themselves. Most mid to high end single needles and your commercial machines will accept DSTs though.

    Occasionally I will get the customer that thinks that their machine will only take the native format, when in fact, it can read like 20 different formats. Typically that's your PR (Brother) users as that machine is considered high end consumer/entry level commercial. I'll typically send both formats, then they eventually go with the DST.

    I actually prefer to work in the Barudan U?? format when I do the embroidery work. I like having the ability to insert slow/fast commands to sped up or slow down the machine in certain spots of the design and not have to babysit the machine. To my knowledge that's the only machine that supports that functionality..

    Not at all. There are quite a few that look good. I have toyed with the notion of selling some of my stock designs on there, but that might open up a can of worms that I may not want to deal with.

    I have to say though, that quite a few do the auto conversion thing though, you can tell if with their simulated view. The long stitches that I mentioned before, sometimes they are evident when they shouldn't be (some shapes you have them, not way around it). And I also noticed a lot more small(er) designs that still have fill stitches only, giving it a flat look that it doesn't need to have.
     
  16. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Evan, thanks again for the conversation (phone) a couple weekends ago. I was about to pull my hair out with all the computer fixing going on around here!
    Still finishing up some stuff. Updating cad-cutting machines and software. Argh!!!

    Thanks for your input about the embroidery stuff too. You are so helpful!
     
  17. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    It was my pleasure. Glad that I could be of some help.
     
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