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Need help Printing Static cling on my JV3

Discussion in 'Mimaki' started by Cmind335, May 13, 2010.

  1. Cmind335

    Cmind335 Member

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    Apr 22, 2010
    I'm having problems with my prints on Static cling. They look blotchy and smeared. Almost like it's taking TOO long to dry and the ink runs together. I've tried different things to no avail. Is it heat? Amount of ink? Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. Rooster

    Rooster Very Active Member

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    Feb 22, 2008
    Edmonton
    Post a pic of what's happening and you're ten times more likely to get a response that helps.

    Not that Pat wasn't helpful with his reply.
     
  3. M@CK

    M@CK Member

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    Oct 30, 2007
    Montreal
    Personally, wen I print static cling, I put the heat at 60 and slow down the printing to 16 pass unidirectional. To prevent buckles from the heat I go on the take-up unit or just tape a loop at the edge of the media and put a heavy bar in it. just my 2 cents
     
  4. signswi

    signswi Very Active Member

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    Oct 29, 2009
    You can also just clamp ~3 table clips to the media to provide a bit of weight/keep tension.

    For static cling I actually drop the heat down quite low and slow down the passes/up the pass count. And yes, it takes ages to dry, though our environment is unavoidably low humidity so that isn't as big of a deal. We do quite a bit of photographic static clings and those are done 16-pass unidirectional, though still high speed. If you're getting ink puddling try more heat (or less heat! try both, experiment) and setting speed to slow, you also may consider making a specific profile for that media with an eye-one or at least a profile with ink restrictions for that media (based off your best white cast vinyl profile or whatever).
     
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