Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

need help with jv3 160sp

Discussion in 'Mimaki' started by t.baris, May 24, 2012.

  1. t.baris

    t.baris New Member

    3
    0
    0
    May 23, 2012
    i m using a mimaki jv3 160sp with flexi. When i use it with standart quality normal 2 dot size everything looks good but when i try to print high quality with varible-2 dot size everything looks blury like this. :banghead:

    Any one knows why? and How to fix it?
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: May 24, 2012
    Tags:
  2. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

    3,164
    16
    38
    Feb 18, 2010
    Houston TX
    i've had the same issue for months. i print almost exclusively in 360x360 1 pass 2x so i'm surviving with it. one thing. i first wanted to blame old heads. but recently i put a brand new black head and no change. also doing data swaps have not isolated it to any one head. i had a recommendation to look on the boards for any suspiciously bulging transistors but haven't had the chance because of so many other things, technical, going on at the studio. i really hope we get the smartest and brightest and some past fixes on this issue. having a printer with almost new heads all the way across hasn't fixed the issue.
     
  3. t.baris

    t.baris New Member

    3
    0
    0
    May 23, 2012
    thaks for replying

    i have an idea about that.
    but it can sound crazy
    can wind cause this? little breeze on the room can cause this little sand storm :D :help
     
  4. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

    3,164
    16
    38
    Feb 18, 2010
    Houston TX
    i did hear of this once being the fix for someone. they had their drier at such an angle that caused a breeze across the platen. no breeze on my side. no fan, no drier, nothing.
     
  5. ruckusman

    ruckusman Member

    125
    0
    0
    Feb 24, 2011
    Guys consider this, the main function of capacitors is to remove voltage fluctuations and electrical signal noise.

    The main electricity is AC at 50-60Hz, but all of the electronics and motors in the printers is DC. Capacitors play an intergal role in rectifying AC to DC.

    However, data signals are essentially AC, and capacitors play a significant role in ensuring signal integrity and supppressing transient DC volatage on signal lines.

    Well designed and built electronics has a margin for error / overhead with respect to the components as well as circuit board design to maximise signal integrity and performance.

    Your printers are built up to a standard, not down to a price.
    Capacitors have a service life, no matter what grade of components are used initially.

    If you are unable to print anyway, my suggestion would be to find a local TV repair man, one that actually repairs them and have them replace the capacitors on all of the boards.

    Or if you want to minimise the cost, trace the signal path(s) from the main board to the slider board and the heads and have those replaced. BTW get the slider board caps check/replaced also.

    They will likely have an ESR meter, which measures "electrical series resistance" in capacitors and may have be able to also measure the capacitance to check the actual values.

    Now this is an educated hypothetical supposition on my part, but if the large dot -> 360 DPI is printing clean though coarse, the larger signal (higher voltage, longer duration or both) has a better signal to noise ratio.

    peace out
     
  6. ChicagoGraphics

    ChicagoGraphics Major Contributor

    4,880
    81
    48
    Feb 27, 2007
    World
    Are you printing with your heads set at high or low? I was getting prints like yours just not as bad, I lowered the heads and a couple of other things like clean the encoder strip and sensor and it started to print perfect again and has been ever since.
     
  7. SightLine

    SightLine Very Active Member

    As ruckus mentioned it very well could be electrical. Capacitors defintiley do fail and while failed a device can still function. Just not as well as it should and depending on how the capacitor is used in the circuit, possibly not at all if one fails. Very often though they are used to stabilize downstream voltage.

    I'd inspect the boards closely. There will be 2 primary type of capacitors you will see easily. Regular lead mount electrolytic and surface mount eletrolytic. The larger standing ones are often easy to visually see when they are failing as the tops will often bulge up some. Surface mount ones, not going to visually see if those are failing and those type are a good bit trickier to replace yourself. These machines (JV3 and JV33) also use transistors to drive each of the head channels - I know if one totally fails that channel will simply not work at all but I'm not sure of the transistors can be flaky and starting to fail or if it's all or nothing for those. I did replace several of the transistors myself on our old JV3 - ordered them from Kent at MacMedia. Maybe if he pops in and sees this threa he might have some insight as well since he probably knows these machines electrically as much as anyone.
     
  8. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

    3,164
    16
    38
    Feb 18, 2010
    Houston TX
    thanks for the detailed discussion from both rucksman and sightline. i'm amazed at the amount of technical knowledge on this subject.

    @chigagographics this issue seems to be isolated to the dot size. high or low or very very low, i can still "cause" the overspray to happen by choosing certain dot sizes. by choosing non-variable, it does very well.

    this printer has such low miles on it. i bought it from a sign shop that never got off the ground. and i only use it about once or twice a month. maybe these capacitors just get old by "being old"? ...like drying out or shrinking/expanding?

    it's officially time to get into the guts of this printer. especially considering that i may be selling the printer in the next few months. i need it to be in tip top quasi-refurb condition.
     
  9. Jack Knight1979

    Jack Knight1979 Very Active Member

    1,091
    2
    38
    Jan 23, 2008
    Maine
    There was a sea bad caps built a couple years back. It has been a problem for thousands of devices.

    Check the tops of all the capacitors for a radius on the silver top of the units. Also side bulging is a sign of a bad cap. Easy enough to replace.

    A TV repair man is the way to go if you think you may have found some funky components.
     
Loading...

 


Loading...