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New to CNC Routing

Discussion in 'CNC Routing & Laser Cutting' started by Renato Pinto, May 3, 2019.

  1. Renato Pinto

    Renato Pinto Graphics Manager

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    We just got a "Industrial CNC Router." Thats the name of the brand i guess.

    Either way, it uses Mach3 and we use BobCam to create the G-Codes.

    We've done test cuts on different materials, mostly .080 aluminum and the finish product looks great with an 1/8 and 1/4 inch bit.

    We also wanted to try cutting some designs out of coroplast, ultraboard, PVC. It cuts the design as intended but it leaves a lot of residue hanging off the edges instead of them being clean-cut.

    We got a drag-knife to try out and it works pretty well for the most part. We need to do some work on the swiveling.

    Anyways, our Railcar Graphics Division is wanting to make number and letter stencils out of Oraboard. The height of the characters range from 2" to 4" so not very big.

    What kind of tool do we need to use for it to work on the Oraboard material?

    Also, any tips for a beginner on a CNC Router machine? Things you wish you would have known when you started routing substrates?

    Thanks for helping!
     
  2. MikePro

    MikePro Major Contributor

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    carbide upcut bits for metal. they're more expensive, but they last WAAYYYYYYY longer.
    if you don't have one already, get an oil mister system if you intend to route any metals regularly.

    uncertain what oraboard is, but for every material there's most likely a common problem that's solved with a specialty router bit.
    anyone worth their salt, that are looking to sell you router bits, will explain the differences/uses in detail. Substrate manufacturers will usually have recommendations as well.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. Gene@mpls

    Gene@mpls Very Active Member

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    I use a lot of .060 styrene for stencils- people seem to like it. And cut it on the laser- much quicker than the router.
     
  4. Renato Pinto

    Renato Pinto Graphics Manager

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    If you were using a router, what kind of bit would you use though?

    We just don't have access to a laser.
     
  5. Sandman

    Sandman Member

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    Several people on a CNC group I am in have said that misters on aluminum are not recommended because it will greatly shorten the life of your bit. An oil mister will cool the bit in random areas so uneven heating takes place. When it comes to cutting metal they agree that you should just use air blast. With proper speeds and feeds you should be fine. IN industrial machining you will see them flooding the cutter and part with fluid. People in my group do fine with nothing in many cases.
     
  6. IVRI

    IVRI New Member

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    Renato,

    Try getting hold of a hard copy router bit catalog, they list all their bits and the intended use, along with pricing of course. That is a very good way to start. We use Hartlauer Bits as our vendor, www.harlauerbits.com, very good customer service over the phone as well.
     
  7. JimmyG

    JimmyG Premium Subscriber

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    Register, GA
  8. MikePro

    MikePro Major Contributor

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    interesting, regarding misters shortening the life of your bit.... as my 1/4" Belin Spiral O upcut has been goin' strong now for about 6 dozen sheets of 1/8" aluminum. whenever the oil runs out, but the vortex air is still blowing, the chips still become molten and bind up on the bit until failure. and by mister, i do mean oil.
     
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