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OT: Any K-9 behavorial speclialists on here?

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by speedmedia, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. speedmedia

    speedmedia Very Active Member

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    Off topic but I am drawing at straws right now. My wife and I rescued a male boxer mix as a companion to our female boxer and picked him up Friday. Needless to say the entire day went great, they where getting along and playing well and even ate together.

    Anyways all was well until new dog snapped at current dog and took a big chunk out of her face... Off to the vet to get that fixed. Do I chalk this up as a one time thing or do I just take him back and maybe select another dog?

    I want another dog and this one is very sweet and well behaved I am just scared he is going to hurt the other one.

    Any advice?

    Thanks,
    Kurt
     
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  2. Rydaddy

    Rydaddy Member

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    I would say it is too early to write the dog off. Sometimes it is hard to tell which dog was "at fault" if that matters. I am NOT an expert, but can tell you that they won't get along perfectly overnight. Until you start to feel more comfortable about them and think they are getting along better... feed them while they are separated and don't give them the opportunity to "fight" over an object.
     
  3. Si Allen

    Si Allen Very Active Member

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    Easiest way to stop a dog from biting is to put a little piece of lead in one of his ears.

    Use a .22, .38, 9mm, .45ACP or a .44 mag ... all work quite well!


    :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
     
  4. bob

    bob Major Contributor

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    Rescue? Feh, you have no idea of what you're getting. Moreover there is some reason it needed rescuing. Not all rescues are tales of human neglect from the pages of Amelia Slopheart's journal, some are truly nasty specimens.

    If you want a good dog, find a reputable breeder of whatever breed you fancy. If you want to roll the dice on an unknown cur, go for the rescue.

    There's lots of really good dogs, why would you settle for anything less? It doesn't matter a clot of ossified bandicoot snot why a particular dog has problems, it's sufficient that it has them. There's enough dogs that don't have problems not to waste your time on one that does.
     
  5. SignosaurusRex

    SignosaurusRex Major Contributor

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    :goodpost:
     
  6. Sign_Boy

    Sign_Boy Major Contributor

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    Could use a little more info.
    How long have you had the female?
    How old is she?
    Is she fixed?
    How old is the male?
    Is he fixed?
    Did the male get along with other dogs at the rescue?
    Did you introduce the two dogs before you brought him home?

    Ok my take on it and I'm no expert.

    It's about dominance, one dog needs to be submissive and one needs to be dominate.
    If the female felt as if the male dog was taking charge she may have put off a so called bad vibe to the male.
    Causing the male to act out. After all it's her home can you blame her. (not saying this is the case)
    I wouldn't separate the two but I would closely monitor their interactions and intervene when necessary.
    If one acts more dominate than the other make that one become the submissive one.
    Help to teach it that he/she is not the boss you / your wife are.
    Don't hit or yell at the dogs this will not help the situation (not implying that you are)

    On another note don't act nervous around them they can pick up on this. Be the boss be calm about it take charge.
    In time (I hope) things will settle down.

    But what do I know I'm not an expert.

    And Bob I would have to disagree, a good amount of the time it's not the dog that has the problem it's the people that have the problem. (Not saying some dogs just aren't right in the head) Some people get dogs thinking it's going to be a cake walk - they have no idea what they are getting into. End result is a dog that has been neglected / mistreated or just not cared for as it should be.
    Example: Someone who gets a herding dog as a puppy maybe an Australian Shepherd because they think it's cute.
    Well they don't realize this dog needs a job to do / a workout. It's not the dogs fault the owner didn't do enough research to figure out their two bedroom apartment would have been a better fit for a Pekingese. Next thing you know the dog is dropped of at the shelter.
    Anyway I'm not trying to get into it with you I just feel there is nothing wrong with adopting the right dog into the right situation.
    You should know this you're a dog person right? Sorry for the rant - had a few beers tonight :thumb:

    Anyway best of luck in your situation.
    I hope the female heals quickly.
     
  7. Craig Sjoquist

    Craig Sjoquist Major Contributor

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    take dog back... easy way find a dog that they both get alone... but your now your dog has been bitten it will either be afraid of others or will not let it happen again

    the other dog wanted to prove who was alfa ... so might be a reason how are they getting alone now ???


    My dog was bitten young ... it attacks any dog that threatens in the least way medium to large male some female
     
  8. signcrafters london

    signcrafters london Very Active Member

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    I agree 100% with Sign Boy's post. You need to work with both dogs and let them know you are the pack leader and they are the pack. Do a google search for Cesar Millan. Pick up one of his books/DVDs and watch his weekly show, The Dog Whisperer, on The National Geographic Channel.

    Most importantly, until you are sure there will be no trouble, crate the dogs when you are not around, or put a muzzle on one or both dogs when you are not around to supervise.
     
  9. bob

    bob Major Contributor

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    The point being that it doesn't matter a whit why the beast is screwed up, the effort to unscrew is a waste of time when there are so many other unscrewed animals available.

    I deal in horses, not so much here in my golden years, but I still keep my hand in. There is much the same phenomenon with horses, people who have no business dealing with these animals attempting to do so. The results of their ignorance is, more often than not, a half ton or so of ill-trained creature who can and probably would kill you as soon as look at you. Not, like a dog, something you can drop-kick into the next time zone should circumstances require it.

    The market is flooded with these animals. If you want to take the time you can salvage the most of them but, as previously noted, why bother? Send it off to the killers where it belongs and go out and get a good animal. It's not the horse's fault but it's a death sentence regardless. Until such time as being abysmally ignorant once again carries the death penalty, it will be so.

    You can either waste your time doing the Vulcan mind meld, whispering [whatever silly thing that might mean], and thinking happy thoughts, or you can get a good animal without the behavioral baggage. Your choice.
     
  10. signcrafters london

    signcrafters london Very Active Member

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    Bob, it is just as likely that the OP's dog is responsible for the attack as the new dog.

    And the horse analogy is way off base. Dog owners do not treat their animals the same as horse owners. As a horse owner, would you bring a horse home, put it in a stable, throw in some hay, scratch it's back and pet its head a few times, and then expect it to know how to behave? Of course not. But 99% of dog owner's do expect that. They think all they have to do is bring rover home, give him food and water and he will magically know what to do.
     
  11. speedmedia

    speedmedia Very Active Member

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    Hey all, thanks for all of the input, good stuff here.

    Sign Boy, here are the answers to your questions:

    Could use a little more info.
    How long have you had the female? 3 1/2 years
    How old is she? 3 1/2 yrs
    Is she fixed? Yes
    How old is the male? 4 1/2 years
    Is he fixed? Yes
    Did the male get along with other dogs at the rescue? Yes, most. He isn't overly tolerant of over the top dogs ( ie chippy ankle biters and very hyper, my dog is neither)
    Did you introduce the two dogs before you brought him home? Yes, they spent about an hour together. I know if takes more time than that, the biggest thing they wanted to see was that my female was submissive towards him and she wasn't overly active or him overly aggressive.

    I to think it is unfair to base it off of one day. Since the accident my female has been at my parents resting with their dog. I have kept the male with us. He is super sweet and very affectionate. He knows all of the basic demands and he does what we tell him. He is a wonderful dog, but is he a wonderful dog for a home with another dog? That remains to be seen.

    I really want to give him the benefit of the doubt. If he was a nasty little pain in the butt he would have been back already. It is a very hard decision to make.

    I will tell you my female isn't afraid of him after the accident and she has been surrounded by other dogs since and she acts as though nothing happened.

    My biggest problem is I don't want this to happen again while I am at work and my wife can't get them apart or if he snaps at another dog or worse a little kid. I am on the fence, like I said along he is wonderful. If I didn't have the other dog he would be staying but she was first and she is the baby so if anything goes it is him.

    To give a few more details. This actual event occurred when we where out in the backyard. I was showing him around and he found a ball to play with. He was laying down chewing on it and my female walked by and he snapped. She didn't go after the ball nor did she thret but she might have given him that look someone else mentioned I don't know it all happened so fast.


    Thanks,
    Kurt
     
  12. Sign_Boy

    Sign_Boy Major Contributor

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    Sounds like guarding issues to me.
    When you feed him can you go near his food dish once he starts eating or does he growl? This is a good indicator.
    But like I said I'm no expert
     
  13. Sign_Boy

    Sign_Boy Major Contributor

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    Because as you said "The market is flooded with these animals" and they are living creatures.

    Have a look:

    http://www.petfinder.com/index.html

    The virtual home of 335,615 adoptable pets from 13,385 adoption groups
     
  14. Gordy Saunders

    Gordy Saunders Member

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    Get a puppy and let it grow into the situation. Your dog should remain the dominate dog in the house. Let you dog train it in how to behave.

    I got a dog from the rescue one time. Brought it home. It jump up on the couch and layed down. I went to get it off the couch and it growled at me. Straight back to the rescue, that was it. I wouldn't screw around with trying to teach a dog who is the boss. They have to grow up with you.
     
  15. speedmedia

    speedmedia Very Active Member

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    He is not guarded with his food or toys or anything towards a human and he doesn't seem to be food aggressive near other dogs either. I have taken his bowl away and he just sits down. He is pretty good in that aspect. I did the same thing all weekend with toys or bones or anything. You take it he just either sits down or lays down and seems like no big deal.

    He hopped up on the couch next to me and I pushed him down, same thing if he jumps up on other furniture or anything else. If I tell him no he leaves it.

    Thanks,
    Kurt
     
  16. Sign_Boy

    Sign_Boy Major Contributor

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    Sounds like a good dog to me:thumb:
    I guess only time will tell - it could have been a one time thing. I'd keep an eye on them and see what happens.

    Best of luck
     
  17. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Hey, you're all right. Nothing wrong with the new dog.... he just doesn't like your female.... yet. How many animals on this earth can just be dumped on and expected to like it's new playmate... especially if he thinks she's ugly or something. Heck, it happens with humans, rats, monkeys and dogs, too. There's always going to be a formulating time needed to adjust... and you just went about it wrong.

    When introducing two animals for the first time, you should always do it with close observation and make sure the kinda crap that just happened.... doesn't happen. YOU needed to be there for your original dog's protection and you failed her. Most animals that are part of the home feel like King or Queen of the land and this little drooling boxer wasn't invited. She probably displayed some anger and he bit her face in self-defense. Something, just about anyone will do when confronted.

    It's up to you if you wanna keep trying, but the rules have been set, no matter how bad you do or don't like them. You'll probably need to watch these two for a few weeks or maybe months and make sure they become friends.... or Boxer Boy will start nipping at kids or other things that get in his way. You have to knock that biting habit right out of his head, unless you wanna train him to become an 'Attack Dog'.

    Let them together only while being observed for short amounts of time, until she learns to share and he stops his biting.
     
  18. tcorn1965

    tcorn1965 Very Active Member

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    Just like a women... once a biter always a biter!!! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:




    Just kidding Ladies :notworthy::notworthy::notworthy:
     
  19. signcrafters london

    signcrafters london Very Active Member

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    One of the best things about dogs is they don't dwell on past incidents or worry about the future. They live in the present. Try your best not to feel nervous or apprehensive when you reintroduce the dogs to each other. They can sense it and it could trigger another episode.
     
  20. speedmedia

    speedmedia Very Active Member

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    Well thanks all for the input on this matter. We ended up taking him back. He did it again as I was standing between them. I am not sure who is at fault but I cannot work with this. I know there is some work involved but this one is just going to be to much work. We decided to try to find another puppy boxer or lab.

    It is a shame as he is a fantastic dog by himself just not with others I am sure it is a dominance thing but what do you do, I guess we tried to do the right thing.

    Thanks,
    Kurt
     

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