Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

outdoor wall wrap ?

Discussion in 'Vinyl' started by normana61, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. normana61

    normana61 Member

    36
    0
    6
    Apr 28, 2006
    Has anyone wrapped an outdoor stucco wall ?

    Fellers has a product with a 6 month life and was wondering if anyone has done one and how long has it been up.

    This one would be west facing in the northeast.

    thanks
     
    Tags:
  2. insignia

    insignia Very Active Member

    Yup. used both 3M's and MacTac's textured surface vinyls. Works well. We've had jobs up on both materials for over a year without any signs of failure. be sure when you quote this that you remember you need to purchase a fairly expensive installation kit (includes a heat gun and several rollers), you can't apply this with a torch and squeegee, it takes a LOT of heat and rollers that can resist it. Also remember that installation is a VERY VERY slow process, on the order of 4-5 times longer than installing regular vinyl. If you'd estimate the installation would take 2 hours if it were regular vinyl on a flat surface, quote 8 hours.
     
  3. Custom_Grafx

    Custom_Grafx Very Active Member

    1,637
    2
    0
    Nov 23, 2008
    You will see Insignia isn't exaggerating.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj5avQjyNyw

    A good video by the way. I have bought this material and used for low energy surfaces and it works well - but according to the vid, good for what you want too. Just remember if it's going into crevices and the such, use a cast lam.
     
  4. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

    5,991
    822
    113
    Dec 27, 2005
    Guam USA
    Interesting video.
    The installer in the clip said the adhesive migrates into the wall surface over time to become permanent - has anyone had the job of removing this film from a wall?
    Seems like an unholy mess would be left behind if the glue wicks into the wall over time.
    High pressure steam cleaner to get it off? Blow torch?

    wayne k
    guam usa
     
  5. insignia

    insignia Very Active Member

    Personally I wouldn't want to use one where the adhesive "migrates into the aggregate". With the 3M material, it really stays put because when you heat it up (really hot - 1000 deg.) and roll it into the texture, as it cools it hardens to that shape and that's really what holds it in place. We've removed a fair bit of the 3M and it comes off cleanly. MacTac uses a slightly more aggressive adhesive and probably falls somewhere between the Arlon and 3M materials. Having used Arlon DPF8000 for other things, though, there's no way I'd put it on a customer's brick or stucco wall because it's adhesive is so agressive. I've never installed or removed it on a wall though, so maybe it comes off cleanly and there's nothing to worry about, but I doubt it just from my experiences with it.
     
  6. smdgrfx

    smdgrfx Member

    353
    0
    16
    Mar 9, 2006
    Houston, TX
    I did a wall yesterday with the 3M vinyl on a "orange peel" finished dry wall. Goes on pretty easy. It's the 3rd time I've done a wall with it and I was very happy with the results. They were all indoor applications, so I'm assuming the stuff is on there for as long as no one decides to take off.

    I have wanted to try the Arlon, but wanted someone else's opinion before I buy a roll of the stuff. I want to try the Arlon on some low energy plastic stuff.
     
  7. Custom_Grafx

    Custom_Grafx Very Active Member

    1,637
    2
    0
    Nov 23, 2008
    The arlon is great for low energy stuff. I got it specifically for labelling onto a wide variety of substrates. The print quality is superb I have to say. Reading the data sheet, it says you really need to cure the print well before laminating, as it's more prone to shrinking. Especially true for images with high ink levels with bleed. This is apparently the trade off for a wetter, more aggressive adhesive.

    I recently stuck an A5 photo onto some bare metal with some welded ID lettering and heated/rivet brushed it in. Went down well, and still hasn't popped back up or anything. It's been around 3 or 4 days but already I'm not able to peel it off as one piece. I would not want to be involved with the removal of this stuff! lol
     
Loading...

Share This Page

 


Loading...