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Post Script or True Type?

Discussion in 'Fonts and Typography' started by SB Graphix, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. SB Graphix

    SB Graphix New Member

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    I am purchasing some new fonts to use on my mac. I have the Adobe Suite I'm just trying to decide which type to order post script or true type? I've done some reading on them and it seems as though they are pretty similar these days. Does anyone have any recommendations?

    Thanks
     
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  2. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    I don't know that TrueType has improved or not but PostScript Type 1 has historically had some benefits over TrueType. One difference is that the TrueType standard uses more nodes to define a shape than does PostScript. Comparing a perfect circle, PostScript uses four nodes and TrueType uses eight ... therefore larger file sizes and potentially slower plotting with TrueType.
     
  3. Shovelhead

    Shovelhead Major Contributor

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    Open Type
     
  4. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    [​IMG] Agreed but that wasn't the question.
     
  5. Shovelhead

    Shovelhead Major Contributor

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    I know.....feeling frisky!!!!
     
  6. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    [​IMG] I'm available Big Boy ... [​IMG]
     
  7. SB Graphix

    SB Graphix New Member

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    Is open type different yet? Or similar to true type?
     
  8. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    Open Type is cross platform and contains considerably more extra characters. It is currently supported by and recommended by most of the major foundries and type manufacturers.
     
  9. SB Graphix

    SB Graphix New Member

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    So it sounds like open typre is really the way to go?

    Thank you for all of the great information!
     
  10. SirSlarty

    SirSlarty Member

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    From what I understand:

    Open Type -> Post Script -> True Type

    And I think Open Type has better auto kerning (I think). Lots of True Type fonts seem to really have screwed up kerning.
     
  11. GK

    GK Very Active Member

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    I always thought a circle takes twelve points in PostScript & eight in TrueType...

    Anyway, some other benefits to consider when dealing with TTF or OTF fonts is, all the data is stored in one file unlike PostScript where file one contains the character outlines, and the other contains metrics data (character widths and kern pairs) and god forbid you move one without the other or worse...delete one. :rolleyes: You will find that most big font foundries are converting their archives to OTF if they used to be in PostScript. The cross-platform compatibility is key.
     
  12. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    Here's a quick pic of what I'm talking about. The "O" on the left is from a PostScript or OpenType version of Adobe Garamond. It has four nodes for each path. The "O" on the right is a TrueType ITC Garamond and it has eight nodes per path.
     

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  13. OldPaint

    OldPaint Major Contributor

    back in the days of 386-486 pc processors, TYPE 1fonts were a lot better. i found this out back when i started cutting from COREL 3. the TT fonts that was provided by corel, most of the script fonts was loaded with nodes. you didnt see this till you sent it to plotter. at the time my plotter was a 15 ips(straight line)speed. give it some node laden corel font and it sorta creeped along...reading its next move.
    at that time also you had to have ATM, adobe type manager, if you wanted to use TYPE 1 fonts. now thake the same looking font from TYPE 1 and feed it to the 15 ips plotter and a 386 processor with 4 megs a ram....it would cut the TYPE 1 in about half the time it took to cut a TT. also back then the MAC seemed to be the PRINTERS main tool. and a lot of printed stuff that you would try to recreate, was done with TYPE 1 fonts. yes type 1 fonts have less nodes, are cleaner when cutting. BUT with 2.8 gig processors, 2 gigs a ram, plotter cuttin at 50 ips, XP/VISTA now can use em without any ATM, i dont think you will see a marked differance.
     
  14. Steve C.

    Steve C. Very Active Member

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    It is the format that is superior not the font. True Type can be the same
    quality as for as the vector is concerned. It just takes more space. I have
    found that with TTF many control points can be eliminated with out
    compromising the integrity of the vector. While on the other hand, Open
    Type PostScript can be created with fewer control points, but will cause
    problems in some programs with contours and outlines, so more points must
    be added.
     
  15. Steve C.

    Steve C. Very Active Member

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    Also, when fonts are created as Type 1 first, then converted to TTF, this
    will add thousands of unneeded nodes. If it is created as TTF first you get
    much better quality. Especially if you are willing to spend the time going thru
    glyph by glyph to delete the needless controle points.
     
  16. Steve C.

    Steve C. Very Active Member

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    Again, it depends on the creater of the font. Auto kerning is the same for all,
    but some fonts have no kerned pairs while others may have thousands.
     
  17. Rooster

    Rooster Very Active Member

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    Open type has far superior kerning.

    OpenType has all the benefits of truetype and postscript formats plus additional features that neither has. Such as the ability to use auto ligatures, etc.

    It's also completely cross platform. Same disk/file for both mac and PC platforms. No freaky cross-platform font substitutions!
     
  18. Steve C.

    Steve C. Very Active Member

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    Not to argue the point, because I am, by no means, an expert.
    FontLab. the program used by most foundrys, sets kerning exactly the same
    way for one as it does for the other. Could be there is something I am
    missing. OpenType is a superior format for many reasons. For purposes of
    cut vinyl, The vector is the same, except for the number of nodes.

    I am fairly new to FontLab but, From what I know, all fonts are first created
    in a FontLab file,(.vfb). From there they can be generated to Type1 (.pfb),
    True Type (.ttf) or OpenType(.otf). The only other font software I am familiar
    with is The Font Creator Program, which only gererates TTF. Auto kerning is
    just a matter of entering the number of vertical coordinates you want between
    two specific glyphs.
     
  19. Rooster

    Rooster Very Active Member

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    Opentype supports optical kerning.

    Postscript and truetype do not.
     
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