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Printer for Pop Up Displays & Exhibitions

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Printers' started by andy, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. andy

    andy Active Member

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    Aug 19, 2004
    I am looking for some advice on printers for producing Pop Up display panels, banner stand inserts and exhibition graphics.

    The max width I'm looking at is around 1200mm although 1m would be OK.

    I'm not looking for a solvent machine or a print and cut setup- i'd rather buy a tried and tested inkjet type machine that uses ordinary inks.

    I have great suppliers of the pop up frames and banner stands so I'm looking for a way to apply the finished graphics.

    We have a cold laminator if this has any bearing?

    Thanks for your input.
    Andy :)
     
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  2. Scott Reynolds

    Scott Reynolds Active Member

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    Feb 5, 2005
    For indoor only type stuff, you could pick up a used dye based 60" HP or Encad for 1500-2000 GBP.
     
  3. andy

    andy Active Member

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    Aug 19, 2004
    thanks for that mate- I hadn't considered second hand- and for what I need- sounds like a good idea.

    I see adverts for this new printer and that new printer all the time so I guess there are plenty trade in's and the like available.

    I did a quick google based on your suggestion and found a Mutoh RJ-6100 42" machine for around 2500 UK£. Anyone know anything about this machine?

    It's a dealer machine so there is 12 months warranty on it- whether or not it's a useful warranty is of course another thing :)

    So- are Mutoh's and good I wonder?

    Cheers
    Andy
     
  4. Scott Reynolds

    Scott Reynolds Active Member

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    Feb 5, 2005
    Shop around before you buy. The deal on the RJ-6100 sounds OK, but a newer and wider Mutoh 46" RJ-6100 (the dye based Rockhopper) should sale in the UK for around 4,250 GBP, NEW. If you can afford it I would get the newer 46" printer. In the US its hard to find alot of 42" rolls of matteriel. The 46" RJ will take a 48" roll. If 2,500 GBP is want you want to spend, the 42" with the warranty would work.
     
  5. JMDigital

    JMDigital Active Member

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    Oct 15, 2005
    Be aware that when you buy this you will start to want to make other signs . Dont get upset 1 year later and say "I should have got the print/cut machine.. or If I only had the solvent I could bid that job.

    I had a nice ENCAD PRO 600e , it would be great for what you are thinking. 600DPI Use FLEXI PRO and the prints will be great! Keep that laminator! Make some nice $$$ and when you want to do more you can afford to get another printer!

    I was bitten by the digital prints because I got a CROMA 24 (for FREE!) 3 years ago.. and now have a ROLAND CJ500 and still going strong..
     
  6. Scott Reynolds

    Scott Reynolds Active Member

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    Feb 5, 2005
    I still have my last 60" Encad 700. I havent fired it up in a couple years. I should get rid of it. It was the lastest and greatest in the late 90's. The last Encad I bought was $18,500. It might be worth $1,200-$1,400. :rolleyes:
     
  7. RobGF

    RobGF Member

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    Jul 22, 2005
    I guess I'd answer this question with another: What's your market like?

    Depending on your market you might find that picking up an old Encad doesn't satisfy certain customers because of the relatively low quality of its output... Some customers, not all, are willing to pay a bit more to have superlative work and even the latest Encad 1000i does not come close to the quality of output available with an HP5500 series system (I have both here). Epson's are an option as well but they aren't as fast as the HP. I am sure others are worth consideration.

    Going the HP route or any dye based aquious printer will not put you into the sign game so this print setup would have to be specific to indoor prints, tradeshows, etc.

    You could go ecosolvent, I suppose, but a dye based printer with good profiling can produce much richer colour than solvent and this certainly matters in the world of high-impact corporate graphics.

    Your cold laminator will work fine but many vendors have nice little matching trade show components that run thermal and thermal isn't nearly as expensive as pressure.

    So, what level of quality do you need to produce? Do you have to match or exceed the quality of others or is it price only? Can you live with a non-outdoor printer?

    Just some thoughts...
     
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