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Printing alluminium

Discussion in 'Flatbed Printers' started by tomasimattia, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. tomasimattia

    tomasimattia New Member

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    My company wont buy a flatbed printer for printing on prepainted aluminum. There are same problem with ocè/fujifilm printer ko/ki ink (indoor/outdoor)? My best preference are from Durst Omega 1... thank for all replies!
     
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  2. ChicagoGraphics

    ChicagoGraphics Major Contributor

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    Welcome to Signs 101
     
  3. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Welcome from Pennsylvania.....................
     
  4. J Hill Designs

    J Hill Designs Major Contributor

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    welcome from cali, USA :thumb:

    not sure how to reply to a seemingly non-question
     
  5. tomasimattia

    tomasimattia New Member

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    i write from italy... sorry for my english! i want know if same one have experience about printing on prepainted alliumumin with similar printer....
     
  6. Ditchmiester

    Ditchmiester Active Member

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    I've printed on pre-painted aluminum with a Colorspan 72UVR and have had good results with adhesion.
     
  7. FireSprint.com

    FireSprint.com Trade Only Screen & Digital Sign Printing

    Welcome from Omaha!

    We screenprint ours.
     
  8. Nicky Zhou

    Nicky Zhou Vastek

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    We are using Oce 550GT to do similar job. To get a good adhesion on such media, we need to use max power of UV lamp, then everything doing great.

    We try on Oce 318GT, and 350GT,360GT, seems not as good as 550GT. By the way, we are using flexiable ink.
     
  9. rubo

    rubo Member

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    you don't need a flatbed to print on aluminum. Ask me how I know :biggrin:
     
  10. tomasimattia

    tomasimattia New Member

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    Jun 18, 2012
    italy
    how i can print on aluminum without flatbed printer ??
     
  11. HulkSmash

    HulkSmash Major Contributor

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    oce and fuji will work fine. Durst seems like overkill for just printing on aluminum.
     
  12. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Yes, please explain how you've figured a way to by-pass digital vinyl and print directly to a piece of aluminum without any profiles for durability. :popcorn:
     
  13. J Hill Designs

    J Hill Designs Major Contributor

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    I seem to remember a few years ago someone mentioned putting .040 alum. in their r2r solvent and it worked...cant remember for the life of me who it was tho
     
  14. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Oh yes..... you can do it, but there won't be any reason to do it, as in almost all cases, the ink won't last printed directly onto aluminum, designated for digital media of some sort.

    I can put pancake batter in a spray gun and spray it on a car and even clear coat it, but it won't last.

    There's no need to print to something your printer isn't designed to do, unless you've made some major changes.... which no one mentioned yet.
     
  15. luehrslogistics

    luehrslogistics Member

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    Sepiax
     
  16. ChicagoGraphics

    ChicagoGraphics Major Contributor

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    I tryed printing 0.32 aluminum with my JV3 and it worked, the only thing is if your going to print large sheets I would build some type of tables to butt up against the printer so the material doesn't flap while going into the printer causing head strikes.
     
  17. rubo

    rubo Member

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    Sorry guys and girls, was gone for a while - the aluminum printing without a flat bed is quite simple - I do that all day long - on my Epson 9700 - there are s%^% load of ink receptive coatings, just rub it on the aluminum sheet, dry it w heat gun, stick it into the printer and print away. Make sure the printer is against the wall so you can lean the sheet - taking some weight off the printer. Then you can finish with automotive clear coat - I have powder coating shop next door, so I go that route - but automotive clear coat is as good. The whole concept of a flatbed printer is overrated imo - why can't you print on a media of choice and mount the thick substrate? That's not to say that I don't have one - I do, but I built one myself - just couldn't stomach shelling out that much $ for
    couple of actuators. Going to print some tomorrow - will take a video for you to see.:toasting:
     
  18. rubo

    rubo Member

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    All the above - " to avoid the vinyl and laminate costs?" - but it's a collateral benefit - the visuals are unbelievable - after coating the image pops out off the surface, the sheen and all...You have to see it to appreciate. No way one can achieve same with vinyl or whatnot. The client is an artist/photographer, I do some 20 - 25 pieces a month for the guy and it gets only better. Here is the video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=5VH_CvN8ZMs
     
  19. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    It's a rather nice ending to a need out of necessity, but the OP's question was if you can print directly to aluminum with something other than a flatbed.

    I think most took it to mean just that.... directly.

    All the extra steps are manageable, but I personally, would not want to do that routinely. You'd never be capable of staying competitive with other flatbeds.
     
  20. smdgrfx

    smdgrfx Member

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    There's a guy named Alan that is on here and has converted a few R2R printers to flatbeds...He would be interested in seeing that Epson working for sure....
     
  21. rubo

    rubo Member

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    Yeah, it's brushed aluminum. I do print on stainless steel, copper, bronze - you name it - pushing the printer to limits - the worst thing is gonna happen the sheet will slide trough - never happened yet. I've printed sheets as large as 40x60. Sometimes I'll have to adjust the paper feed, nothing more...
     
  22. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    hey guys... yup. printed exclusively flat .040 aluminum, and veneer on my flatbed jv3 for about eight years straight. you'll need to build two air (air hockey style) tables with some guides and feather boards. it works quite well for 4x6... a bit iffy past that. i've printed as big as 5x10, and 4x12 but would keep that to artistic purposes rather than signage.

    all this was done with the jv3 (and a lot more)
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/alldredge/sets/72157627000489887/

    i'm lucky to have an early CET 6x10 (16 head) flatbed now. getting used to the workflow and doing my mods to it currently.

    here's what the rig looked like.
     

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  23. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    the secret is to have the material head very slightly down hill into the nip then exit very slightly uphill. this puts a mild reverse crown on the material. using this method, the sheet will be drawn through the printer (almost) without the pinch rollers down. straight through works, but not as well.

    it's hilarious and just plain wrong what i did this poor house to get where i had to go. you can see the kitchen in the background. i now have a 33,000 square foot building and we've gone through about $400,000 and climbing setting it up (with all used equipment, save the limac cnc). funny thing is, in a few days i now, according to my eight year old divorce decree, have to put the house up for sale in two weeks. perfect timing if you ask me.
     

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