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Questions about spoilboard

Discussion in 'CNC Routing & Laser Cutting' started by dk666, Jan 22, 2008.

  1. dk666

    dk666 New Member

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    Jan 20, 2008
    I need to set up a vacume table with a spoilboard. Has anyone done this or have any information ?

    This is a DIY project we have a very limited budget. We currently have a TECHNO LC 3024.

    Cheers,

    DK
     
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  2. mgieske

    mgieske Member

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    A good tip would be to use ball valves to establish at least 4 zones, so you may concentrate the vac power to specific areas when cutting small parts.
     
  3. Doug Weaver

    Doug Weaver New Member

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    Use Formica brand 1/2" thick "hard surface", it is phenolic, a very hard material that will create a great vacuum chamber. When you make the box, you will need strips inside the box to support the center and to keep the vacuum from drawing the center down. These strips will also create zones for vacuum. This along with the use of ball valves as suggested will allow you to be able to control the zones. When assembling the box, use a small amount of silicone caulk to seal the box and to prevent vacuum loss. Mount this to the bed of your CNC and drill the top of the box with 1/8" dia. holes for the vacuum to draw through. Lastly, mount 1/2 MDF on top of this as your spoil board. Mill the spoil board down so you have a level working surface. The vacuum will draw through the spoil board and will hold down the material you are routing. How well it will hold down will be determined by the size and type of vacuum pump that you incorporate into the system. I have made a number of hold down jigs for my CNC from "hard surface". This material is awesome; it is virtually indestructible and will last forever. Good Luck!
     
  4. Typestries

    Typestries Very Active Member

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    we suck through LOW DENSITY MDf sheet for a spoilboard. We get it from fessenden hall in pennsauken nj. it does provide better suction than regular MDF
     
  5. k.a.s.

    k.a.s. Very Active Member

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    I have always used 1/2" MDF, it works pretty well. I will have to cheack out the Low density stuff that Typestries was talking about.

    Kevin
     
  6. Goatboy

    Goatboy Member

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    Jan 10, 2008
    Ultra light MDF here
     
  7. Columbia Signs

    Columbia Signs Member

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    Do not use MDF. MDF is Mediem Density Fiberboard. Use LDF or Low Denisty Fiberboard.

    Once you have the table all squared up and the vacuum hooked up use a 2 1/2"" SPOILBOARD SURFACER bit (Onsrud 91-102) and mill the top side... Then flip the LDF over and surface the other side. At that point you will have a perfectly flat spoil board with a best suction possible. When routing leave an onion skin thickness above your spoil board and it will be perfect for a long time.
     
  8. Goatboy

    Goatboy Member

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    Jan 10, 2008
    Ultra light MDF if you use a mister...LDF goes mushy..just my experience. The ultralight part gives more then enough hold on even aluminum. Onion skin is ok but requires perfect spoil surface to be useful. LDF has a great love for ambient moisture as all fiberboards do. Since MDF has less actual air inbetween you get less warp then LDF. The holddown comes in the Ultralight...if it means anything its Boeing approved
     
  9. John L

    John L Very Active Member

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    I use 3/4" Trupan® Ultralight as the spoilboard. First, surface both sides to expose the inner "more breathable" core and it lets the most cfm through of anything I've tried before (lots of different MDF's). Vacuum HG holds things tight but cfm is what makes up for through cuts and will keep things in place as you are cutting kerfs throughout the work.
     
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