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WHat to buy?

Discussion in 'Business Management' started by Hog Wild graphics, Apr 12, 2011.

  1. Hog Wild graphics

    Hog Wild graphics Member

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    I am about to purchase somemore equipment. I currently do signs banners decals and magnets etc. I also do screenprint tshirts and vinyl tshirts. I already have a Roland sp300

    Trying to decide between a 48 mutoh so I can print larger banners and get into vehicle wraps or a direct to garment tshirt machine so I can do small orders and create designs that are difficult tho screen.

    I am over 40 miles from any competition in these areas. In your opinion what is the best move. Both are going to cost about the same. I'm wanting best ROI.

    Thanks
     
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  2. Sticky Signs

    Sticky Signs Very Active Member

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    Get a 54" printer/cutter. Worth the extra $$$.
     
  3. juan45215

    juan45215 Member

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    I have never heard anyone say that they're glad they bought a DTG printer. I also would not buy printer less than 54". You need at least 50" material to make a 4 foot banner.
     
  4. Malkin

    Malkin Very Active Member

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    Agree. As you are already using a roland, it would simplify things to make the next machine a roland as well.

    This will allow you to do bigger jobs instead of smaller ones. Also, maybe you could use a heat press to do small run t-shirt designs?
     
  5. HulkSmash

    HulkSmash Major Contributor

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    T shirts - too much work - not enough money
     
  6. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

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    ++++on a bigger roland machine. I have three 54's and one 30 and love them. I have had Roland stuff since 1988 and love the quality, in fact I still run a roland plotter I got in 1994, still runs like a champ!!!
     
  7. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    Usually it's the ones that try to do dark garment printing that regret having them. From what I recall it's the printing of the white ink.

    OP: What do you get more request for now? More complex shirts or bigger solvent printed products? Now just because you are getting the interest now doesn't mean that it will still be there after you order the stuff, but get what seems to generate the most interest.

    Around here I do far better with garments than banners as oddly enough there are less that do the garment end then the printed end. That just may not be what you have to work with though.
     
  8. cdiesel

    cdiesel Very Active Member

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    We had a DTG printer, and like WWD said, the white sucked. Problem was, every order was on dark shirts.

    I agree with everyone else--buy a 54" machine. One thing to consider too is that if you buy a larger printer, you can sell your 300. If you buy a DTG printer, you still need to keep the 300.
     
  9. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

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    UUUH Mix in some screen printing....No money in one off shirts, I see shops all the time start and fail trying!!! If you are looking to do less than 12 shirts an order, just GIVE UP!!! Trust me, I have bought several shop's equipment that have tryed doing one-offs when they closed up.
     
  10. klemgraphics

    klemgraphics Active Member

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    Yeah one offs are a waste of time, no money there, I would go for a 54" printer for sure if I were you. And if you still insist on doing the one offs you can print and cut heat transfers and you won't have to maintain another machine.
     
  11. Edserv

    Edserv Member

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    We love our Mutoh 48 vj1204 (also have a GBC 40" cold/hot lam). I used to own an embroidery small business, and haven't much experience in the garment industry other than that. But our Mutoh runs constantly, and for jobs (wider car wraps mostly) we job out the panels to Lowen. I can't imagine running our shop without our Mutoh, GBC, and Flexi Sign Pro.
    Chris
     
  12. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    I would recommend doing the embroidery machine before a DTG if the OP is wanting to get into the garment end.

    Embroidery, then sublimation, then vinyl is the order in frequency of requests that I get for shirts. A few regular heat transfer stuff, but I stopped doing that. Very rarely doing I get asked if I do DTG. I had toyed with getting one, but until there is a consistent fix for the white ink I think I'll stay on the sidelines for that one.
     
  13. Hog Wild graphics

    Hog Wild graphics Member

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    Thanks for your opinions.

    I appreciate the advice. Really just needed the extra boost to get a bigger printer. I felt with the bigger printer I will be moving into larger
    more profitible jobs instead of grinding out $10 at a time on tshirts.

    For the people that discuss embroidery. I have owned a buradan multihead for 6 years. Had it in my house for parttime work then decided to buy small sign and tshirt shop and moved it in town. That's my cash cow just looking for next good investment.

    Again thanks. Hope to spend more time on forum.
     
  14. Stealth Ryder

    Stealth Ryder Very Active Member

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    The 48 accepts 50" media and it is a great machine... Forget the 54, if you want larger then step on up to the 64....
     
  15. WildWestDesigns

    WildWestDesigns Major Contributor

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    Yea, I would do the bigger printer. I have been tempted with DTG every now and again, but a couple of people that I've talked to have said even though they have a printer that can do both lights and darks, they only have lights. They just don't want to deal with the white. I'll stick with sublimation if that's the case. I'll do either vinyl or embroidery for the darks if they need the darks.
     
  16. Edserv

    Edserv Member

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    Banners, are (almost by far) our best $ per labor hour product/service.

    My least favorite:
    1) contour cut letters (especially the small ones) often only a $20 - $100 order than can be a nightmare.
    2) car wraps (at least at this point. So many areas to mess-up, and so labor-intensive.)
    3) contour-cut decals/stickers, etc, especially when the borders are tight and someone new is trying to work the cutter.
     
  17. Mike_Koval

    Mike_Koval Active Member

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    i would also go with a larger printer. too much headache and limitations. I love the technology of DTG and the idea in them, but we don't feel they are there yet and that is why we don't sell one yet. When they are perfected, i will be the first to say DTG all the way.

    The good news is you can produce transfers with the printer.

    And you can make a great profit from short run shirts. Majority of our customer base are creating apparel for team wear, and one off t's, sweats, jackets, etc. Though plenty of market research and speaking with customers, getting $15-$25 for one 1-10 shirts full color on darks is common. Why, no one else is going to do that sort of run. I've seen alot of awesome graphics on here that have been created and that alone will sell the shirt for 15-25 bucks...easy. Apparel is easy to up sell too. Add a sleeve placement or name, offer a metallic, neon or glitter for the ladies...easy $5 add on. Believe me, i've seen this and watched customers buy this without hesitations. What the customer see's is a personalized piece of apparel that is different and made just for them.

    Are you going to do a simple few color design for in 12 12+ quantity with a transfer and get 15 to 25 bucks, probably not. But trust me, for low quantities and personalized items, you can turn a great profit with transfers.
     
  18. rushworks graphics

    rushworks graphics Very Active Member

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    mike, what would you recommend for a good quality transfer material for us to try out on our roland vp540i ?? its something i would like to try on a tshirt myself, so any suggestions on a decent quality material would be appreciated
    thanks
     
  19. SignStudent

    SignStudent Member

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    I have tried 4 different brands and was always unhappy until I switched to Quick Print from Mike at Imprintables Warehouse. Unlike some other brands it soaks up the ink well so the prints look good, and when you wash/dry it the stuff doesn't get really wrinkly and look terrible.
     
  20. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

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    I have a hard time decideing between bud-lite and busch-lite. BIGGER IS BETTER!!!
     
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