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When your logo needs a pinch runner

Discussion in 'Logo Design' started by James Burke, Aug 28, 2019.

  1. James Burke

    James Burke Being a grandpa is more fun than working

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    When you wish to break tradition and use something other than your business logo to watermark a photo https://photologo.co

    The artistic "human element" surely shines through. It's obviously not for every situation. But they really do some nice looking work.

    Can you say "Wacom Envy"?





    JB
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2019
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  2. woolly

    woolly Active Member

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    brilliant, skillful, even Wacom envy

    problem is

    i can't read half of them so might as well put a X in the corner.

    or is it just me missing the point. trendy yes but good advertising not sure.
     
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  3. For photographers who sign their names like doctors, I guess.

    $50 for one in 24 hours, $40 in 48, and $39 in 7 days?? I have a feeling this is someone's hobby business.
     
  4. jmcnicoll

    jmcnicoll Member

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    Don't get it, that's pretty simple to do. Don't even need a Wacom for it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
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  5. Johnny Best

    Johnny Best Very Active Member

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    james2.jpg
     
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  6. James Burke

    James Burke Being a grandpa is more fun than working

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    Heh....I grew up in a time where cursive was taught since first grade. In my mom's generation, cursive was the gold standard, and I envy her beautiful handwriting.

    My problem is that I'm left handed and my letters don't slant...matter of fact they look pretty crummy. Sad thing it is. There's a huge difference between pushing and pulling a pen, (or quill brush for that matter). I'd be interested in watching how the lefty signwriters did their magic.

    Dad should have been left handed, but that was a time when fountain pens were king and ink smears were the devil. They essentially beat the left-handedness right out of him. His penmanship was dang near that of a doctor...and I always blamed his short-sighted teachers back in the day.

    I tried Leonardo daVinci's method of mirror writing and I discovered that I can write BEAUTIFUL cursive backwards...flowing letters, slants and all.

    Maybe I just need to write it backwards on a Wacom and then mirror it....huh, never crossed my mind until just now. Still...it's very limited compared to being able to make it work when writing correctly.

    JB
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
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  7. Johnny Best

    Johnny Best Very Active Member

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    I did your name with a Speedball pen and they are slanted nibs for righthanders. But, Speedball use to make the flat nibs that slanted the other way for lefthanders. When I was in first grade in Catholic school the nuns would take the lefthanded kid outside and stomp on their left hand with those high top black shoes they wore. When they came back in those kids were using the right hand. Your father probably shies away from women in black shoes.
     
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  8. James Burke

    James Burke Being a grandpa is more fun than working

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    I remember using Speedball pens in art class in the late 70s. It was fun, but my work could never rival that of my right-handed counterparts.. I strongly suspect that Mrs. Smith gave me right-handed nibs....dang her.

    I should give it another try...maybe this time with Hebrew, Aramaic, or Arabic...since they're all written right to left.

    Ha, ha...I never got a chance to discuss the matter with dad. I'm sure he'd have much to say about it. Never the less, I passed that trait along to my son who appears to be totally left-side dominate.

    My daughter's 4-year-old son is a lefty. He's also auburn haired and blue-eyed which is a very rare combination. Research suggests that lefty gingers are relatively common, though.

    Nothing pleases this papa more than seeing that little guy scrawling out something with that southpaw...complete with his tongue hanging out for extra dexterity.


    JB
     
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  9. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    My Dad had the same treatment. He was forced to become a rightie. When he was alive, he could write or print with either hand.... and both very legible. My brother, however was truly ambidextrous. He could also write backwards and all kindsa crazy ways with either hand. I do most things right-handed, but when it comes down to it, I almost always use my left hand for doing most things. I think at a very early age, I might've been taught to change over. I still can paint and letter with my left.

    About the greatest hand-letterer I ever knew was a leftie, but taught himself to letter right-handed. When properly lettering, there's no way to do shocard or most lettering left-handed without wiping your hand or arm through the paint, unless you use a mahl stick. How many people use a mahl stick for shocard ??
     
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