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Which Table Saw for PVC, Aluminum, Dibon

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Hardware' started by KevSign, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. KevSign

    KevSign Member

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    I am about ready to get our own table saw to cut material in-house. The guy from Sign-mart took me in the back they have couple Powermatic table saw to cut supply every day for client. Wondering any one get difference brand will work instead to get Powermatic.

    Thank you!
     
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  2. Z SIGNS

    Z SIGNS Very Active Member

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    I would by a panel saw before I bought a table saw.Takes up less room and easier to operate.
     
  3. d fleming

    d fleming Very Active Member

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    +1, Best case scenario, panel and a table saw. Also a fletcher terry wall mount or comparable for coro, foamcore, etc. blade for panel and table most likely triple chip carbide.
     
  4. Hicalibersigns

    Hicalibersigns Member

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    Powermatics are nice but expensive. Frankly, if you are a cabinetmaker, then a Powermatic makes sense. If you are chopping up pieces of Dibond or whatever, a decent contractor's type saw will suffice for much less money. This one is $529.00. Add a good quality ATB carbide blade for another $100.00 and you are in business for many years. You ain't gonna get a Powermatic for anywhere near that.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/202500206?productId=202500206&storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=202500206&ci_kw=%7bkeyword%7d&kwd=%7bkeyword%7d&cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-202500206&ci_gpa=pla#.UU-WPhx_BsY
     
  5. CanuckSigns

    CanuckSigns Very Active Member

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    We used to use a table saw for cutting down substrates, it worked out well, but even with a large saw it was a 2 person job to cut a full 4x8 sheet.

    We bought a Fletcher Keen-Cut Steeltrak, it does a great job on PVC, Acrylic, Dibond, Coro and foamcore, plus cutting is now a one person operation, and no mess.

    We still need a table saw for cutting plywood, but we find ourselves using it less and less.

    the substrates you listed look like they can be cut with a keen cut, it's worth looking into.
     
  6. John Butto

    John Butto Very Active Member

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    I am one of the believers in table saws. You can make anything with them, from a house down to fine furniture. Have had a Delta for years and have it set up for a one man to cut 4x8's. Just have a large selection of blades to cut different materials. You can make jigs to cut the precise angles, dados, frames, the list is endless. If you are just interested to rip basic material down then just get a Fletcher as suggested or a panel saw. But with a table saw if the sign business does not work out, you can always make kitchen cabinets.
     
  7. SignosaurusRex

    SignosaurusRex Major Contributor

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    More important than which brand of saw you chose to fit your needs is the particular style blades and tooth count per blade you choose for various substrates.
     
  8. SIGNTIME

    SIGNTIME Active Member

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    We have the keencut steeltrack and a table saw... I use the keencut everyday and its great. I haven't used the table saw in 3 or 4 months, last week I could of used it, but I decided to just clamp a straight edge to substrate and hit with the skill saw, saved me the hassle of lugging out the table saw and stand.
     
  9. Billct2

    Billct2 Major Contributor

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    Panel saw first, table second.
     
  10. fixtureman

    fixtureman Member

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    A dewalt track saw with the 104inch track and 54 inch track you can take it to the job site or use it in house to break down material
     
  11. threeputt

    threeputt Very Active Member

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    As stated in previous posts, any decent contractors saw will do nicely. Be sure to build a nice "run-out" table and you can handle 4'x8' sheets by yourself.

    Secondly, build yourself a nice "cut-off box" to go with it. I can supply photos of our set up if needed but it's pretty straight forward stuff.

    But.......the blade is the main thing. Get a super decent blade. 80-100 teeth carbide.
     
  12. johnnysigns

    johnnysigns Very Active Member

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    That rigid linked up there is not worth the $500 price tag. We have the same unit and after 6 months it's pretty banged up.
     
  13. SignManiac

    SignManiac Major Contributor

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    Table saw is nice if you have the room to set it up properly with in-feed and out-feed tables to support your material. I have a panel saw, two table saws set up properly along with a slew of other specialized wood working tools.

    Also, look on Craigslist for a good commercial table saw that's used. I picked up a good Delta saw along with a serious planer and dust collector for $800 total. Both tools new would have been about $3k
     
  14. ol'phart

    ol'phart Member

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    I've had a powermatic table saw for years. If your looking for a table saw then buy the powermatic. Worth every penny
     
  15. rjssigns

    rjssigns Major Contributor

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    I have a Powermatic with the Vega fence system. Can go 52" to the right of blade. 1/32" in 96". I run the 7 1/4" Oldham laminate blades for ACM and foam-pvc.

    Also TIG'ed up a 4-wheel stand so it's easy to move where I need it. Can slide the fence off the end and have a big work surface too.
     
  16. Sign Works

    Sign Works Very Active Member

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    Let's not forget a quality Biesemeyer fence.
     
  17. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    track saw. it's the only tool that can do the "don't try this with a table saw" which is often what is needed in sign making vs cabinetry an construction.
     
  18. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

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    Vertical panel saw, we use several different blades, depends on what we are cutting. Not even turned the table saw on in 3-4 years...
     
  19. Salmoneye

    Salmoneye Very Active Member

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    I am now a track saw believer 100%. Way more accurate than any panel saw or table saw I have ever had. Way safer too. Takes up almost 0 space, ours travels to jobsites as well. We use the Dewalt cordless, every time I use this thing I am impressed. You can find good deals on e-bay. We use a 2 piece track that joins together, like 54"? for 4' cuts and you attach another for 8 or 10' cuts. My table saw now sits collecting dust.
     
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