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Wood sign

Discussion in 'General Signmaking Topics' started by BMW113073, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. BMW113073

    BMW113073 New Member

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    Here is my first post and first question. I am in the process of using vinyl as a stencil on a wood surface to be painted over then removed. The wood is in a raw form no paint or primer. My question, What vinyl would you recommend that would stick to the wood well enough not to be pulled away when removing the application tape, or vise versa? I am looking at Oracal 641,631 which application tape do you guys think would work.
    Thanks…Braden
     
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  2. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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    What you want is a paint mask vinyl. Here's a link to the choices offered by my usual vendor. The transfer tape choice shouldn't be a problem ... most will work just fine.
     
  3. Billct2

    Billct2 Major Contributor

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    You're going to apply a vinyl mask to raw wood, paint, then remove the mask, so where the stencil was placed it will still be raw wood?
     
  4. SignManiac

    SignManiac Major Contributor

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    without a perfectly smooth wood surface or sealing the wood you stand a good chance of having the paint bleed along the mask edge.
     
  5. BMW113073

    BMW113073 New Member

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    Mar 27, 2011
    Thank you very much, so I would guess the Avery sf100-128-s or even the Oracal 813, 810 should work just fine I was just worried that the adhesion to the wood compared to the tape would be insufficient but I will give them a shot. Do you recommend any application tape that you think would be the best for my purpose?
     
  6. BMW113073

    BMW113073 New Member

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    Mar 27, 2011
    Bill, yep raw wood then a light clear coat over it. I have done it both ways, you just get better penetration from the paint to raw wood. SignManiac, you do a few lighter coats compared to just one shot that way bleeding is minimal.
     
  7. mrchips

    mrchips Member

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    I'm just wondering ........ is the raw wood going to be the exposed face of this sign when finished? What kind of wood are you using?

    Thanks,

    Joe,

    Makin Chip$ and Havin Fun!
     
  8. BMW113073

    BMW113073 New Member

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    Mar 27, 2011
    Yes, you will see raw wood with a clear coat and we use all types of wood but mostly Catalpa and Maple
     
  9. mrchips

    mrchips Member

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    I was just wondering why not clearcoat first, then mask and paint? That would solve any bleed issues and your mask won't pull up any fibers.....tho with maple I don't think it would be a problem.

    I LOVE Catalpa!!!

    I saw your site.......nice carvings!
    Your business is certainly not a one trick pony by any means. Kool!

    Thanks,

    Joe,

    Makin Chip$ and Havin Fun!
     
  10. Craig Sjoquist

    Craig Sjoquist Major Contributor

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    yes clear coat the wood FIRST.. like Mr Chips says, was wondering myself why you would not do that first.
     
  11. TyrantDesigner

    TyrantDesigner Art! Hot and fresh.

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    Like everyone said, clear coat first. Make sure the clear coat and paint will match (i.e. no spray paint on urethane or oiled enamel on acrylic sealers, etc) ... clear coat doesn't need to be overly applied, I've gotten by with one coat of clear enamel on my enamel jobs since the first layer sucks right into the wood and prevents any bleeding when fully cured. I like about 3 layers though. Also make sure you clear coat over the top of the paint when you are done, softens the edge of the area you applied the mask and helps it prevent oxidation of the paint.
     
  12. thetimberwindranch

    thetimberwindranch New Member

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    Jun 17, 2009
    splinters..

    If the vinyl is too agressive it will pull off wood ( small but can be a real issue) when the stencil itself is removed. A low tack stencil vinyl mask is best or you can rub the adhesive with your hand or across your pant leg to "lower" the tackiness before application..depending on the size and all. It's a balance of tacky enough to stick to the wood and not the transfer paper..I've even sprayed the sticky side of the transfer paper with a light coat of flat clear before pressing onto the cut vinyl to "adjust" the tacky level.
    You can get some very cool effects by spraying stains or candy colors this way to simulate stained wood. If you want a crisp lettering but raw wood color and do not intend to stain or pain the background wood..use Sherwin Williams 24% high solids vinyl sealer on the wood first and it will give you a nice smooth clear surface and protect the grain..it should sanded after it is dry and before applying vinyl. That can also be painted or cleared over with any finish. That will give the vinyl something to stick to so the transfer paper lets go. I don't have the number..but there is a heavy textured vinyl transparent transfer "paper" that is low tack..check that out first.
    :frustrated: Good luck
     
  13. Salmoneye

    Salmoneye Very Active Member

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    I use an airbrush and spray lightly and then it doesn't bleed.
     
  14. Wes Phifer

    Wes Phifer Member

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    I have painted a color close to the color of the wood first(after masking). When it bleeds you can't see it much. Then put the letter color on.
     
  15. BMW113073

    BMW113073 New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies. I am going to give it a shot and see what works best for what I do. We try to incorporate sandcarving into the signs this is where raw wood comes into play. Varnishing the wood first makes the wood harder to work when trying to soften edges. I see a lot of trial and error in my future…….
     
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