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Wrapping a Pillar

Discussion in 'Installation Equipment & Techniques' started by redprint, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. redprint

    redprint Member

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    I have a client that wants two pillars wrapped or decorated with graphics from top to bottom. I am hoping someone has had experience wrapping pillars before and can give me some insight on what technique to install the wrap. Pillars are 140" tall and 84" circumference. Would it be best to wrap 3 sheets around the poles starting at the bottom and going to the top in which would make two horizontal seams and a vertical seam? Or would it be better to wrap it in two pieces overlapping going from top to bottom and having 2 vertical overlaps? Poles have a very slight texture on them and I am thinking about using Phototex so they don't pull the paint off when removing. Anyone have any insight, I would sure appreciate your thoughts and ideas.

    Thanks Everyone!

    IMG_4724 (2).jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2019
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  2. TimToad

    TimToad Very Active Member

    Any cylindrical or curved surface is going to be harder to get seams to match up on, and if you did three pieces going around the entire circumference and stacked, you'd actually have the two horizontal seams to have to match as well as the ends of each of the three pieces. Visually, I think it would look better doing two long half pieces, but depending on the images and how they need to match at the seams, that will be a little bit of a challenge as well.
     
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  3. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

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    I'd go vertical and seam two panels together on the table so you only have to match the ends.
    Tape some cores together and back roll the graphic onto them so you can stand the graphic up from floor to ceiling.
    Use a laser or snap a chalk line to get a plumb line to start the edge.
     
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  4. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Wrapped some pillars, not quite that high or fat, but made sure where they came together, there was nothing to match up. Looked fine when finished. I wrapped horizontally.

    I think at the size you're looking to do, I'd go up and down, also.
     
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  5. Johnny Best

    Johnny Best Very Active Member

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    If you are going to do them in two pieces, drop a level line down from the top and use that for your guide (make pencil lines or tape) as you move downwards installing first piece and match your other piece with that side you use the level line matchup. double cut, if using Phototex, to match up the overlap on the other seam.
     
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  6. iprint

    iprint Member

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    How about a zippered dye-sub column wrap? Installs in minutes and looks amazing. One piece with a vertical seam (zipper). We do these for conventions all the time. The cost saving in install time more than makes up for the added production costs.
     
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  7. redprint

    redprint Member

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    I like this idea. How does this work exactly, would you need to anchor it on top and bottom as well as the zipper so it doesn't fall down? Plus I have an outlet that is flush to the columns that would need to be cut out. Does the fabric stay taught? I see that some places use velcro, would this work as well? Thank you for the information, I appreciate all the responses I have received!
     
  8. Our method is as follows, print 3 vertical tiles, use a liner cutter and make a 10 cm cut in the middle of the tile vertically, use laser guide to align, fix the tile from the middle first then go side ways, etc.....
     

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  9. Beware of using Phototex on textured pillars. We tried it and it wouldn't stick. Just couldn't grab enough and floated on top of the surface. Being that pillars are never perfect cylinders this caused problems as it would lift in a lot of places and look really bad. The product and technique of application will depend on what the customer expects for lifespan and visual.
     
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  10. iprint

    iprint Member

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    No need to anchor it, just make the circumference dimension approximately 1" smaller than your column and let the stretch of the fabric hold it in place. Velcro would work as well, we have just grown accustomed to using zippers. Getting your measurement right is key. For the outlet, you could either put a slit (using a hot knife) so that the outlet could still be accessible or remove the faceplate and cut your fabric then put the plate back on.
     
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