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Adobe VS Corel

Discussion in 'Corel' started by ChicagoGraphics, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. ChicagoGraphics

    ChicagoGraphics Major Contributor

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    Whats easier to learn Adobe Suite or Corel Suite?

    Also where do you find the clip art & photos in
    Corel draw.

    Thanks
     
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  2. WVB

    WVB Very Active Member

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    When I was back in college one semester was for Corel and the another for Adobe. Neither one was any harder to learn. What makes it difficult is going from one to another. You are already trainned and to re-train yourself is a tougher task.
     
  3. player

    player Major Contributor

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    Corel is not a true Postscript level 3 program, so the colors do not stay the same when you export.

    Adobe is and they do.

    P
     
  4. Flame

    Flame Major Contributor

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    Player is correct, however I think Corel has an easier learning curve, especially for sign applications. For drawing and true illustration purposes, I think Adobe wins.

    I have both.:Big Laugh
     
  5. MobileImpact

    MobileImpact Active Member

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    Really depends on what your trying to do. We use both daily, but usually find myself defaulting to Adobe. My graphics guy, usually defaults to Corel.

    Kevin
     
  6. weaselboogie

    weaselboogie Very Active Member

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    Depends what you're doing.

    For vector and layout I lean more towards corel (draw) than illustrator, just because I'm comfortable with it. Illustrator is great, though.

    But as a comparison for bitmaps, photoshop kills over corel's photopaint program.
     
  7. javila

    javila Active Member

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    If you got a good memory for keyboard shortcuts, go with adobe products.
     
  8. vid

    vid Very Active Member

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    Disk 2, I think.

    I work in both, as well, and that sums up my feelings, too. But, I learned to draw first in Illustrator. There seem to be more keyboard shortcuts in Illustrator that allow me to be more efficient with the tools in AI than opening and closing menus in CorelDraw...

    LOL. ...seems like Adobe users are constantly tapping the keyboard, whereas Corel Users are openning and closing and docking all the sub-menus. Corel does have nice interactive menus... but at times there's more g'dm fat finger menus opened and docked on the screen there there is room for the illustration... which sadly enough, probably makes it easier to get up to speed on how things work in CorelDraw over Illustrator.

    On a side note, it's been my experience that people who've first learned Illustrator can more easily adapt to the workings of CorelDraw rather than going from Corel to Illustrator. Don't know why, though.
     
  9. niksagkram

    niksagkram Active Member

    Also where do you find the clip art & photos in
    Corel draw.

    Thanks[/quote]

    A great little FREE app called ROMCAT is avail on the web, and it allows you to search your Corel clip art by keywords, rather than searching through the book, if you have the book :)

    I use Romcat all the time.

    Mark :Canada:
     
  10. Fred Weiss

    Fred Weiss Merchant Member

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  11. ChicagoGraphics

    ChicagoGraphics Major Contributor

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    Thanks guys & girls for all the info

    We use all Adobe products, & Flexi Pro, I just downloaded a free 30 day trial of CorelDraw, I'm not crazy about it from what I am seeing. Think will just stick to what were using now.
     
  12. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    I can't really live without having BOTH CorelDRAW and Illustrator installed on my computer. The two applications each have some extremely valuable functions unique to them the other lacks completely.

    A few of Corel's unique strengths:
    Better path editing tools, particularly at the control point level. It has taken to version CS3 for Illustrator to finally get some decent anchor point selection and alignment functions added.

    Better variety of extrude effects. IllustratorCS2 cannot do parallel extrusion effects, which is mandatory for many of my channel letter drawings and for some other 3D sign cabinet technical drawings as well. Illustrator only extrudes into vanishing point perspective.

    Corel has LOTS MORE in the way of fonts and clip art.

    Corel has an easier to customize interface.

    100' X 100' maximum work space size (Illustrator doesn't go above 227" X 227").

    A few of Illustrator's unique strengths:
    Better quality on path offset effects, stroke effects and a number of other operations that show off Illustrator's better floating point performance. Objects can be numerically dimensioned out to four decimal places (Corel only goes to three).

    Tight integration with Photoshop. You can paste Illustrator paths directly into Photoshop as pixels, vector paths or vector shape layers. Corel cannot do that at all since it does not support AICB Postscript format on the clipboard. Freehand also supported it. Corel never did.

    Superior type and color control. Illustrator also melds well with Adobe InDesign, which is even better on type control. Illustrator supports all the features of OpenType while CorelX3 does not. CorelX3 added Asian type support, but comes up short compared to Illustrator's implementation of it.

    ***

    Anyway, I hope some get the point that being a "fanboy" for only one single drawing application really doesn't make any logical sense at all. You're just limiting yourself. I might as well punch myself in the crotch as do something like that.

    I've tried lots of different drawing programs. At the bare minimum I currently refuse to have any less than 2 of the major drawing applications on my computer. For awhile I had four installed (Corel, Illustrator, Freehand and Canvas) and have even had more than that at times. And that's not counting sign-specific applications and font editors either. I couldn't care less about brand names or brand worship. The only thing which matters is having enough creative capability in vector tool function. My artwork is what counts, not being "loyal" to just one application.

    Maybe over time Illustrator and Corel will improve enough where having only one or the other will be enough. Right now that situation just doesn't exist.
     
  13. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    Adobe products would be easier tolearn if the tutorials were complete.
    That is. Too many totorials leave out steps that leave you hanging. They assume you know where to go next. And that is the real problem.

    New users try to follow a tutor and get to a certain point and the next step does not give the results as pictured. They simply cannot reproduce what the tutor is attempting to teach them to do. Thus, this frustrates the new user to the point they simply give up and beleive that Adobe products are too hard to learn..

    I found one book that was much better and teaching a user certain techniques. Tha book is The photoshop Channels book. It takes you through each step in order and without leaving anything from the methods. Never leaves you stranded.

    Corel is much more intuitive. Much easier to pick learn on the fly. The help files are robust and complete. They are very easy to traverse. The tutors avaiable are much better as well. They leave out no steps that could strand the newer user. I feel that if adobe tutors were better written and the help files more understandable then adobe would truely be king.
     
  14. player

    player Major Contributor

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    There is one thing in Corel Photopaint I like that Photoshop (as far as I know) does not have. It is the Intensity setting in the contrast brightness window.

    P
     
  15. Mardi

    Mardi Member

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    My first ever experience with graphic programs was illustrator 88 on a Mac. Since then over the years I became more comfortable with Corel and PC. While Corel has some drawbacks, today it is my primary design tool.
    I use illustrator on occasion when absolutely necessary. On the other hand, I never use Corel's Photo paint. Photoshop ROCKS.

    And yes, Adobe is hands down superior to Corel when it comes to PS language.
     
  16. weaselboogie

    weaselboogie Very Active Member

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    I'm not familiar with postscript level 3. Anyone care to explain? I know that adobe is so much better with colors than corel, but I've never understood why.
     
  17. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    Adobe developed the Postscript programming language, which was central to the birth of desktop publishing back in the 1980s. Lots of new printers spoke the language and handled the scalable Postscript Type 1 fonts that grew from it. Aldus was first to market with true Postscript-based graphics programs (PageMaker and Freehand) using technology licensed from Adobe, but Adobe soon followed with its own applications.

    Lots of people try to give Apple Computer the credit for creating the desktop publishing revolution when all they did was just make hardware on which the new applications were running. Companies like Adobe deserve far more of the credit.

    Today, Postscript is more of a legacy technology. Adobe still supports Postscript but has moved beyond it as well. The newest versions of Illustrator and InDesign are built on PDF-X technology rather than Postscript.

    Since Adobe has had so much professional back and forth collaboration with professional printing companies regarding the advances of Postscript and PDF-X that is a major reason why Adobe's applications handle type and color so much more consistently than Corel.
     
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