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Font Fondling 101

Discussion in 'Fonts and Typography' started by Jillbeans, May 1, 2007.

  1. Jillbeans

    Jillbeans Major Contributor

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    Here's a job I did today that I thought I might use to demonstrate something near and dear to me.
    I am by no means perfect, and I'm sure I unintentionally step on people's feelings with my from-the-hip critiquing.
    But I only want us all to better ourselves and our layouts.

    Something that really bugs me is when someone can afford to by a custom font, then they just type it in and puke it out of their plotter...especially scripts.

    Most scripts are supposed to be connected. Some even have little arms that can be added or need to be removed, like at the start of an "a". How often have we seen someone leaving their a with an arm outstretched with nothing to grab onto? I use that as a rule of thumb. If there is nothing that should be connected to that a (or o), cut off its poor little arm.

    If you have an editing device in your program to manipulate the nodes, feel free to mess with them. Move things. Weld things together. I have actually seen lettering on vehicles where some novice just typed it out and stuck it on unwelded, cutlines included.

    Take the alphabet used in this example, Mike Steven's Magic. He offers us an alternate "r" and "s" if we care to find it using our char map. Hold down your ALT key and type in 0137...you get an "s" that is highly connect-able. Because I can paint a script better than weed one, I like my scripts to look traditional. I could have just typed this in, thinly outlined it, deleted the original (my way of welding in GA), and cut it. But I didn't.

    I am not the world's greatest sign gal, but I thought that maybe some of you never realized the options available at your fingertips by just using ALT characters, ungrouping, node editing, and welding your scripts.

    Another thing I learned many years ago is this...if a decorative or script alphabet comes with capitals and lower case letters, you are better off using them together rather than going for the all-caps look.
    Love....Jill
     

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  2. ovrcafnatd

    ovrcafnatd Very Active Member

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    I always fondle my fonts ;)

    nice tips Jill
    and nice layout too
     
  3. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    Thank you. I just saw a panel this morning that had the cut lines in it. I asked the person displaying it why he wanted those cut lines there. He said he didn't know what they were. Just that the gaps opened up and they appeared.

    OOPS.. did I just make his garageeshopee sign guy look like an amature?
     
  4. animenick65

    animenick65 Very Active Member

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    Some good ideas Jill. Appreciated!
     
  5. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Well said and explained.

    These are the little things that most take for granted and don't put the extra time into for finalization.
     
  6. Justin (Inactive)

    Justin (Inactive) Member

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    Good points Jill. These are the things our customers don't realize or take into consideration when they ask us why it costs so much..."you just typed it out on a computer" they'll say. That's why they usually come back to the quality shops after a few experiences with the cheap guys.

    Justin
     
  7. Rich

    Rich Active Member

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    Script Lettering can be one the the most beautiful typestyles because there are so many variations of it. I love doing hand painted scripts. However, with the computer fonts.....most need that extra kerning.
     
  8. MobileImpact

    MobileImpact Active Member

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    Thanks Jill for the info and as timing would have it, I got into a "warm" discussion earlier with a customer, wanting to know why I charge $80 for a certasin signwhen he get it from one of the franchise type shops for $58. He does, however like my layout better than the "crappy looking thing" they offered him. And guess what, he choose the $58 sign.

    Oh well!

    Kevin
     
  9. Replicator

    Replicator Major Contributor

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    Thanks Jill for the reminder,

    I'm a closet Font-Fondler too . . . !
     
  10. Jillbeans

    Jillbeans Major Contributor

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    Thanks!
    I must fondle a really ugly font today.
    :)
    Love....Jill
     
  11. Creative_Lance

    Creative_Lance Very Active Member

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    Thanks Jill, don't forget to share that one too please.
     
  12. ovrcafnatd

    ovrcafnatd Very Active Member

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    just close your eyes and pretend it's Red Sable Script :Cool 2:
     
  13. Craig Sjoquist

    Craig Sjoquist Major Contributor

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    must admitt computer fondling of fonts not done yet here of any real degree ...but fondling fonts by hand all the time, can't wait when I learn n do more with the computer ...thanks for the tips, hope to use soon
    freedom is not free
     
  14. dsi

    dsi Member

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    Thanks Jill, we think alike... Always nice to get a friendly reminder from one of my favourite sign gals...

    Sarah Script is my favorite script at the moment, I really must try to branch out a bit more though :cool: :Australia
     
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