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Help, what font is this?

Discussion in 'Fonts and Typography' started by waverunner, Dec 8, 2005.

  1. waverunner

    waverunner New Member

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    Howdy all. Can anyone help with the font in the attached pic

    Thanks Heaps
     

    Attached Files:

    Tags:
  2. xtremegraphics

    xtremegraphics Member

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    Waverunner the font in question has a chisel effect applied to it... And file sharing is a no no here. Thanks Dennis
     
  3. waverunner

    waverunner New Member

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    Ok I thought font files are free as such, I have about 3 dvd's full of em, but I have no hope finding the font if I don't know it's name.
    Could you please be more specific on the font and how one would applie and chisel effect I use VM Pro and not sure if I have seen that option
     
  4. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    The base font is Compacta Black (a widely available font; anyone with a copy of CorelDRAW or Flexi is going to have it).

    The chisel effect is another matter. There is no effect filter in any drawing program anywhere that honestly does a good job in simulating a "prismatic" or "chisel" effect. The fundamental problem is computers can't properly calculate the centerline where two stems on a letter join. Photoshop can't do it either. Just run an inner bevel effect on some lettering and set the effect to a high value. You see oddball dips and turns in places where it should not happen. EnRoute3D has the same problem when trying to computer carve out the chisel effect on material.

    I just had to put that out there for anyone who might insist a certain filter does the job well. None do.

    To build up a prismatic/chisel effect on lettering, you have to do a procedure that at first seems pretty complicated. The first part of the process is breaking the letter form apart into a number of separate path segments and using something like Corel's blend tool to make the centerline path. You'll have to use the "reverse path direction" command to get the 1-step blend to fall correctly in each section. Some sections will require you to span certain centerline gaps by hand.

    Once you have an open path centerline correctly made for each letter you can use parts of that path to create closed objects to deform with cut, weld and intersect tools to make each chisel cut on the letter form.

    Sure, this process can be a tad bit time consuming. But it is the only way to get the effect to look correct. The price is the same when you want 3D letters on a sign to look right. Often you must hand carve them. Computer driven routers can't do that effect right either.
     
  5. bob

    bob Major Contributor

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    Free? I wish. Some are, but any really worth having around most certainly are not free. The free ones are worth pretty much what you pay for them.

    Chisel fonts are a specialty item and usually come in a couple of pieces intended to overlay each other. There is no effect that you can apply to create a chiseled type face. You can mess around with bevels and bitmaps but they won't do what you want. If you want a chiseled font, you buy one or laboriously create the overlay yourself. A pain in the butt, it's faster and in the long run cheaper, to just buy one that will suit your circumstances.
     
  6. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    There's actually not very many chiseled fonts out there that look decent, IMHO. There's a couple Letterhead LHF fonts that look good. But outside of that your choices are very slim.

    I don't think it takes all that long to create the chiseled effect, provided you choose a base typeface that lends itself to the procedure. Fonts with serifs and scripts usually don't work very well.
     
  7. waverunner

    waverunner New Member

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    Ok so It seems it is just too hard for a newbie such as me. As I have no idea on how to even start on chiseling, Thanks for all those that replied
     
  8. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    there are tons of tutorials for corel draw that will teach you how to chisel a font.. very easy..
     
  9. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    I don't think I would characterize the chiseling process as being "easy." It's not really very difficult at all. But the procedure does require the user to have a decent amount of familiarity with CorelDRAW. The foundation of it is good knowledge of the shape tool, path segments and weld/cut/intersect behavior.
     
  10. xtremegraphics

    xtremegraphics Member

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    If you have Signlab 7.1 it has a chisel effect tool that works real nice.
     
  11. xtremegraphics

    xtremegraphics Member

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    Heres A Quick , Chisel With Signlab 7.1 This Is Without Spending Any Time To Refine The Effect...
     
  12. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    The SignLab filter suffers from the same problems that affect all other beveling filters.

    To pick apart the .BMP file uploaded, take a look at where the strokes join. On the letter "T" there are undesirable curves happening to the centerline where the vertical stem joins the top horizontal bar. The "E" has all sorts of odd curves happening at every stroke junction. The bevel on the "X" is simply all over the place.

    If someone can produce an image of a bevel effect accurately created with a filter, I'm all up for seeing it. But I have examined many and reached the judgement that computers simply can't do it in any automated fashion. The problem is there are subjective, human decisions that have to be made in the process. While computers are fast, they have no subjective faculties.
     
  13. xtremegraphics

    xtremegraphics Member

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    Bobby On The Real Image The Lines Are Much Better, The Bmp Is Such Low Res. That You Can't Really See How Crisp The Image Is
     
  14. Bobby H

    Bobby H Very Active Member

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    It doesn't matter how crisp an image you post. It's still going to have those unwanted curves and divits at every stroke junction.

    Look at the "T" in waverunner's attached sample. The centerline doesn't divit at the stroke contour compared to the "T" in your sample.
     
  15. Pro Image

    Pro Image Major Contributor

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    :thumb: You can buy these fonts from Mr. Clipart
    It's call the chisel font collection and has 10 different fonts.............

    http://www.mr-clipart.com

    And a lot of other stuff too, I have his MR. Chisel collection of 5 fonts and they are great.............Hope this helps.
     
  16. Derf

    Derf Very Active Member

    Looks like... Utrace_bold
     
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