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Keep fixing old printer or buy new?

Discussion in 'Mimaki' started by OKC Fabric Printing, Dec 3, 2020.

  1. OKC Fabric Printing

    OKC Fabric Printing Member

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    Nov 12, 2020
    Oklahoma
    I'm torn. I have a 2015 Mimaki ts300p-1800 that i purchased used knowing it has issues and I got it really cheap (4k)+shipping and i've been using it but now i'm at a point that i'm not sure if i want to keep investing in it or replace it.
    I think i'm going to need to replace two heads. they have just too many nozzles that are clogged and i'm getting banding way too often.
    I've done all the cleanings i can think of that are possible.
    Replaced the capping stations, replaced both selective pumps..
    Do i spend another 7k on the heads (maybe 4k if i attempt to install them myself) or do i buy a new machine for 30k and just have a new machine that works....
    so
     
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  2. iPrintStuff

    iPrintStuff Prints stuff

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    Sep 3, 2018
    United Kingdom
    We have about a 10 year old mimaki solvent printer and it’s still great. As far as quality goes these things are built to last.

    There isn’t “that” much that can go wrong with these printers, the heads being likely the highest cost item. Once you get those changed out it might as well be a brand new printer.

    It all depends on the funds you have available I guess and if you’re willing to take the risk. If you want peace of mind buy new. If you can afford the 7k or whatever to get that running, it’s not the worst option.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. OKC Fabric Printing

    OKC Fabric Printing Member

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    Nov 12, 2020
    Oklahoma
    Thanks, yeah i can swing the 7k just wasnt sure if it was worth it. But you do make a great point. these machines are from what i've been reading built really well and now that i've opened it up quite a few times i'm pretty familiar with its internals so i could make small repairs on my own...

    thanks!
     
  4. hybriddesign

    hybriddesign owner Hybrid Design

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    Jul 31, 2012
    Honolulu
    I had a 2017(I think) JV300 that we were running on the SB54 sublimation ink. Contantly had ink problems (chips not recognized and we'd loose our yellow channel all the time). Eventually replaced both heads and still ended up with the same issues just a short time later. We just replaced our 6-old JV33 sublimation printer that was like a tank but getting to the point that it was going to need a bunch of parts. Purchased a smaller Epson and I think we're going to get one more to replace the JV300. The Mimaki's are a lot more solid and easier to work on but the Epson is just easy easy easy to use and priced really well. It does feel a bit like a toy my my staff loves it. I'm guessing the Epson is a 2-3 year life cycle printer and we'll need to replace it after that but it seems to be a joy to use during that time.
     
  5. netsol

    netsol Very Active Member

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    Apr 26, 2016
    englishtown, nj
    OKC

    i am glad to see the others agree with me, i am thinking your mimaki is just nicely broken in

    put the heads in
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. OKC Fabric Printing

    OKC Fabric Printing Member

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    Nov 12, 2020
    Oklahoma
    yup, i've decided to go ahead and replace two of my heads. I've already replaced two pumps and all 4 capping stations. Thanks!
     
  7. Pauly

    Pauly Colour Guru

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    Feb 14, 2016
    Melbourne
    IMO, it depends how much you rely on the printer.
    if its used now and then and you can afford to fix it, then fix it.

    if it's used in production, i'd get a new one. less downtime the better.
     
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