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Networking woes

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware' started by ChiknNutz, Sep 14, 2007.

  1. ChiknNutz

    ChiknNutz Major Contributor

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    Okay, after the problems Flamey was having, I seem to be having trouble of my own now, too.

    We just moved our shop and have a different network setup. I installed CAT5e cable in the walls, and now have a fully wired network (used to be partly wireless). Before, I had my SP-540V connected directly to my NIC via a crossover cable...no problems at all. I now have everything going thru a D-Link DI-624 router using straight-thru cables (this is both a wireless and 4-port Ethernet router). Before and still, I have been using a program called Network Magic to handle the networking "protocols" I guess you could say....seems to work pretty well as far as I can tell, but also pretty simple and doesn't offer you much control of things...it wants to manage most everything. I currently have the printers using the DHCP so their IP addresses are auto-assigned. I've had issues when I try to "hard wire" them in, but maybe I'm doing something wrong.

    Anyway, the problem I keep having is the network seems to periodically "go away"...sometimes it's working fine, other times I am forced to power down everything to get it back again, all with no rhyme or reason that I can tell.

    My biggest concern at the moment, is the printer. With it there is a program called Printserver Net-tool that you use to assign the IP address and other stuff I've no idea about. The problem I'm having, is sometimes the printer just vanishes and slips into never-never land, and this Net-Tool program then sees nothing, along with Wasatch or any other program. I've found that by turning off the power to the printer, then back on again, the network usually "sees" it again, but I'm at a loss as to why it keeps doing this. The printer goes into sleep mode after a time, and it doesn't necessarily crap out then, just kinda randomly from my persperctive.

    Okay, so I think I've explained it enough, but understand that I have a pretty feeble level of networking understanding. I know what TCP/IP addresses are, but some of the other stuff is just way beyond me at the moment.

    Although as a side note, I've just ordered a Dlink DSL-2540B modem/router as I cannot get my home computer to connect to the network wirelessly (maybe too far away or too much interference). Still, I think I DON'T want the home and business computers on the same network anyway. So, I plan to use the new modem/router for the shop, and move the old stuff into the house.
     
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  2. Pro Signs & Graphix

    Pro Signs & Graphix Very Active Member

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    Chris,

    Wireless routers have a long way to go. Dropping the network is not out of the ordinary, and running your printer.RIP through one will cause nothing but heartache. I will not get into all that we have experienced (too long), so I will ask you to just trust me on the advice.

    Add an additional NIC card to your machine. Run your printer through the additional card and/or a switch that has NOTHING to do with the router. I would even suggest running the network the same way, and use the router ONLY to access the internet, and possibly some file transfer.

    Using the wireless router to configure your network will cause nothing but headaches and heartaches, with their reliability issues.
     
  3. ChiknNutz

    ChiknNutz Major Contributor

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    Maybe I was a little unclear on this. Although the router has the capability of being used as a wireless router, it currently is ONLY being used as a WIRED router...simply because it has 4 ethernet ports already built into it. There are two computers and the printer currently on the network. Each is plugged into the wall ethernet, each component then terminates at one common place (an outlet with 6 connections), where each is connected to the router.
     
  4. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    why are you using a netwrok utility?

    The drop outs are ususalll caused by some conflict between one address or another. Collisions are all to easy when using utilities to configure a network.
     
  5. ChiknNutz

    ChiknNutz Major Contributor

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    Assuming I get rid of the utility, should I assign hard IP addys or allow them to be assigned via DHCP? Seems like it might be best to hard code them in so as to eliminate that part. Are there any other settings I need to be aware of that could be conflicting with things here?
     
  6. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    printer is set manually. Not sure about yoru printer settings, But usually when installing the printer,, the driver installer will lask you its IP address..

    All computers are set with dhcp. Let the system do its thing. Much easier and actually pretty reliable.

    Boot in this order. Router, main computer, periferal computers.
    printer
     
  7. Typestries

    Typestries Very Active Member

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    Assign static IP's to everything. Dont forget your laser printer if its TCP/IP. Your collision and IP conflict issues will be gone. Agreed on running the printer on a separate NIC. $15 well spent at staples, and you'll be conserving network traffic by not sending all that high flow printer data along with file transfer, internet, etc on the same network.
     
  8. TresL

    TresL Very Active Member

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    Type is correct....

    Hard code EVERYTHING you can.......
    As DHCP has to renew it's lease every so often and can cause issues when using basic routers.

    If your not using the wireless on the router, turn it off.
     
  9. Pro Signs & Graphix

    Pro Signs & Graphix Very Active Member

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    That is fine, and can certainly appreciate that, BUT it is a false assumption to think that that all of the "internals" are the equivalent of the quality commercial routers. Been there - done that. In short, the wireless capable routers have difficulty when under extreme network traffic.

    We have been through many and careful investigation reveals that there are only a few different "brands" of internal components that all of the manufacturers use. This "traffic" causes heat build-up and renders the "internals" inoperative - causing a drop-out of the network. Linksys, Belkin, and D-link are just a few of the names that we have purchased/used, and none seem to be immune.

    I literally keep a backup router for the permanent failures (and eventually they do become permanent). We can unfortunately recognize the situation when it occurs to us, but it still is a PITA. In a couple of months I plan to install a commercial-grade Cisco for the network (over $200), while keeping the D-Link (655) only for access to the internet.

    I know that this sounds impossible to many, but after spending literally many dollars and hours on the phone with tech support personnel, it has been concluded (by the manufacturers) that EVERY router that has been replaced has been damaged by excessive heat. I have absolutely no idea why graphic files and RIPS can a cause a problem that games do not - nor do I care. All I know is that even the manufacturers have told us that we need to change a commercial-grade router OR go the route that I originally mentioned.
     
  10. Ron Helliar

    Ron Helliar Member

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    Maybe not helpful, but I've given up on self serve IT issues. I call, he comes, it works and i'm back to making signs which I do much better than a ipwanwepstaticswitch something or other. Wouldn't recommend any other way now.
     
  11. Bogie

    Bogie Very Active Member

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    Newp... Prob being that all to often I end up taking the token computerboy aside, and telling him "You know, if you'd look this up on so-and-so, you'd understand why it won't work. Can we call the clueless vendor now?"
     
  12. ChiknNutz

    ChiknNutz Major Contributor

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    UPDATE...I uninstalled the Network Magic program and all is well now. I'm currently allowing WinXP to assign the addresses via DHCP on the computers, and have hard assigned the printer thru it's own Printserver program. So far so good after a couple of days. Just for kicks, I installed SpiceWorks on the secondary machine just as a means of monitoring everything.

    One problem that we've had a little trouble configuring, is sharing folders betwixt the computers. Problem is this, the MAIN computer sees both systems and can access both with no troubles. The SECOND system cannot access the MAIN system thru My Network Places...keeps telling me I don't have the proper priveleges to access it??? I've turned on File and Print Sharing, turned off Simple File sharing and also looked up info on the 'net regarding this. I got it to work by mapping a network drive from the SECOND system to the MAIN system and it's working...but I don't think that's the way I should have to do it...or is it? How can I GIVE the right access to the SECOND system to have complete access to the MAIN system...or is that a bad idea? Both users are set up as Administrators on each machine (I know that some say this is a bad idea to run as Admin all the time.
     
  13. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    Is is not amazing when we follow the basic directions and all is well? There is nothing wrong with allowing DHCP. Its a fine system that is reliable without any second guessing engineering.

    Mapping is a good idea. There are other ways too , ,But mapping is fine.
     
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