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Post holes with a drill...

Discussion in 'Installation Equipment & Techniques' started by Moze, Aug 14, 2020.

  1. Moze

    Moze Precision Sign Services

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    This obviously won't work in every situation, but should do the trick for most installs around here when only needing to dig two or three holes. Anything over that and I'll use a tow-behind auger.

    In the video, I'm using a 6" auger with a 24" blade height. If needing a 10" or 12" diameter hole, I would still start with the 6" and just work up to the larger sizes.

    The spot I was drilling is pretty close to a couple of large Crape Myrtle trees and it was getting into some of the roots.

    Anyway, a 6" x 24" hole in under a minute isn't bad.



    20200812_170317.jpg
     
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  2. Texas_Signmaker

    Texas_Signmaker Very Active Signmaker

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    what is the model of that drill?
     
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  3. Moze

    Moze Precision Sign Services

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    DCD460. There's a newer (slimmer) model but the specs are essentially the same.
     
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  4. netsol

    netsol Very Active Member

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    moze, in the realworld this is the minimum
    you have fairly soft soil, I suppose
    i have tried using my weka drill in a pinch, which can drill 18" concrete cores & it simply doesn't have the power to drill somevof the spots you will run in to

    in the mid 1960's some poor fool put a chain link fence around my parent's property

    he broke 4 industrial diamond bits, then brought in a crew who spent 3.days hand digging the remaining holes

    https://www.harborfreight.com/gas-powered-earth-auger-56257.html
     
  5. Texas_Signmaker

    Texas_Signmaker Very Active Signmaker

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    I duno if I'd call the dirt around here soft. It hasn't rained around here for a while so the dirt is dry as hell. I wonder how that does in the caliche
     
  6. Moze

    Moze Precision Sign Services

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    Real world? Minimum? I'm not sure what you're getting at, sorry. This is completely different than core-drilling concrete and there's absolutely nothing soft about North Texas dirt. The dirt I went through is extremely hard and compact. If it looked easy in the video, it's because it did a good job.....not because the dirt is soft.

    I started the post by saying this wouldn't be for every situation. But I've dug my share of holes around here and as stated, this will work for most situations.

    I'm not running anything gas powered unless, as mentioned, I'm drilling more than three holes. That's my "by-hand" limit.
     
  7. signage

    signage Major Contributor

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    come up here to PA and lets see that work!
     
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  8. Texas_Signmaker

    Texas_Signmaker Very Active Signmaker

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    Our dirt is hard, not soft... until it rains and becomes tar... then you can accumulate 50 lbs. of it at the bottom of your shoes.
     
  9. Moze

    Moze Precision Sign Services

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    I've dug plenty in NY and PA.....no thanks lol. Too much rock.
     
  10. netsol

    netsol Very Active Member

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    moze
    i just watched this video, about the flexvolt system





    i am still of the opinion that every tool i own, i should have a corded & a cordless version of

    i am willing to be proven wrong, we have quite a few cordless tools, but most of them are something of a disappointment.

    i may get a recip saw as a start on a whole new collection of cordless tools, if this pans out
     
  11. Moze

    Moze Precision Sign Services

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    What cordless tools do you have that are disappointments? I'm genuinely curious.

    For most corded tools, there is now a better, stronger, faster, lighter, more efficient, quieter, easier to transport (one or more may apply) cordless tool on the market. It's getting to the point that there's really no reason to have a tool with a cord hanging off of it. Yard equipment, construction-related tools, job site lighting, dust management....you name it and there's probably a cordless solution - often one that's superior to corded.

    There are obviously exceptions, but for the most part, cordless is king.
     
  12. CanuckSigns

    CanuckSigns Very Active Member

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    Much like the phone at the shop, the cord helps me find where I put it...
     
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  13. Texas_Signmaker

    Texas_Signmaker Very Active Signmaker

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    If you are disappointed w/ cordless then you have old cordless stuff. The new stuff is just a good.
    I got rid of all my corded tools except for a circular saw which I haven't used since I got the battery powered one. I also got rid of my generator that took an hour to start everytime. There is no need for any of that with what I do.

    What I'm really impressed with is the longevity of the batteries. I've had some of the same batteries for almost 5 years and none of them are showing signs of weakness.
     
  14. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

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    Tex, are you an Italian Texan?
     
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  15. Texas_Signmaker

    Texas_Signmaker Very Active Signmaker

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    :roflmao: actually yes, with a new york accent
     
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  16. netsol

    netsol Very Active Member

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    tex/moze

    we are just going to have to agree to disagree on this,
    it has nothing to do with the age/quality of MY CORDLESS TOOLS

    the manufacturers agree with me, MARKETING VIDEOS ASIDE

    your dewalt provides 140 newton meters of torque

    my old hole hawg, a milwaukee with a cord, after converting ft/lb to Nm comes in at 623 Nm

    compared to the harbor freight (cheap chinese crap) 2 hp gas operated auger, the hole hawg is a childs toy & it has 4 times the torque of your drill



    there are no warnings that there must be 2 men holding on to the handles to operate any of these drills, in case they bind while you are drilling


    that being said, i did order one from an online dewalt reseller, it really looks like a great piece of equpment (i love my toys)
     
  17. Moze

    Moze Precision Sign Services

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    Not sure what we're even disagreeing on, but ok.

    Not sure what cordless tools you have that have been disappointments because you won't say.

    Not sure where you got the torque specs from (nor do they tell the whole story of how well a tool performs anyway....) because DeWalt hasn't published them to my knowledge.

    Not sure why you would think two people would be needed on the DeWalt drill when one of the key features is the e-clutch which counteracts bind up (and is clearly shown in the video).
     
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  18. GAC05

    GAC05 Major Contributor

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    This is getting interesting

    holes.jpg
     
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  19. Billct2

    Billct2 Major Contributor

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    Digging holes in New England 40 years and it's hardly ever easy, except near the beach or old river bottom. Tried one/two man gas augers but they just want to break your wrist when they hang up. The only sure method is a tow behind auger, but need a bogl job for those. We do have a job right now where we ran into the worst circumstances, old sidewalk/foundation/construction debris a foot below the surface. Renting a jack hammer for this one.
     
  20. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    Well, to each their own and what one feels comfortable using, let alone investing in. However, I would say if you're making a video, you should at least wear proper fitting clothing and shoes. Not to mention safety glasses. Otherwise, you'll be a tool, if seen by the wrong people.
     
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