Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

ProxyServers

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware' started by shakey0818, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. shakey0818

    shakey0818 Active Member

    918
    0
    0
    Aug 12, 2010
    I was wondering if anyone uses a proxy server to hide their ip address.With all the hackers,sites looking at your info and sites you have visited it seems best to just hide your comp from the world.I have done a little research and i just don't get it.I hear of free ones ,ones u pay like $10 a month & i even heard of using a old comp as one.The other thing is some servers keep track of all your activity.Ultimately i would like to find a pay proxy that doesn't save your search history,and one that is user friendly.If anybody has any input i'd be glad to hear it.ty
     
    Tags:
  2. njshorts

    njshorts Active Member

    708
    0
    16
    Mar 15, 2011
    Meadville, PA
    not worth it. paranoia != security.

    If you're hacking, a proxy is needed. If you're just doing normal, day to day operations... It's not worth the latency. Any "site looking at your info" is reading your cookies, which will be placed and read with or without a proxy. For defending from hackers, run a decent hardware firewall (NOT SOFTWARE!) like the one built into most routers... Linksys, Apple and DLink all have sufficient protection built-in.
     
  3. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

    8,520
    8
    38
    Jun 24, 2003
    michigan
    For some a proxy server is used to get you into blocked sites.
    Sometimes for unknown reasons an ISP will block a site. Or they will block chat lines as well.
    Right now ATT is blocking a common info site. This has been going on for months and is nation wide. I use a proxy to get to that site daily. Verizon is blocking chat lines such as MIRC for some unknown reason. Calls to them only results in frustration because they say they are not blocking. A ping to an Ip address shows the node that is blocking.

    A proxy server will get you a static IP address. Users of cable who cannot get or do not wish to pay for a static IP address will use a proxy server to get a static IP address.

    Other use a proxy service to filter incoming data. I set up one for a company that did not want any porn coming into their system.

    Others wil use them for speed gains. To speed up access to resources (using caching).

    Some use them for log / audit usage to provide company employee Internet usage reports and to scan outbound content, e.g., for data leak protection.

    Internet-facing proxy is a front-end to control and protect access to a server on a private network, commonly also performing tasks such as load-balancing, authentication, decryption or caching.

    To dismiss a proxy as a mere hacker device is a little narrow in scope. Looking at cookies is a long dead way to track who you are. Your configuration via your browser is a much better fingerprint. For example. You will have a font library and your browser will list every font there. When you visit a website that list will be revealed via your browser.

    Some companies more often than not use them to eavesdrop on the employees. So watch it employees.
     
  4. njshorts

    njshorts Active Member

    708
    0
    16
    Mar 15, 2011
    Meadville, PA
    This is partially true. MIRC is a program, IRC is a protocol. A proxy is a good way to get around upstream controls, however... that's not what he's trying to do.

    A proxy will NOT 'get' you a static IP address, however will make it appear that you are coming from another address each time you use the same proxy, provided addresses aren't utilized in a load balancing or round-robin configuration. You cannot accept inbound requests via a proxy IP, nor can you establish any ip-based security as untold amounts of other users are using the same IP as a proxy. (This excludes paid-for access, in which you can pay to have a dedicated proxy ip just for you- still won't support inbound requests and is just as insecure as using your own IP- moot point)

    This is true, but not his goal- and generally is not implemented on free/cheap services.

    This is only true if you are running your own proxy (preferably locally) and have it configured to do so.

    See above, plus a few paid-for services. Also, doesn't appear to be the OP's focus.

    See above, again. There are a number of other more secure controls and I haven't seen this method implemented in years.

    Font cache? Seriously? That can be mined, but is far from a security risk. Browser configuration? Yes, me and the other 100,000 people that have the same browser and OS.

    100% true, but not applicable.

    (edit) I had to add point by point... let's be honest here... no need to inundate people with useless information and misinformation... why not stick to the question?
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2011
  5. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

    8,520
    8
    38
    Jun 24, 2003
    michigan
    Seriously.

    Talk about misinformation.. Read your fist post. Your narrow minded response did nothing to answer his question.

    In response to your narrow and limited response I posted to show that there are many legitimate uses for proxy other than avoidance of hacking. So your point by point list of information is just as useless as your first post. I posted to give out general data to any one who may feel it important and relevant to the topic.
    Reading your point by point diatribe shows you actually agree with what I posted in most cases. You can only find minor faults with the rest of points listed.

    Then your point about Font Cache? What the hell does fingerprint have to do with font cache.

    I am pointing out the relevant and for some an informative point that that a browser config file will form a unique finger print of a particular machine which is fully identifiable and traceable. Regardless of using a proxy or otherwise. I also pointed out that visiting some sites will give them a full reading of that browser config file for particular computer including every font in the Font folder..
    That may not be a risk to you but others may find their personal information tied to a specific computer a little concerning. But I never said anything about a security risk. Those are your words.

    In fact you dismiss it as a security risk. While you believe that.. there are other research firms spending resources developing ways to hide or encrypt the browser config file. Seems strange all that research going into something that is not worth worrying about...

    And finally. Software firewalls combined with nearly all late model cable modems and DSL modems do an excellent job of keeping in and out data packets with ill intent.
     
  6. choucove

    choucove Active Member

    809
    0
    0
    Feb 25, 2008
    This is just my opinion, but if what you are looking to accomplish is the protection of your information from the rest of the internet, then the best bet would be to get a hardware firewall put in place. While many basic wireless routers integrate a basic firewall, there are a couple better solutions that really step up the protection. First, a more business-oriented wireless router will have a stronger firewall system. The SMC Barricade ProMax N wireless router is one I've been using at several locations and I am really impressed with it. Very powerful and flexible, and it has a built in firewall with intrusion prevention. There are a LOT of security features and settings I don't even know about, but it's a great tool for having a firewall and costs around $110 including a built-in USB print or file sharing server, 4-port gigabit switch, 300Mb/s wireless transfer rate, and a rather long-range wireless coverage area.

    If you want something better than that, I'd recommend the Sonicwall TZ100, which is a dedicated firewall appliance. It's cheap as far as dedicated firewalls and very easy to set up. You can also purchase a subscription package that adds a lot of features to the device, such as a real-time network continuous virus scanner, content filtering, intrusion prevention, and much more.

    If what you're looking for, though, is just simply to hide your IP address then there are several ways to do so now without having to use a proxy server. I actually believe there is a web browser that will do it all for you. You have to download and install a small applet that runs as a service on your computer, but then you run the matching web browser, which sends all traffic through its own dedicated random loop of proxies to hide your IP address without having to program or set anything up.
     

Share This Page

 


Loading...