Welcome To Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals

Signs101.com: Largest Forum for Signmaking Professionals is the LARGEST online community & discussion forum for professional sign-makers and graphic designers.

 


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Need Help same RGB different color

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by shacho, Nov 22, 2018.

  1. shacho

    shacho Member

    45
    2
    8
    Aug 19, 2015
    canada
    A customer sent me 2 files the other day and they both had colors with the same RGB values yet they printed different. The color was close to black. One printed nice and one printed super thick.
     
    Tags:
  2. Christian @ 2CT Media

    Christian @ 2CT Media Major Contributor

    4,650
    724
    113
    Jun 15, 2009
    Mesa, Arizona
    It's either the embedded icc profile they used or its your rip converting wrong due to however you have your file handling set up.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. shoresigns

    shoresigns Very Active Member

    1,534
    299
    83
    Nov 1, 2011
    Vancouver, BC
    Yes, it's more than likely a difference in ICC profiles between the two files. If one file is sRGB and the other is Adobe RGB but the RGB colour values are exactly the same, they will print differently unless your RIP is set to ignore ICC profiles. They'll also look slightly different on-screen if you're viewing them in an app that takes ICC profiles into account, like Adobe Acrobat/Reader.

    Without an ICC profile, an RGB file is uncalibrated, so the values do not refer to a precise, fixed colour. It's like saying a foot is the length of a human foot (as it used to be), versus the precise, standardized measurement that we call a "foot" today.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. shacho

    shacho Member

    45
    2
    8
    Aug 19, 2015
    canada
    does anyone know in versaworks where i check "ignore icc profile"?
     
  5. shoresigns

    shoresigns Very Active Member

    1,534
    299
    83
    Nov 1, 2011
    Vancouver, BC
  6. dypinc

    dypinc Very Active Member

    1,643
    112
    63
    Mar 9, 2011
    CCPUSA
    But you still have to assign the correct source profile. The trick is to figure out which one, if the designer is NOT knowagable enough to assign one which I find an unbelievable amount don't/won't do, no matter how much you explain it to them and why.
     
  7. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Active Member

    817
    116
    43
    Dec 11, 2017
    So Cal
    Just a heads-up to beware of the linked PDF that contains technical falsehoods, errors, and misunderstandings as published. The particular document, ironically created exactly 6 years today, is actually just a portion from an earlier document years before.

    Users could be well served if Roland would review and update some of their published tutorials.

    If I were the OP, I would contact Roland with my "RGB different colors" quandary.
     
  8. shoresigns

    shoresigns Very Active Member

    1,534
    299
    83
    Nov 1, 2011
    Vancouver, BC
    Would you mind elaborating? We rely on much of the information in that PDF to run our printer here.
     
  9. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Active Member

    817
    116
    43
    Dec 11, 2017
    So Cal
    Picked and paraphrased cherries…

    “sRGB produces relatively flat looking colors.”
    If this were true, which it is not, does Roland suggest to their users that any sRGB files are just lost to “flat looking colors?” Knowing that my sRGB files result in bright colors on different makes and models of other machines, I might conclude that Roland machines are thus inferior and cannot handle common sRGB files, so why would I bother with their brand? Their statement is incorrect as I know their machines can work produce great work with sRGB files. After all, the vast majority of all digital photos are in sRGB color space at this point in time.

    Roland asserts the sRGB gamut is “relatively small,” the larger gamut Adobe 1998 “produces relatively bright images,” and Roland_SignRGB “is slightly bigger than the AdobeRGB 1998 and is designed to produce vivid and saturated colors.”
    Their principle begs the question; why not just go ahead and use the common and nonproprietary ProPhoto RGB working space that has already been in use for 20 years which will surely encompass future ink sets for year to come, if not for ever?

    “VersaWorks has the ability to process bitmap (Raster) and Vector data separately.”
    Awesome, except their given graphic examples show Colorimetric being used for raster elements of flowers no less. Exactly the wrong photographic subject to convert using colorimetric. The setting should show Perceptual as the example for the user to be successful at printing flowers or most any other natural-world scenes and colors. Furthermore, can the option of choosing differing Matching Methods (rendering intents) between raster and vector elements present potential problems for designers and print makers? Absolutely yes, so beware.

    The document has more cherries to pick but I’ll stop here.

    See the attached file as a sample of flowers in ProPhoto RGB color space. Make copies by converting to AdobeRGB(1998) and another to sRGB. Do they appear different on your monitor? Try printing the 3 files. Do they appear different in print?
     

    Attached Files:

Loading...

Share This Page

 


Loading...