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Screws in Enamel Paint Can Lids

Discussion in 'Hand Made Signs' started by stickybeak, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. shoresigns

    shoresigns Very Active Member

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    That probably only works in the southern hemisphere.
     
  2. TimToad

    TimToad Very Active Member

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    Lettering enamels have a higher amount of solids and if left on the shelf for any length of time either in the sign supply warehouse or your shop, need to be STIRRED not shaken to re-emulsify them and blend the settled solids back into the pigment and binders.

    The method I'm about to describe is both a clean, mess free way of dispensing paint from a can and it is also a good measuring device with minimal waste in case you are trying to follow some kind of formula to achieve a particular color. ie. You can mix a very nice, clean medium brown that will cover better than 1Shot medium brown with equal parts of 102 Fire Red and 144 Medium Green.

    It can be used with a half pint all the way up to a five gallon bucket if need be. You just need to use the right size flat stick for the given size can of paint.

    Get yourself a box of doctor's tongue depressors. Open your can of paint, take a 16 penny nail and hammer three or four holes around the bottom of the rim. Stir paint liberally until smooth and silky. Take a waxless Dixie cup, can or other receptacle and hold it at an angle just above the opening in the can of paint. Dip your tongue depressor* all the way down to the bottom of the can of paint. *use larger paint stir sticks for quart size or larger. With an up and down motion, pull up the stick full of paint and scrape the paint off onto the tilted lip of the cup, can, etc. Repeat as many times as necessary.

    No muss, no fuss and you can be very accurate in how much is dispensed.
     
  3. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    If you have cans of paint laying around which need a tongue depressor for a stirring stick, then you ain't painting non too much, huh ??

    If you know your color wheel and color theory, there are so many ways to achieve the colors of your choice. Many.

    It's quite obvious one needs a stirring stick of some sort, once a can has been opened. Either break through the skin and go on your merry way or just decide if you can mix the thin membrane over and have it become part of the mix once again. Before a can has been opened, they all go in our electric mixing machine. We also have electric mixers which stir up an old can of paint much faster and more thorough than a stick by hand.

    For those who just stir the paint a few times and move on, you really aren't getting all the ingredients in your paint job. However, with all the additives and bullsh!t most put in to prevent drag, make time and promote this, that or whatever....... your paint today is practically worthless. Paint is basically meant to be used right outta the can. Sure, disperse it into a small cup or tin container, but if you've added thinner, penetrol, jap drier or any other additive, throw that paint away when your done with that job, because dumping that back in your can contaminates the good paint. No saving that paint anymore. To prevent this, just palette your paint with whatever additives of your choosing as you go, then you can return the leftover paint to the original can, again.
     
  4. Tfloraditch

    Tfloraditch Member

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    Gino I think you mean Rim Shot!
     
  5. Tfloraditch

    Tfloraditch Member

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    I was taught to leave the skin on the top of the paint. When you open the can just poke a small hole on one side and remove what you need and let than skin seal back up. Removing the skin just forces the paint to make a new skin.
     
  6. Bevets

    Bevets New Member

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    I'm going to try zip lock freezer bags and see how that works.
     
  7. rjssigns

    rjssigns Major Contributor

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    Decades ago I helped out a sign painter and he did the same thing. Only he used small soup cans in his kit. Left them open to the air. Always thought it a bit odd, but it worked.
     
  8. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    PAINT...... what da heck is paint ??
     

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