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Hello 3D modelers

Discussion in '3D Modeling' started by Techman, May 12, 2013.

  1. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    Hello 3D modelers...
    We have our own room.
    :rock-n-roll:
     
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  2. mezalick

    mezalick Member

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    Glad to be here.
    Michael

    PS Picture taken by James McGrew
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Hello! I'm not a 3D modeler yet, but a wanna be! Can I stay? LOL!
     
  4. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Hello! I'm not a 3D modeler yet, but a wanna be! Can I stay?
    I was listening to the overview about the autodesk program, sounds like they are speaking German or French, or some other language I know a few words in, but not in a fluent way! LOL! Interesting stuff, would love to learn.

    I have a Customer who has presented a challenge for me. They have asked me to develop an animated cartoon character for them. I want to model it in 3D first, then use that for making cartoons. Just thinking about it now.

    http://www.autodesk.com/products/autodesk-maya/overview
     
  5. SignManiac

    SignManiac Major Contributor

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    Is this for CNC projects and software?
     
  6. Suz

    Suz Very Active Member

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    Oops, never mind. :smile: This is not the place for what I am trying to do.
     
  7. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    Yes,

    I pray it gets lots of posts.

    I have not cut any 3d work for a couple of weeks now. Just a run of production parts and another run of projects of postcards for EDDM campaigns. So I have nothing new to add today.
     
  8. Ted

    Ted New Member

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    I've been using 3DS max 8, well, since 2008. I'm a sign designer, started out as a sign painter back in the day.
    For sign designers, it's becoming a standard feature for larger sign shops. With 3DS max we can digitally build the sign
    before production begins. With the software's ability to create realistic lighting, we can see how to light the sign at night as well,
    LED, neon and exterior light sources can be worked out before we build. The customers really love it and helps sell the sign.

    I taught myself how to use this software by using the trial version, then after 30 days, reformatting my hardrive on a spare PC I had, and
    go for another 30 days until I got good at it. I learned most of what I know from great tutorials on line and you tube.
    Once I got good at the software and knew what I was doing I made the pitch to may boss, showing him the possibilities
    with signs I designed in 3D and how that would sell signs. The fact that I was already proficient with the software and there would be
    no learning curve, I could hit the ground running. He was sold, then paid for the software, (very expensive). He's made his money back 10
    fold, and now can't imagine how the company could function without it.

    If for no other reason, just learning the software yourself would greatly increase your job prospects, not to mention just for the fun of it.
     
  9. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    how long did it take to get "good" at 3D max?
     
  10. Ted

    Ted New Member

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    Roughly 6 months, just working a couple of hours a night, not every night, just when I could get to it.
    It's just a matter of keeping at it and not getting frustrated. The tuts on youtube etc were invaluable.

    That was just to learn the very basics and get fairly proficient at it to show my boss the value of it.
    I've been working with it for about 5 yrs now so I can pretty much visualize anything I need to now.
    You can also do animated fly arounds or walk thrus. It has some cool animation tools.
    Also materials such as glass, neon, back lighting caustics thru translucent materials are so much more realistic.

    It's pretty basic time wise, the more time you commit the sooner you'll get better at it.
    I must admit, 3DS max has a big learning curve. Don't kid yourself that its going to be easy.

    At times it was very frustrating, but I kept plugging away at till I figured it out.
     
  11. Gene@mpls

    Gene@mpls Very Active Member

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    I bought Aspire 4 a few months back- I use it for modeling 3d signs and really like it. Vectric sez that the next update will import directly from Sketchup which will
    be good. I attached a jpeg which is a mashup of the sign elements on top of a mockup of the brushed alum background panel- I like to be able to show peeps at
    least a good approximation of what I am thinking. Gene
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Ted

    Ted New Member

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    A sample of how 3DS Max renders the final 3D.

    The photo on the left is the finished, installed sign. The photo on right is the 3DS design.
    It would be very difficult to show how the lighting effects would work just using a 2-D software.


    2.jpg dudes nite.jpg
     
  13. MikeD

    MikeD Active Member

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    Is this forum just for mock-ups, or will it include discussion of 3d printers? They are great for making master models for molds that could be used for casting metal plaques or signs
    http://www.deltamaker.com/

    I had a compucarve for a while, but could never get the fine detail I was after without buying 3rd party custom bits
     
  14. Ted

    Ted New Member

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    I would think so, since 3D printers are part of the end process of 3D file creation, or mock ups as you said.

    3D files I've created also export to CNC routers for 3D reliefs.

    The end results, in the sign biz anyway, is either built/fabricated, routed or 3D printed.

    I for one would like to know much more about 3D printers and all the possibilities that can be achieved by them in the sign area.
     
  15. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    I would love to see this area become a haven for all 3D work.
     
  16. peavey123

    peavey123 Active Member

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    I'm just getting into 3D. I used to be a draftsman when I was fresh out of college and couldn't find a design job. So I did dabble in 3d with autoCAD as well as Inventor, but mostly 2d shop drawings.

    Now that I'm in the sign business, I want to use 3d for a couple uses. For visualizations of signage/sign structures on larger jobs. Merging my photography with 3d for art purposes. AND The other - most relevant to this thread, for CNC.

    I've found a couple CNC plug-ins for blender specifically, but I need to look into that part of it more. It may just be a case of exporting my model to the CNC software? I'm sure one of you know's better.

    My boss is starting to look at and research CNC machines. What are your workflows from 3d to CNC? Any thoughts on best software? I've noticed Gerber CNC's require use their software but the machines are super accurate?

    Here's a little render I did over the past couple days. I learned a lot in this exercise. There are some texturing mistakes I made but whatever I had fun. This little open source 3d program is powerful stuff.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Ted

    Ted New Member

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    Nice job on that airline jet. You did that with Blender?

    I tried Blender a couple of years ago but I couldn't be accurate with it since there was no way to type in measurements like Corel Draw, Auto Cad and 3DS Max. It would not import any file type I had for export either.
    Maybe that's changed? It's a great open source, (FREE), program but the learning curve is going to take a big investment in time.

    As far as file types, our router will import Sterio Litho, .STL file types. We can route a 3D form in layers, like a cake, to build/stack the form so you can go as high as you can stack it. It's only going to see the form from the top view down, like a relief, so any part of the form that goes underneath will not be seen by the router. It's pretty forgiving in a sense because it does see that way since any polygon mess you have inside or underneath the outside surface will not be seen and will not effect the top surface.
     
  18. peavey123

    peavey123 Active Member

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    Thanks. Yup. Blender. version 2.69. Cycles render engine.

    You can in fact input your dimensions in blender. Imperial or metric. I don't know what version you tried but it's been improving by leaps and bounds in the last couple years. Next update will have a newer UI as well. If you tried any version before 2.5 i believe it was insanely difficult. 2.5 and on is much easier.

    What router are you using and what software?
     
  19. Ted

    Ted New Member

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    It was years ago when I experimented with Blender and the interface was difficult to deal with. I'm certain it was before 2.5. I eventually convinced my boss here at Snyder Signs, Johnson City TN to invest in 3DS Max.
    I had taught myself how to use it using their demo first then showed him what was possible with it so I lost interest in Blender after that. 3D knowledge of 3D software of any kind is now becoming a basic requirement even in the sign design area so it's good you're getting that under your belt.

    The router we use is a Techno CNC router. Not sure if I would recommend it though since the router guys down there seem to ***** about it so much. The software I use is 3DS Max, Corel Draw, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator on rare occasions. Export/Import is fairly simple, .dxf files for any flat material and .stl files for any 3D relief routing.

    You can view photos of work we do here at Snyder Signs at my Linkedin link below. I'm the senior designer here. Good luck with the 3D work.

    http://www.linkedin.com/profile/vie...08072.amf_2308072_57527543&trk=anetppl_profil
     
  20. SignManiac

    SignManiac Major Contributor

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    Mars Florida
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