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HP 315 black ink not drying

Discussion in 'Hewlett Packard' started by depps74, May 18, 2018 at 9:20 AM.

  1. depps74

    depps74 Member

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    I have been having drying issues with my blank ink on my HP 315. It does not completely dry in the most saturated parts. Yesterday I printed on the static cling. It was an image with a lot of saturated black ink. The black ink did not completely dry. This has happened with black and white prints on other materials too but never with other colored prints, so I think I have narrowed down the problem to black inks only. The areas in which they are wet tend to be the darkest and most saturated black parts Any idea what could be causing this, or how it might best be fixed?
     
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  2. flyplainsdrifta

    flyplainsdrifta Member

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    what are your setup settings i.e.. heat, pass count, ip delay??
     
  3. EffectiveCause

    EffectiveCause Premium Subscriber

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    Increase your heat setting. If you cant then increase your pass count. If you cant add any more passes then add an interpass delay.
     
  4. depps74

    depps74 Member

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    What is the best way to increase heat? Do I need to clone a profile to do that? When I try to do it directly on the profile it is greyed out and won't let me. IS there a video that goes over how to do this? I have not found one.
     
  5. P Wagner

    P Wagner Very Active Member

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    There are over 100 training videos that HP has published for Latex printers, covering literally dozens of applications, systems, and topics. I would recommend that you bookmark them, starting here:

     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  6. EffectiveCause

    EffectiveCause Premium Subscriber

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    I dont know how similar the 315 is to the 370, but on ours I can go to the substrate library and select the one I want to change, then hit the modify button, then push the the pencil button next to the profile you want to change and the temp adjustment is on the first screen. Also during a job you can select the job on the home screen and on the next screen it will have an adjustments button. Click that and you can change it there too.

    I normally increase 10 degrees at a time until it drys or starts warping the material. If it starts effecting your material you'll need to back track the temp and create a profile with a higher pass count if you don't have one already.
     
  7. depps74

    depps74 Member

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    This is really helpful. Thank you. One question though, doesn't the pass count mean more ink? I understand how this slows the drying time down, but doesn't it compound the issue with more ink? I have heard inter delay pass can also help, but have had no luck finding that on the menu either.


    tHanks again Effective Cause!
     
  8. dypinc

    dypinc Very Active Member

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    100% K only should not have a drying problem unless your heat or curing time is too low. Or, are you adding CMY to your black for some reason which would give you a milky black anyhow and not look as rich a 100% K only.

    Does the black (which is 100% K only) on your calibration target cure okay?
     
  9. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Member

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    Take the time to learn as suggested by P Wagner...
     
  10. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Member

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    Or the ink restrictions are not set properly.

    Are you sure this statement is correct?
     
  11. dypinc

    dypinc Very Active Member

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    I am not sure what you mean by this question? Please clarify.

    Latex ink is a different than most other inks. Too much and the output becomes milking looking. I have tested adding various output percentages of CMY to 100% output K and have not found any combination to give a better black than 100% output K only. Might be some combination of output CMY percentage with with lower than 100% output K percentage that might possible work but I have never see it.
     
  12. EffectiveCause

    EffectiveCause Premium Subscriber

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    No it still uses the same amount of ink just prints smaller bands so it takes more passes under the print head which means a longer time under the heater too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. EffectiveCause

    EffectiveCause Premium Subscriber

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    Actually you can achieve much deeper blacks building them with cmyk than with k alone.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. dypinc

    dypinc Very Active Member

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    With Latex ink? What is your output build that you can achieve that? Is it really deeper than the 100% K of your calibration target?
     
  15. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Member

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    You might familiarize yourself more with ink restrictions and the term Rich Black.

    Happy to help further if you like.
     
  16. dypinc

    dypinc Very Active Member

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    I know all about Rich Black, use it all the time on all kind of devices, but it just does not produce the best black with latex ink. 100% output K only of the HP latex ink printers do not need ink restrictions.

    So why can you not answer a simple question instead of going around and around about rich black. Are you able to achieve a richer black than the 100% output K of the calibration target with latex ink, as I have already explained why I find rich black not to work with latex ink..
     
  17. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Member

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    Uh, you've said it yourself. "Too much." Readdress your ink restrictions. Then you know what you need to do after that's finished. Right?

    Then how many hoops do you need to jump through to make prints match from those devices to your latex printer?
     

    Attached Files:

  18. AKwrapguy

    AKwrapguy Active Member

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    With latex the higher pass count does not equal more ink. To increase or decrease your ink you need to use the ink density.

    With heavy saturated areas not drying....

    increase your heat, the material might become deformed in the 'curing area' a little deformation is ok but a lot means that your heat is too high.

    Increase the number of passes, this will give you more 'dwell time' in the curing area.

    Increase/decrease ink density, this will adjust the amount of ink that the printer lays down.

    So if you can try adjusting any or all three of these.

    Watch some videos on how to adjust these if your unsure how. HP has a profile setup feature where you can set up a material specific profile and adjust all of these and more to help achieve a constant product. I suggest you look at using it as it will get you better acquainted with your machine and the setting.
     
  19. dypinc

    dypinc Very Active Member

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    The bitmap image you posted is not a candidate for printing pure primaries/inkjet black. To limit having to use heavy ink restrictions in the media preset it would be best to regenerate the GCR in your output profile to minimize the use of CMY in the dark areas. That could be consider ink restriction of CMY in the color management on the RIP if if you want to call it that. Since getting good blacks is a challenge with the Latex printers, that way ink restrictions of CMY are only applied to the dark areas and not the lighter areas such as your intense blues which would benefit from allowing your media preset to have a higher ink density setting. Since we know that 100% output K is the best black the latex ink can produce it only make sense to maximize its use. Whether it is Black that can be replaced with 100% output or a range of blacks that can benefit for heavy use of black and minimal use of CMY in the GCR setting of you output profile.

    Since my lowest gamut device is likely to be the Latex printer, so as you see I use every technique I have available to get the maximum gamut out of it first in case I do need to match it with another output device, which for what I do is very rare.
     
  20. ColorCrest

    ColorCrest Member

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    I think the image file I have posted is a candidate for the issue the OP has described...
    I think the OP will find his solution from some of the good direction provider earlier.
     
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